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    Obskure Wörter in Wörterbüchern: Sind Kreuzworträtsel schuld? Gibt es Unterschiede zwischen DE und EN?

    Topic

    Obskure Wörter in Wörterbüchern: Sind Kreuzworträtsel schuld? Gibt es Unterschiede zwischen DE und EN?

    Comment

    Chamber's Twentieth Century Dictionary was first published in 1901, under the industrious editorship of Thomas Davidson. The dictionary was to become the recommended source for crossword puzzles because of the inclusion of obsolete, dialectical and Scottish words in its extensive lexicon. Dictionary fans loved the quirky and individualistic definitions which were started by Davidson and continued by later editors. William Geddie, in his preface to the 1962 edition, commented on these amateur lexicographers. 'Scores of users have sent in single words and lists of words. We have not accepted all their definitions. One was disappointed not to find myristicivorous, feeding upon nutmegs, a word to which we grant this place on the doorstep but still deny admission to the dictionary.'

    http://www.crossword.org.uk/chambers.htm

    Zitiert in Siehe auch: myristicivorous - sich von Muskatnüssen ern... - #15


    Im Faden zu myristicivorous habe ich den obigen Text zum Chambers Dictionary zitiert. Inzwischen wurde das Wort tatsächlich im Chambers aufgenommen und auch der Collins hat es. Ich frage mich jetzt:

    • Wirkt auf Wörterbücher ein Selektionsdruck hin zu möglichst vielen obskuren Wörtern, weil Rätselfreunde ein wichtiger Markt sind?
    • Vielleicht auch nur im EN-Sprachbereich, weil es da mehr Rätsel gibt, in denen obskure Wörter eine Rolle spielen?
    • Vielleicht galt das nur, solange es das Internet noch nicht gab?

    Discuss.

    Author Mattes (236368)  19 May 22, 16:47
    Comment

    Hier wird es bereits im Jahr 2013 erwähnt :


    A History of the Chambers Dictionary - Page 83 - Google Books Result

    https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=VaHoBQAAQ...

    Mariusz Kaminski · 2013 · ‎Language Arts & Disciplines

    editor remarked, “A dictionary with a bulky supplement is a waste of time and a ... to include myristicivorous, a derivative of botanic/chemical origin: (.


    #1Author no me bré (700807) 19 May 22, 17:08
    Comment

    No me bre, dein Ausschnitt bezieht sich auf das Zitat von 1962 im OP. Bei Google findet man eine Ausgabe des Chambers von 1998 mit dem Eintrag: https://books.google.de/books?id=pz2ORay2HWoC...


    Aber ich würde gerne versuchen, das Thema erst einmal bei meinen Fragen zu halten :-)

    #2Author Mattes (236368)  19 May 22, 17:35
    Comment

    There is one BE crossword puzzle which would be impossible without access to Chambers and its stock of very obscure words: "The Listener" puzzle which appears in the Saturday edition of The Times. To succeed with this crossword you really need Chambers and you also need a very extensive vocabulary of your own and a wide knowledge of modern life in the English speaking world. (Mrs Ecgberht and I have two copies of Chambers, an older edition and the current one, both heavily used in our attempts on The Listener. Sometimes we manage to solve it (working together) within a week, but not always.) Access to the internet and a good search engine could not usurp Chambers' role eg many of the solutions in The Listener do not appear in the online "Crossword Solver/ Anagramiser" websites or elsewhere. What proportion of the sales of Chambers comes from puzzlers is probably unknown - I would guess not too high.

    An aside: a brilliant feature of Chambers is the etymologies it gives for nearly every entry - fascinating.

    Another English dictionary containing words that are far from everyday is the "Official Scrabble Players Dictionary". Only Scrabblers would buy it.

    #3Author Ecgberht (469528)  19 May 22, 17:48
    Comment

    I have the 1972 edition of Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary which used to belong to my parents. I think they gave it to me when they bought a newer dictionary. We got it out every time Scrabble was played in my family.


    #4Author Dragon (238202) 19 May 22, 19:12
     
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