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  • Betrifft

    narration / narrator

    Kommentar
    Sometimes when I hear "narration" or "narrator", I'd swear there is an extra sound,
    i.e., 4 syllables instead of 3, or at least 3 1/2 syllables.

    I found the pronunciations on here (McM) quite interesting. You can toggle between the AE and BE versions:
    http://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciat...

    The BE clearly sounds like a "short R", if that makes sense, whereas in AE, I think we add an extra sound,
    or it's at least a "long R". Are there terms for this phenomenon?

    Maybe this helps ... sometimes I hear "nar(a)ration"/"nar(a)rator"
    from AE speakers, for lack of a better way to write it.
    Verfasseropine (680211) 19 Feb. 11, 07:44
    Kommentar
    Okay, I'll put on my phonetician's hat. Certainly the speaker on the Macmillan link does something very strange with his r's. But the strangest thing of all to me is that he stresses the first syllable (as does the American on Merriam-Webster). This obviously involves lengthening the first syllable, i.e. the whole first syllable, including the r, and this I think produces the effect opine describes. I must say I've never heard anyone (even Americans) actually pronounce "narrator" like this (and I work with Americans in film studios where "narrator" is a commonly used word).

    Note that in (most varieties of) AE (incl. GA), a syllable can end with an /r/, while in most varieties of BE (including RP) it can't. This means that in AE, the /r/ in narrator belongs to both syllables, in RP it only belongs to the second.

    It would be interesting to hear from a Bostonian.
    #1Verfasser escoville (237761) 19 Feb. 11, 11:08
    Kommentar
    Thanks escoville. I feel less crazy. I most appreciate your breakdown about the /r/ belonging to both syllables. That helps me understand what I hear in AE, and helps me differentiate from the BE pronunciation. Your phonetician's hat was not donned in vain.
    #2Verfasseropine (680211) 19 Feb. 11, 12:03
     
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