•  
  • Übersicht

    Land und Leute

    Why are there no all-way stops in Europe?

    Betrifft

    Why are there no all-way stops in Europe?

    Kommentar


    I've been driving in Germany for about 6 months now and have gotten used to the dreaded "Rechts hat die Vorfahrt" rule, but one thing I miss from Canada is the all-way stop. I just have to wonder why to all-way stop does not exist in Europe. I don't usually say this, but I really think that they are better, safer, simpler and make a log more sense than what you have here in Europe.

    In Canada when you come to a stop sign you stop and if it's an all-way stop everyone stops. You don't ignore them only part of the time, such as when a signal loses power like in Germany. When getting our driver's licenses we learn four simple rules. 1)Whoever arrives at the intersection first may go first after coming to a full stop. 2) If two cars arrive simultaneously then the car on the right goes first. 3) Rules 1 and 2 are not laws, but simply standard conventions. 4) Never assert the right of way as there is no right of way.

    With all-way stops being the norm in North America when traffic lights lose power those intersections are treated as all-way stops. Here is such a video of one in operation (or should I say out of operation?) in Texas:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6flstk6MLSY

    By not having an all-way stop rule in Europe the risk of things going wrong, i.e. accidents happening is greatly increased and you have weird setups where intersections with traffic lights are also fitted with stop, yield and priority road signs. What does the priority road sign even do to promote safety anyway? Why do these signs even exist? If they all disappeared there would probably be even less accidents as idiots would no longer have an excuse to assert the right of way as aggressively as they currently do.

    VerfasserFloction (872731) 08 Sep. 12, 10:39
    Kommentar
    When you say 'Europe' you mean 'Germany', right?

    The system is different because the system is different. People here have no problems with it as it's how they learnt to drive. If there were more accidents using one system and not another that would be in the news, and would soon be changed.

    idiots would no longer have an excuse to assert the right of way as aggressively as they currently do
    I'm not sure what you mean by 'aggressive'. If you have the right of way, whether because of a stop sign or other signs, how is it aggressive not to stop?
    #1VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 08 Sep. 12, 10:46
    Kommentar
    An einer unbeschilderten Kreuzung muss man je nach den Sichtverhältnissen auf jeden Fall anhalten, denn man hat zwar Vorfahrt, falls jemand von links kommt, aber man muss sich zugleich vergewissern, ob nicht jemand von rechts kommt.

    Bei guten Sichtverhältnissen hingegen ist es schlicht überflüssig, anzuhalten.

    #2VerfasserStarost (825755) 08 Sep. 12, 10:56
    Kommentar
    Weird setups where intersections with traffic lights are also fitted with stop, yield and priority road signs. ... Why do these signs even exist?

    Wenn die Ampel aus ist, gelten eben die Schilder, was ist daran seltsam?
    #3VerfasserMr Chekov (DE) (522758) 08 Sep. 12, 11:07
    Kommentar
    Weird setups where intersections with traffic lights are also fitted with stop, yield and priority road signs. ... Why do these signs even exist?

    It's called belt-and-braces (and I think is a purely German thing).

    I've experienced the all-way stop in Canada, but only in small towns. It works there because (a) there's not much traffic, (b) the towns are built on a grid pattern where the cross-roads are right-angular, and all the drivers can see all the others.

    On a related topic, my daughter pointed out an 'end of speed limit' sign in Devon on a road that was about two metres wide and full of bends, and remarked: 'We can now go faster than on any Canadian highway.' ('Can' in the sense of 'dürfen', of course!)
    #4Verfasserescoville (237761) 08 Sep. 12, 12:23
    Kommentar
    Here in Dresden the road markings are often very unclear due to cobbles, etc. so signs are the main way to tell whether you have to stop.
    #5VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 08 Sep. 12, 12:33
    Kommentar
    I've never heard of an "all-way stop". I take it it isn't used in UK English, right? The term wouldn't be immediately understandable to Brits, IMO.
    #6VerfasserKinkyAfro (587241) 08 Sep. 12, 12:38
    Kommentar
    I don't know what we call them; it's just an intersection where no-one has right of way, and everyone has to stop. In the UK you'd usually have a roundabout for that purpose.

    Here's a nice humorous description of this simple system:
    http://www.jimloy.com/humor/fourway.htm
    #7VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 08 Sep. 12, 12:42
    Kommentar
    @Mr Chekov (DE) #3 Wenn die Ampel aus ist, gelten eben die Schilder, was ist daran seltsam?

    Wenn eine Ampel aus ist müssen alle Autos in alle Richtungen anhalten. Die Kreuzung wird ann automatisch ein All-Way-Stop. Es gibt keine extra Schilder, die nur gelten, wenn die Ampel ausfällt. (Das Video zeigt es an)

    In Kanada, (und ich denke auch in den USA) haben wir dieses Schild überhaupt nicht. Und auch nichts ähnliches: http://tinyurl.com/crcrjcc

    Bitte, sage mir jemand, warum es dieses Schild in gibt? Wenn sie morgen alle verschwunden würden, würde es mehrere oder weniger Unfälle geben? Dieses Schild schafft nichts für die Sicherheit.


    @KinkyAfro
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All-way_stop
    #8VerfasserFloction (872731) 08 Sep. 12, 12:48
    Kommentar
    The sign is there so you know you have priority, and can keep driving without stopping every minute or two (e.g. in residential areas). Those who don't have priority have stop signs; those who do have this sign. Do you think they should get rid of stop signs too, and everyone should always have to stop at every junction? (Not a sarcastic question; I don't get what it is you want.)

    In the UK, there are road markings to show you that you have priority (we also don't have the yellow diamond). Here, for example: http://goo.gl/maps/WJX4B the driver on the main road can see he has priority as long as there are no lines blocking his path.

    Wenn eine Ampel aus ist müssen alle Autos in alle Richtungen anhalten. Die Kreuzung wird ann automatisch ein All-Way-Stop. Es gibt keine extra Schilder, die nur gelten, wenn die Ampel ausfällt.
    Surely this slows down traffic enormously? Is that system even used on busy roads?
    #9VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 08 Sep. 12, 12:56
    Kommentar
    For further illustration, here's a small German road where there is no yellow diamond before a street entering from the right: http://goo.gl/maps/sknxK
    Because there's no yellow diamond, you on the bigger road have to stop and let a car out if you see one approaching. Rechts vor links applies when there's no sign.

    On a big, busy, fast road, obviously it would be no good if you had to stop and let out cars from the side roads all the time, so you have the yellow diamond.

    Why all that bother? Why all the bother of road markings in the UK or Canada? (Note there are no road markings in this example.) It's a different system and has its own logic.
    #10VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 08 Sep. 12, 13:04
    Kommentar
    Floction, ich habe nie verstanden, wofür all-way-stops gut sind.

    Man muss immer anhalten, auch mitten in der Nacht, wenn die Kreuzung gut einsehrbar ist. Und das alle zwei Minuten.
    Außerdem kann es immer Situationen geben, in denen nicht klar ist, wer zuerst da war. Dann gibt es Meinungsverschiedenheiten darüber, wer nun Vorfahrt hat.
    Warum sollte die Regel "rechts hat Vorfahrt" nur dann gelten?

    Ich finde es viel sinnvoller, wenn immer nur aus den Richtungen der Autos klar ist, wer Vorfahrt hat.
    Und dafür braucht es in Deutschland gar keine Schilder, es gilt "rechts vor links". Und zwar immer, bei Ausnahmen müssen alle Richtungen Schilder haben, die die Vorfahrt regeln.
    Für diese Regelungen gibt es meist einen Grund, etwa Straßen, die deutlich mehr benutzt werden als andere. Diese sollten dann auch Vorfahrt haben, damit es nicht zum Stau kommt.

    Stop-Schilder sind in Deutschland relativ selten, an den meisten Kreuzungen steht nur "Vorfahrt gewähren".
    Im Normalfall muss man also nur dann anhalten, wenn ein anderes Auto Vorfahrt hat. Das finde ich wesentlich praktischer als das System in den USA, wo man oft alle 100 Meter anhalten muss.
    #11VerfasserDodolina (379349) 08 Sep. 12, 14:27
    Kommentar
    Wouldn't it be nice if occasionally the people who ask 'Why [is something here different to where I come from]?' really wanted to know why? But usually the question just seems to mean: 'I think it's stupid [that things are different to where I come from] and I just wanted to let you know', because all the explanations never seem to make any difference. Wouldn't it be nice if the OP sometimes said: 'Oh, I see now. Yes, that makes sense. Very interesting.'?
    #12VerfasserGibson (418762) 08 Sep. 12, 14:52
    Kommentar
    I think it takes a few years to sink in :-)
    #13VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 08 Sep. 12, 14:53
    Kommentar
    Stimmt, Gibson
    Ich habe eben bewusst so formuliert, dass meiner Meinung nach auch all-way stops ihre Schwächen haben. Jedes System hat eben Stärken und Schwächen.

    Ich akzeptiere das amerikanische System ja auch.
    Aus der jeweils anderen Sicht sieht man halt eher die Schwächen. Gerade im Verkehr, da lernt man die Regeln ja von klein auf und es fällt schwer, sich an ein neues System zu gewöhnen. Die eigenen Regeln, die man als Kind gelernt hat, so sind einfach zu selbstverständlich.
    #14VerfasserDodolina (379349) 08 Sep. 12, 14:58
    Kommentar
    Floction, you know how don't you get sliced, soft, thin, moist, square loaves of bread in Germany? And how that's annoying when you want to make proper sandwiches? It's a similar case, I think: in Germany, people don't want to make so many sandwiches; they eat hot meals at work and school, and have open-topped 'sandwiches' in the evening, on a plate. So they like nice firm, thick bread that doesn't bend when you lift your open-top sandwich. Or maybe they make those sandwiches because their bread is so firm? The whole system is different, so it has different elements. Germans get annoyed about our thin, squishy bread as they want to make open-top sandwiches, and we get annoyed about their firm, hard bread as we want too make 'proper' sandwiches. If we all just gave in to the new system and changed our eating habits and expectations we wouldn't get annoyed.
    #15VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 08 Sep. 12, 14:59
    Kommentar
    There ought to be a Kübler-Ross model on living in a foreign country. Or perhaps there is and I just have not found it yet. Maybe we should start a thread in which we crystallize our experiences and define a few stages: anticipation, bewilderment, terror, relief, etc.
    #16VerfasserSD3 (451227) 08 Sep. 12, 15:13
    Kommentar
    I am Canadian (0ntario, but have also lived in Quebec) and hate 4-way stops. (actually never heard them called all-way stops)
    It's true that there are unwritten rules about how to proceed at those intersections, but I find that an increasing number of people (dare I say fools/idiots?), either don't know or won't observe these rules.
    So even in this country, there are different ways of doing things.
    That's just how the cookie crumbles.

    Our new flavour of the year (in s-w Ontario anyway), are roundabouts, which are the bane of my existence. They can be practical, but most people do not know how to navigate them, they are accidents waiting to happen, and there are so many of them popping up short distances from each other that I'm starting to think that the Ministry of Transport got a special on the construction cost. (probably way cheaper than lights too)

    So you're in Germany now - go with the flow - no pun intended :) :)
    #17VerfasserRES-can (330291) 08 Sep. 12, 15:27
    Kommentar
    Roundabouts baut man in Germany seit einigen Jahren auch verstärkt. Anfangs hatten die Autofahrer auch Schwierigkeiten damit - Vorfahrt hat, wer drin ist, was eigentlich gegen die rechts-vor-links Regel verstößt - aber inzwischen haben sich die Leute gut daran gewöhnt und der Verkehr fließt besser, weil man zwar langsam fahren muß, aber eben nicht ganz abbremsen.
    #18Verfasserbluesky (236159) 08 Sep. 12, 15:52
    Kommentar
    #19Verfasservero (230412) 08 Sep. 12, 15:52
    Kommentar
    @18: Schön wär's. Da kaum jemand blinkt, wenn er rausfährt, ist der ganze Vorteil des Verkehrsflusses dahin, weil man eben doch stoppen und warten muss. Ich finde, die Deutschen haben das noch nicht so raus mit dem Kreisverkehr.

    Ich fände es auch eigentlich gut, beim reinfahren zu blinken, aber das würde dann vermutlich völlig überfordern ;).
    #20VerfasserGibson (418762) 08 Sep. 12, 16:05
    Kommentar
    Beim Reinfahren blinken wäre "WAHNSINN", weil jeder annehmen würde, dass derjenige gleich bei der nächsten Ausfahrt wieder rausfährt...

    Ich fand die 4-way stops meistens ziemlich nervig, habe aber den Eindruck gewonnen, dass gern irgendwelche Sheriffs in der Nähe standen zum Kassieren.

    Die meisten Deutschen sind ja schon beim "grünen Pfeil" überfordert, was aber in USA ungeschriebene Regel ist, da steht ein extra Schild, wenn das rechts abbiegen bei Rot verboten ist.

    Alles Gewohnheits- und Lern-Sache...
    Es soll ja auch Leute geben, die behaupten, dass in GB und AUS (und ein paar anderen Ländern) auf der "richtigen" Seite gefahren wird.
    #21Verfasserwaltherwithh (554696) 08 Sep. 12, 16:23
    Kommentar
    Gibson, ich finde die vielen neuen Kreisel umgemein praktisch. Ich fahre oft "über die Dörfer", und ich ärgere mich zwar auch über Nichtblinker, aber insgesamt klappt das recht gut.

    Floction, an Ampeln sind keine anderen Schilder als an anderen Kreuzungen. Aber natürlich findest du Ampeln nur an größeren, verkehrsreichen Kreuzungen, die oft zusätzliche Regelungen erfordern. Wenn sich dort zwei gleich viel befahrene Straßen kreuzen, gilt bei ausgeschalteter Ampel einfach rechts vor links.

    Zu dem Aspekt des Aufwachsens mit einer bestimmten Verkehrskultur: Vor Jahren habe ich einmal gelesen, dass es in Israel extrem hohe Zahlen an Verkehrstoten gibt, insbesondere an überfahrenen Fußgängern, weil ständig Einwanderer aus Ländern mit ganz unterschiedlichen Gepflogenheiten im Straßenverkehr kommen und es eben keine gemeinsame Verkehrskultur gibt.

    EDIT: Ich stimme waltherwithh vollinhaltlich zu.
    #22VerfasserRaudona (255425) 08 Sep. 12, 16:26
    Kommentar
    Beim Reinfahren blinken wäre "WAHNSINN", weil jeder annehmen würde, dass derjenige gleich bei der nächsten Ausfahrt wieder rausfährt...

    Komisch, in England funktioniert das... Walther, dafür gibt es Regeln:
    rechts blinken: ich verlasse den KV sofort wieder.
    nicht blinken: ich fahre geradeaus
    links blinken: ich fahre einmal rum (biege also quasi links ab)

    Ein anderer, gefährlicherer Nebeneffekt des Nichtblinkens ist, dass Leute gerne annehmen, dass ich rausfahre, obwohl ich das gar nicht vorhabe, und mir dauernd fast ins Auto fahren. Würde ich links blinken, würde das nicht passieren, weil man wüßte, dass ich nicht wie alle anderen auf die Hauptstraße fahre, sondern eine weiter.
    #23VerfasserGibson (418762) 08 Sep. 12, 16:28
    Kommentar
    @ Gibson

    Dann muss man aber bei jedem anderen Verkehrsteilnehmer vor und im Kreisel wissen, von woher er in den Kreisel einfuhr. Da den Überblick zu behalten, stelle ich mir bei entsprechender Verkehrsdichte unpraktikabel vor. Das einzige, was mich doch als Verkehrsteilnehmer, der in einen Kreisel einfahren will, interessiert, ist, ob der im Kreisel, der grade als nächster kommt, drin bleibt - egal, wo er dann abbiegt - oder ob er rausfährt und ich eine Lücke zum reinfahren habe. Und genau letzteres wird durch sein Blinken beim Rausfahren - und nur dadurch - ermöglicht.

    Übrigens finde ich es als jemand, der das studiert hat, ziemlich ulkig, wie nahezu jeder Führerscheininhaber glaubt, schon per Teilnahme am Straßenverkehr der geborene Verkehrsplaner zu sein. Das ist etwa so, als würde einen eine durchlittene Blinddarm-OP dazu inspirieren, diesen Eingriff in Zukunft selbst bei sich oder Dritten vornehmen zu können.
    #24VerfasserStarost (825755) 08 Sep. 12, 16:43
    Kommentar
    @Gibson: im Prinzip bestätigst du genau was ich sage, Gewohnheit und Lernen - und sich an die Regeln halten, die im jeweiligen Land gelten, sonst funktioniert es nicht. Leider sind die Sitten in Deutschland in dieser Hinsicht am "Aussterben"...
    #25Verfasserwaltherwithh (554696) 08 Sep. 12, 16:45
    Kommentar
    #24: Übrigens finde ich es als jemand, der das studiert hat, ziemlich ulkig, wie nahezu jeder Führerscheininhaber glaubt, schon per Teilnahme am Straßenverkehr der geborene Verkehrsplaner zu sein. Es gibt doch auch Millionen Bundestrainer in Deutschland ;-)

    Nee, im Ernst: Als Verkehrsplanerin sehe ich mich nicht. Beispiel: Eine Bekannte wünschte sich einen Spiegel für die Ausfahrt aus ihrer sehr engen, unübersichtlichen Wohnstraße. Das wurde mit der Begründung abgelehnt, damit würden Radfahrer leichter übersehen. Auf die Idee wäre ich als Laiin nicht gekommen, aber ich fand die Erklärung einleuchtend. Andererseits merke ich als Verkehrsteilnehmerin natürlich, ob etwas FÜR MICH funktioniert oder nicht. Ich habe ja auch gemerkt, als meine Blinddarmoperation Komplikationen nach sich zog.
    #26VerfasserRaudona (255425) 08 Sep. 12, 16:50
    Kommentar
    Dann muss man aber bei jedem anderen Verkehrsteilnehmer vor und im Kreisel wissen, von woher er in den Kreisel einfuhr.
    Starost, wieso? Wer links blinkt, bleibt im Kreisverkehr (bis er an seine Ausfahrt kommt, dann blinkt er natürlich rechts), wer rechts blinkt, fährt raus.

    Aber ich habe ja gesagt, dass das in D vermutlich nicht einzuführen ist, da ist eben keine kulturelle Basis. Ich wäre ja auch vollkommen glücklich, wenn die Leute überhaupt blinken würden (und nicht nur im Kreisverkehr; blinken scheint überhaupt auch eine aussterbende Angewohnheit zu sein. Was, wenn ich den Gedanken weiterverfolge, geradewegs in ranting and raving über die zunehmende Rücksichtslosigkeit und Andere-nehme-ich-gar-nicht-wahr-Einstellung führt, mein momentanes Lieblingsaufregthema, aber das ersprare ich euch;) ).
    #27VerfasserGibson (418762) 08 Sep. 12, 17:01
    Kommentar
    Mir fällt gerade etwas ein bzw. auf: Gibson schreibt, dass wir Deutschen das noch nicht so raushaben mit dem Kreisverkehr. Ich (geboren in den Sechzigern) bin in Hannover mit Kreiseln aufgewachsen; vielleicht haben wir in dieser Gegend deshalb weniger Probleme damit?

    OT: Auf einem dieser Kreisel stand bis in die Siebzigerjahre ein Verkehrspolizist mit langem weißem Mantel. Das ist der Einzige, den ich jemals außerhalb von historischen Verkehrserziehungsbilderbüchern gesehen habe ...
    #28VerfasserRaudona (255425) 08 Sep. 12, 17:06
    Kommentar
    Das kann gut sein. Mir ist der erste Kreisel in D irgendwann in den Neunzigern begegnet (und ich bin prompt falschrum reingefahren), und so richtig inflationär erst seit ein paar Jahren.

    Also gibt es Grund zum Optimismus? Ein paar kurze Jahrzehnte, und dann klappt's?
    #29VerfasserGibson (418762) 08 Sep. 12, 17:13
    Kommentar
    Auf einem dieser Kreisel stand bis in die Siebzigerjahre ein Verkehrspolizist mit langem weißem Mantel

    Was macht denn ein Verkehrspolizist auf einem Kreisverkehr? Zwischen den Blumenbeeten spazierengehen?
    #30VerfasserLady Grey (235863) 08 Sep. 12, 17:15
    Kommentar
    Als Kanadier, sollte man meinen, wäre es doch viel besser, sich darüber aufzuregen, dass zumindest in Teilen Europa auf der falschen Seite gefahren wird. Das ist doch vermutlich für einen Kanadier viel gefährlicher als die Abwesenheit von "all-way stops."
    #31Verfasserdude (253248) 08 Sep. 12, 17:19
    Kommentar
    Naja, in Europa nur noch auf Inseln, Malta und GB und IRL...
    Aber Japan, Indien und Australien haben ja auch etwas Verkehr...
    #32Verfasserwaltherwithh (554696) 08 Sep. 12, 17:25
    Kommentar
    Lady, der Polizist hat halt den Verkehr geregelt: Mit ausgestreckten Armen zeigte er an, von welcher Seite gerade gefahren werden durfte. Ich habe nur ein Foto gefunden, das in etwa meiner Erinnerung entspricht, bezeichnenderweise aus Hannover: http://www.haz.de/Hannover/Aus-den-Stadtteile...
    #33VerfasserRaudona (255425) 08 Sep. 12, 17:32
    Kommentar
    @dude... in my visits to Europe, including lengthier stays in both Germany and France, I have found the infrastructure to be so excellent that I had no use for a car....
    but I do agree that driving on the "wrong side" could potentially be fatal for all :) :)

    stop signs. roundabouts, etc. are only a small inconvenience in comparison IMHO - and can be learned easily enough
    #34VerfasserRES-can (330291) 08 Sep. 12, 17:36
    Kommentar
    The point I was trying to make was that as someone who has driven in truly chaotic places in terms of traffic - Mexico City comes to mind as probably the most chaotic I've ever had to deal with, followed very closely by Lahore or Mumbai - the mere absence of all-way stops signs strikes me as relatively minor a problem, not to say laughable. :-)
    #35Verfasserdude (253248) 08 Sep. 12, 17:46
    Kommentar
    And why are there no magic roundabouts in Germany, for safety and throughput?

    http://www.cbrd.co.uk/indepth/magicroundabout/
    #36VerfasserMikeE (236602) 08 Sep. 12, 18:04
    Kommentar
    OT@vero: Thank you. That covers it pretty well.
    #37VerfasserSD3 (451227) 08 Sep. 12, 18:09
    Kommentar
    Meiner Beobachtung nach, wird an Kreisverkehren noch am ehesten geblinkt, im Gegensatz zum sonstigen Straßenverkehr (weil die linke Hand ja fürs Handy gebraucht wird).
    #38Verfasserbluesky (236159) 08 Sep. 12, 18:27
    Kommentar
    #36, Bist du des Wahnsinns, Mike? :-D
    (Wieviele Radfahrer werden da jedes Jahr plattgefahren? Schade, dass ich den letztes Jahr nicht besucht habe, aber wir hatten in Swindon keine Zeit mehr).
    #39VerfasserGuggstDu (427193) 08 Sep. 12, 19:42
    Kommentar
    I'm afraid cyclists take their life in their own hands in the UK ... :-O
    #40VerfasserKinkyAfro (587241) 08 Sep. 12, 21:01
    Kommentar
    In Malta regelt man das viel einfacher. All-stop? Rechts vor links? Ach was. Dort wird gehupt, wenn man auf eine Kreuzung zufährt. Von jedem. Auch in der Dunkelheit. Besonders eindrucksvoll in La Valletta zu besichtigen, wo die Kreuzungen im Schachbrettmuster liegen.

    Der eindrucksvollste Kreisel dagegen begegnete mir in Porto. Er hat vier Spuren und ist im 90-Grad-Winkel von Ampeln unterbrochen. Wir haben drei Vollkreise auf der innersten Spur gezogen, bis ich endlich als erster an einer roten Ampel ankam und bei Gelb mit einem Kavalierstart nach schräg rechts rüberzog, weil das der einzige Weg schien, da jemals wieder rauszukommen!
    #41VerfasserRestitutus (765254) 08 Sep. 12, 21:50
    Kommentar
    #40: Ja, rate mal wo ich meinen einzigen Fahrradunfall in 40 Jahren hatte. In London. Im Kreisverkehr. Mit einem weißen Lieferwagen... (der dann auch noch abgehauen ist).
    Ich glaube, alles was kein Auto ist, lebt dort gefährlich. In GB wird von allen Beteiligten angenommen, die Straße gehört den Autos (auch wenn vermutlich im Highway Code was anderes steht). Das war mein Fehler, ich habe angenommen, wenn ich mich wie ein Fahrzeug benehme (Motorradführerschein) und den Kreisverkehr ordentlich befahre, werde ich auch als Fahrzeug/Verkehrsteilnehmer anerkannt.
    #42VerfasserGuggstDu (427193) 08 Sep. 12, 22:01
    Kommentar
    (bissl OT wieder) @guggstDu - wann war denn das? ich fahr seint 8 Jahren unfallfrei in London. Will nicht sagen, dass es nicht ungefährlich oder perfekt ist, aber es hat sich um einiges gebessert in der Zeit seit ich hier bin.
    #43Verfasservero (230412) 08 Sep. 12, 22:27
    Kommentar
    Ich glaube, dass für "überall" gilt: Anpassung, Rücksichtnahme und eine gewisse Disziplin erleichtern - nicht nur im Straßenverkehr - das Leben.
    Das schließt zwar nicht alle Unfälle aus, aber es könnten einige weniger sein.

    Wieviel Spuren hat der Kreisel am Arc de Triomphe in Paris? 7 oder 8?

    Gegen "weiße Lieferwagen" habe ich allmählich eine Allergie entwickelt und rechne fast immer mit dem "Schlimmsten", Fahrradkuriere sind eine ähnliche Kategorie...

    Es gibt immer wieder schwarze Schafe, aber es gibt auch viele Vorurteile - ich fahre keinen schwarzen BMW :-).
    Gerade auf Reisen im Ausland kann ich immer wieder beobachten, dass "Reisende" sich offenbar überhaupt nicht mit den Regelungen des Gastlandes beschäftigt haben.

    #44Verfasserwaltherwithh (554696) 09 Sep. 12, 08:00
    Kommentar
    Weiß ich nicht. In Paris fahr ich nur Metro. ;-)
    #45VerfasserRestitutus (765254) 09 Sep. 12, 11:33
    Kommentar
    ... with all due respect for national differences whether in road-junction layout or bread for sandwiches, I do wish that Germans could place their traffic lights so that the first person in the queue could see them without cricking his neck. (Either by another light on the opposite side of the junction (as in UK and Scandinavia), or by a smaller light at eye level (as in France).)
    #46Verfasserescoville (237761) 09 Sep. 12, 13:25
    Kommentar
    escoville, alles unnötig. Der erste an der Ampel fährt los, wenn die hinten hupen ;-)
    #47Verfassermanni3 (305129) 09 Sep. 12, 13:54
    Kommentar
    ein Verkehrspolizist mit langem weißem Mantel

    there was also always one on what is now the Willy-Brandt-Platz in Frankfurt many years ago...
    #48Verfassermikefm (760309) 09 Sep. 12, 14:14
    Kommentar
    "Wenn die Vorfahrt nicht durch Stop-Schilder oder Fahrbahn-Markierungen verdeutlicht ist, müssen sich die Autofahrer gegenseitig verständigen. Eine Rechts-vor-Links- oder Links-vor-Rechts-Regel gibt es nicht."

    I've mentioned that that to Germans; they tend not to believe it ;-)

    I believe it's one reason for the lower accident rates, one is forced to drive more cautiously on country roads and in suburbs
    #49Verfassermikefm (760309) 09 Sep. 12, 14:34
    Kommentar
    In the UK it used to be the case that in the absence of signage or markings, whoever was going straight ahead had the priority over anyone turning. If both drivers were going straight ahead, the one who drove into the side of the other was (reasonably enough) considered to be at fault. This may still be the case, but is largely academic, as pretty well all junctions are marked, even in the quietest suburbs and country villages.
    #50Verfasserescoville (237761) 09 Sep. 12, 17:50
    Kommentar
    Das fände ich sehr klug. Ich lebe in einem verwinkelten Einbahnstraßenviertel, in dem es oft Beinahekollisionen gibt, weil jemand unter Inanspruchnahme seines Rechts-hat-Vorfahrtsrechts aus einer winzigen Seitengasse geschossen kommt ohne Rücksicht darauf, wer da soeben geradeaus des Wegs fahren mag und kein Periskop hat, um um die Hausecke zu schielen. Und das deckt noch nicht die Kollisionen ab, derer ich schon Zeuge wurde, weil jemand aus einer Einfahrt kam, brav in die Einbahnenstraßenrichtung schaute und zu spät den falschherum kommenden Ortsfremden bemerkte, dem wieder mal entgangen war, dass die vermeintliche Durchgangsstraße nach der Einfahrt in die Tiefgarage eben plötzlich zur Einbahnstraße wird und er zum Erreichen eines bereits in Sichtweite liegenden Ziels noch einmal um 4 Häuserblöcke fahren müsste - daher auch die häufigen Handyanrufe verzweifelter Erstbesucher, die vermeintlich schon alle Möglichkeiten durchprobiert haben, um uns zu finden ...
    #51VerfasserRestitutus (765254) 09 Sep. 12, 20:49
    Kommentar
    Restitutus, falls du in FFM wohnst, würde Umziehen helfen. - Die Frankfurter sind m.E. aber auch wirklich selber schuld am Verkehrsinfarkt in ihrer City. -Hätten sie nach dem 2. Weltkrieg nicht auf Biegen und Brechen versucht, Bundeshauptstadt zu werden und deswegen die durch den Krieg zerstörte Innenstadt auf denselben Grundstücksgrenzen wie zuvor aufzubauen, dann sähe dort verkehrstechnisch so manches anders aus.

    Aber zum Problem des Einbiegens in eine andere Strasse mit Gegenverkehr auf der linken Spur:

    Dieses Phänomen beobachte ich relativ häufig an Einmündungen zu Strassen, in denen eine Buslinie verkehrt:

    Die Autofahrer aus der Seitenstrasse orientieren sich grundsätzlich nach links und biegen dann gerne nach rechts ab, ohne nochmals zu prüfen, ob sich dort nicht Gegenverkehr (Bus !!) auf der Überholspur nähert!
    #52VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 09 Sep. 12, 21:47
    Kommentar
    Warum sollte man im Kreisverkehr links blinken?
    Ist doch unnötig.
    Wer rein will, blinkt nicht.
    Wer raus will, blinkt rechts (sollte man zumindest, machen auch die wenigsten).
    Wer drin bleibt, blinkt nicht.
    Warum noch links blinken?

    Kreisverkehre müssen wohl für einen Großteil so kompliziert sein wie abknickende Vorfahrten...
    #53VerfasserMandalor (856590) 10 Sep. 12, 08:35
    Kommentar
    Mandalor

    Should you ever drive in the UK, on approaching a roundabout you are supposed to indicate the direction by which you will be leaving it. And on leaving it, you should blink left.

    In Germany you aren't supposed to do the first, though I find it helpful and always do. You are supposed to do the second (mutatis mutandis), though (infuriatingly) not many do. Germans (drivers and traffic planners alike) still haven't understood roundabouts.
    #54Verfasserescoville (237761) 10 Sep. 12, 09:07
    Kommentar
    Nein, ich wohne nicht in FFM, aber ich bin einmal die Woche dort, und das mit dem Verkehrsinfarkt sehe ich auch so: Grüne Welle beispielsweise ist dort ein nie gehörtes Fremdwort. Aber sich dann über den Feinstaub beschweren und Plakettenpflicht verhängen!

    In unserer Nähe gibt es allerdings eine breite Straße, die früher Durchgangsstraße war, ich fuhr sie jeden Tag zur Arbeit und zurück, dann aber einer - ich sage bewusst: so genannten - Verkehrsberuhigungsmaßnahme zum Opfer fiel: Tempo 30 und Abmontieren der Vorfahrtsstraßenschilder. Jetzt gibt es dort nicht nur ständig Unfälle, weil die Einbieger ihr neues Vorfahrtsrecht gegen die durchsetzen wollen, die eine breite gerade Straße automatisch für vorrangig ansehen, nicht nur ständig Staus, weil der Geradeausverkehr auf einen Einbieger warten muss, der seinerseits wegen des Gegenverkehrs nicht einbiegen kann, es ist auch zum Eldorado für die Blitzer geworden. Dass sich an genau dieser Straße die Autohändler reihen, macht die Sache erst richtig pikant ...

    Zumal die Wiesbadener nicht gerade für kluges Fahren bekannt sind. Die nach der Wiedervereinigung gemäß DDR-Vorbild eingeführten Rechtsabbiegerpfeile an den Ampeln mussten bald wieder abgeschafft werden, weil die Zahl der Unfälle sprunghaft zugenommen hatte. Das nennt man die Kapitulation des Staates vor der Doofheit seiner Bürger.
    #55VerfasserRestitutus (765254) 10 Sep. 12, 09:10
    Kommentar
    @alle: links blinken im Kreisverkehr

    Das tut man genau dann, wenn man im Kreisverkehr auf die nächstinnere Spur wechseln will. Das setzt natürlich einen mindestens zweispurigen Kreisverkehr voraus.

    rechts blinken beim Einfahren:

    Ist in DE verboten und in AT genau dann erlaubt (und erwünscht), wenn man an der nächsten Ausfahrt wieder ausfährt.
    #56VerfasserChris (AT) (237739) 10 Sep. 12, 10:01
    Kommentar
    @escoville:

    Natürlich blinkt man in UK links. Ist ja auch Linksverkehr.
    Und blinken beim Einfahren war hier in D ja auch zuerst Pflicht, WENN man die nächste Ausfahrt wieder raus wollte. Da aber auch Leute rechts geblinkt haben, wenn sie NICHT rauswollten, wurde das wieder abgeschafft, bzw. sogar verboten (Aha, der blinkt, also will der raus, dann kann ich ja fahren! *BUMM*)
    #57VerfasserMandalor (856590) 10 Sep. 12, 10:07
    Kommentar
    Ich muss gestehen, dass ich beim UK-Blinkmodus den Zusatznutzen nicht sehe. Wenn ich in den Kreisverkehr einfahre, will ich doch nur wissen, ob das Auto, das schon drin ist, vor mir rausfährt (also in diesem Falle links blinkt) oder mir in die Quere kommt. Ob es dabei rechts blinkt oder nicht, also noch eine Ausfahrt weiter fährt oder zwei, kann mir doch egal sein. Mal abgesehen davon, dass ich das auch nur weiß, wenn ich gesehen habe, wo derjenige in den Kreisverkehr eingefahren ist. Vielleicht kann mich hier jemand aufklären?
    #58VerfasserJanZ (805098) 10 Sep. 12, 10:19
    Kommentar
    rechts blinken beim Einfahren:

    Ist in DE verboten und in AT genau dann erlaubt (und erwünscht), wenn man an der nächsten Ausfahrt wieder ausfährt.


    Keine Ahnung, wie der Wortlaut der StVO dazu ist, aber das Rechtsblinken vor Einfahrt in den Kreisverkehr zu verbieten halte ich für ziemlich blödsinnig. Warum auch? Welche Art von Missverständnis könnte das verursachen? Viele Kreisel sind so klein, dass die Fahrstrecke zwischen Einfahrt und erster Ausfahrt gerade mal ein paar Meter beträgt, da fährt man praktisch schon wieder aus, bevor man richtig drin ist. In solchen Fällen blinke ich auch schon vor dem Kreisel, andernfalls könnte ich es mir ganz sparen.
    #59Verfasserdirk (236321) 10 Sep. 12, 10:29
    Kommentar
    Wie ich es schon geschrieben habe (#57):
    Es ist tatsächlich zu Unfällen gekommen, weil Leute beim Einfahren geblinkt haben, die NICHT sofort wieder raus wollten. Der an der nächsten Einfahrt dachte dann, das der andere sofort wieder raus will, fährt los, und *BUMM* gab´s den Crash.
    Und da diese Unfälle so häufig vorgekommen sind, gab es die Änderung, das im Kreisverkehr nur noch beim Ausfahren geblinkt werden darf.
    #60VerfasserMandalor (856590) 10 Sep. 12, 10:37
    Kommentar
    In Canada when you come to a stop sign you stop and if it's an all-way stop everyone stops.

    Um ehrlich zu sein habe ich den Sinn nie ganz verstanden. Wir haben ja auch keine Ampeln, die für alle Fahrtrichtungen rot zeigen.


    1)Whoever arrives at the intersection first may go first after coming to a full stop.

    Wir haben keine entsprechende Regel. Wer Stop hat, hat Wartepflicht. Andere, für die das nicht zutrifft, haben eben Vorrang. Wenn ein Fahrzeug stehen bleibt, verzichtet es auf seinen Vorrang. Man muss sich dann uU durch Zeichen oder Gesten verständigen, wer zuerst fahren darf. In der Praxis kommt bisweilen auch hier die Rechtsregel zur Anwendung, aber das ist gesetzlich streng genommen nicht gedeckt.

    By not having an all-way stop rule in Europe the risk of things going wrong, i.e. accidents happening is greatly increased

    Das glaube ich nicht. Ist wohl, wie so vieles, eine Frage der Gewohnheit bzw Verkehrserziehung. Kreuzungen, bei denen niemand Vorrang hat halte ich auch persönlich für nicht optimal.

    and you have weird setups where intersections with traffic lights are also fitted with stop, yield and priority road signs.

    Auch diese Verkehszeichen gelten nur für den Fall, dass die Verkehrslichtsignalanlage (SCNR) nicht funktioniert.

    What does the priority road sign even do to promote safety anyway?

    Es ist essentiell zu wissen, wenn man auf einer Vorrangstraße ist. Dort sind gewisse Dinge zB verboten -- und man hat, natürlich, Vorrang.
    #61VerfasserCarullus (670120) 10 Sep. 12, 11:01
    Kommentar
    Es ist tatsächlich zu Unfällen gekommen, weil Leute beim Einfahren geblinkt haben, die NICHT sofort wieder raus wollten.

    Actually the real reason is they were too close to the car in front, IMO; if one is too close to the vehicle in front accidents will happen; in roundbouts, on straight roads, blinking or not blinking...
    #62Verfassermikefm (760309) 10 Sep. 12, 11:06
    Kommentar
    Re #54: "Should you ever drive in the UK, on approaching a roundabout you are supposed to indicate the direction by which you will be leaving it."

    Das verstehe ich nicht: Soll das etwa heißen, dass man beim Einfahren in den Kreisverkehr mit den Armen wedeln soll, um anzuzeigen, dass man den "quarter to nine", den "twelve o'clock" oder den "quarter past three" Exit nehmen will ?!
    #63VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 10 Sep. 12, 11:15
    Kommentar
    Heute gibt es dafür anstelle der Arme den Blinker ;-)

    to indicate = blinken
    #64Verfasserpenguin (236245) 10 Sep. 12, 11:20
    Kommentar
    Meine Fragestellung bezog sich darauf, wie man bei der Einfahrt in den Kreisverkehr anzeigen könnte, welchen Exit man zu nehmen beabsichtigt!
    #65VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 10 Sep. 12, 11:29
    Kommentar
    Actually the real reason is they were too close to the car in front, IMO; if one is too close to the vehicle in front accidents will happen; in roundbouts, on straight roads, blinking or not blinking...

    In diesem Fall dürften die Leute in den Kreisverkehr eingefahren sein, weil sie dachten, derjenige, der blinkt, fährt raus, was er dann aber nicht tat. Durch etwas längeres Warten hätten sich diese Unfälle vermeiden lassen, zumal man sich ja aufs Blinken allein nicht verlassen darf. Andererseits hält das natürlich den Verkehrsfluss auf.
    #66VerfasserJanZ (805098) 10 Sep. 12, 11:30
    Kommentar
    Meine Fragestellung bezog sich darauf, wie man bei der Einfahrt in den Kreisverkehr anzeigen könnte, welchen Exit man zu nehmen beabsichtigt!

    Schon richtig, mit dem Blinker!

    1. Ausfahrt = links blinken
    2. Ausfahrt = nicht blinken
    3. Ausfahrt = rechts blinken

    und das dann jeweils so lange, bis man die Ausfahrt vor derjenigen passiert hat, die man nehmen will. Dann blinkt man links. Wie es bei Kreisverkehren mit mehr als vier Zufahrten geregelt ist, müsste ich im Highway Code nachgucken (weiß nicht, ob der online verfügbar ist).
    #67VerfasserJanZ (805098) 10 Sep. 12, 11:32
    Kommentar
    Actually the real reason is they were too close to the car in front
    Etwas, was mich an deutschen Autofahrern echt nervt, ist ihr horror vacui. Sobald man z.B. im Stau eine Lücke lässt, um nicht alle zwei Sekunden zwischen Gas und Bremse zu wechseln oder sich kaputtzukuppeln, oder in der Stadt einen mit bloßem Auge erkennbaren Abstand zum Vordermann lässt, muss da jemand reinfahren. Der durch das Abstandlassen erzeugte verbesserte Verkehrsfluss wirkt auf den deutschen Autofahrer magisch anziehend, aber wie so oft in Kunst und Leben zerstört er ihn gerade deshalb.
    #68Verfasserigm (387309) 10 Sep. 12, 11:33
    Kommentar
    @JanZ,#66:
    Genau so war es.

    @JanZ, #67:
    Das ist doch jetzt ironisch gemeint, oder? Soll man da echt mal links, mal rechts blinken, je nachdem, wie man jetzt raus will? Finde ich schon etwas übertrieben.
    #69VerfasserMandalor (856590) 10 Sep. 12, 11:35
    Kommentar
    #65: Na ja, zumindest beim üblichen 4-Wege-Kreisel dürfte es möglich sein, mit dem Blinker die Ausfahrtabsicht anzuzeigen: rechts = erste Ausfahrt, links = dritte Ausfahrt, gar nicht blinke = zweite Ausfahrt (gültig für Rechtsverkehr). Schwieriger wird es natürlich bei Mehrwegkreiseln.

    #66: Wer im Kreisel rechts blinkt meint: an der nächsten Ausfahrt, die ich erreiche, fahre ich raus. Wer weiter will, muss natürlich den Blinker rechtzeitig ausschalten. Wo liegt denn das Problem? Ich sehe nicht, wie das Missverständnisse provozieren könnte.
    #70Verfasserdirk (236321) 10 Sep. 12, 11:36
    Kommentar
    #66 Andererseits hält das natürlich den Verkehrsfluss auf.

    But a possible accident causes even greater delays...
    #71Verfassermikefm (760309) 10 Sep. 12, 11:42
    Kommentar
    Re #67: Danke, Jan! - Endlich jemand, der mich versteht! - ;-))

    Wenn du schon in den Highway-Code schaust, dann schau doch bitte auch gleich nach den Ersatz-Handzeichen, die Falle des Ausfalls des Blinkers zu gebeb sind und m.W. immer noch gültig sind, wie z.B.

    Rechter Arm aus dem Fenster gehalten

    gerade gehalten (gestreckt): Rechts abbiegen
    nach oben gewinkelt: Links abbiegen
    nach unten gewinkelt: ?

    (oder was immer es war)
    #72VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 10 Sep. 12, 11:42
    Kommentar
    #54: you should blink left

    #62: blinking or not blinking

    Do we use "blinking" for this in the UK? As penguin points out in #64, this is indicating in UK English, AFAIK.
    #73VerfasserKinkyAfro (587241) 10 Sep. 12, 11:43
    Kommentar
    Aalso, damit ihr's mir bzw. den hier anwesenden Briten glaubt, hier der Link zum Highway Code: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/TravelAndTranspor... , Nr. 186. Nachtrag für Teddy-Toe: die Handzeichen stehen hier: http://www.direct.gov.uk/prod_consum_dg/group...

    Wer im Kreisel rechts blinkt meint: an der nächsten Ausfahrt, die ich erreiche, fahre ich raus. Wer weiter will, muss natürlich den Blinker rechtzeitig ausschalten. Wo liegt denn das Problem? Ich sehe nicht, wie das Missverständnisse provozieren könnte.

    Weil viele eben nicht "den Blinker rechtzeitig ausschalten", zumal die Zeit, in der man den Blinker ausschalten müsste, bei den meisten Kreisverkehren sehr kurz ist. Umgekehrt gibt es kein Missverständnis, wenn man beim Einfahren nicht blinkt, denn da gibt es ja nur eine mögliche Richtung, in die man fahren kann.
    #74VerfasserJanZ (805098) 10 Sep. 12, 11:43
    Kommentar
    Umgekehrt gibt es kein Missverständnis, wenn man beim Einfahren nicht blinkt, denn da gibt es ja nur eine mögliche Richtung, in die man fahren kann.

    Klar, und das Blinken ist dafür auch nicht notwendig. Wer allerdings sofort wieder rechts raus will, komt gar nicht zum blinken, wenn er den Blinker erst nach Einfahrt in den kreisel setzt.
    #75Verfasserdirk (236321) 10 Sep. 12, 11:48
    Kommentar
    blinking or not blinking

    Kinky, it's Denglish, but in the other direction, I'd say :-)
    #76Verfassermikefm (760309) 10 Sep. 12, 11:48
    Kommentar
    @dirk, #75:
    Du sollst auch nicht immer mit 120 durch die Kreisverkehre durchorgeln! ;-)
    Bei 50 hat man alle Zeit der Welt...
    #77VerfasserMandalor (856590) 10 Sep. 12, 11:55
    Kommentar
    Nicht in den winzigen Kreisverkehren hier in Aschaffenburg ;).
    #78VerfasserJanZ (805098) 10 Sep. 12, 11:57
    Kommentar
    #76: Kinky, it's Denglish, but in the other direction, I'd say :-)

    Sometimes things are just so blinking confusing, aren't they? ;-)
    #79VerfasserKinkyAfro (587241) 10 Sep. 12, 11:58
    Kommentar
    The British logic is as follows:

    A roundabout is basically an intersection. When approaching an intersection, you blink to indicate which direction you intend to take (unless you are going straight on). Once in the roundabout, the exits are in effect side roads, so you blink (in the UK with the left blinker) to indicate when you are going to take the next one.

    The only dangerous thing you can do is indicate prematurely that you are leaving the roundabout.

    Incidentally I've never seen the point of the orange diamond. No one needs to know they're on a priority road, only that they're not.
    #80Verfasserescoville (237761) 10 Sep. 12, 12:06
    Kommentar
    @escoville:
    Und in D hatm an das Blinken beim reinfahren eben weggelassen, die Richtung ist ja klar, man kann ja nur rechtsrum in einen Kreisverkehr einfahren.

    Und zum "orange diamond": Wenn ich die Schilder sehe, weiß ich, das ich Vorfahrt habe und kann durch den Ort mit gleicher Geschwindigkeit durchfahren, spart Sprit, Lärm, und Nerven.
    #81VerfasserMandalor (856590) 10 Sep. 12, 12:11
    Kommentar
    No one needs to know they're on a priority road, only that they're not.

    I am not familiar with the UK rules and regulations, but in Austria, to give a random example, it is essential to know. Being on a priority road means you may pass other cars even on the intersection, but u-turns are usually forbidden (except at a traffic light), no night-time parking outside of cities, etc. There's a whole bunch of things you may / must not do on priority roads.
    #82VerfasserCarullus (670120) 10 Sep. 12, 12:16
    Kommentar
    #61 Carullus:

    "and you have weird setups where intersections with traffic lights are also fitted with stop, yield and priority road signs."

    Auch diese Verkehszeichen gelten nur für den Fall, dass die Verkehrslichtsignalanlage (SCNR) nicht funktioniert.


    Das ist nicht der eigentliche Grund für die Tafeln, denn dass die Ampel ausfällt, sollte wohl die absolute Ausnahme sein. Vielmehr werden diese Ampeln zu verkehrsarmen Zeiten - sprich nachts - bewusst abgeschaltet, und dann gelten eben die Tafeln.
    #83VerfasserChris (AT) (237739) 10 Sep. 12, 12:27
    Kommentar
    Re #75: "Wer allerdings sofort wieder rechts raus will, kommt gar nicht zum blinken"
    Re #77: "Du sollst auch nicht immer mit 120 durch die Kreisverkehre durchorgeln!"

    Es gäbe noch eine andere Lösung für eine ausreichende Anzahl an Blinksignalen:

    Man erhöhe die Blinkfrequenz von z.Zt. ca. 1/2 Hertz af 2 Hertz!
    #84VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 10 Sep. 12, 12:30
    Kommentar
    JanZ, Nr. 74: Das ist UK, nicht wahr? Mein Mann hat Anfang des Jahres die California driver's licence erwerben müssen, um ein Auto kaufen zu dürfen (bzw. es fahren zu dürfen). Wir sind dann später durch 9 Bundesstaaten gereist, und bei allen hat er sich gefragt, ob jetzt diese oder jene Regelung hier auch gilt... (Beispiel: Bei Rot rechts abbiegen dürfen, wenn es nicht ausdrücklich verboten ist.) ;)
    #85Verfasservirus (343741) 10 Sep. 12, 12:34
    Kommentar
    Das ist nicht der eigentliche Grund für die Tafeln, denn dass die Ampel ausfällt, sollte wohl die absolute Ausnahme sein. Vielmehr werden diese Ampeln zu verkehrsarmen Zeiten - sprich nachts - bewusst abgeschaltet, und dann gelten eben die Tafeln.

    Ja, das war undeutlich formuliert. Im Ergebnis sind wir uns ja einig, die Tafeln gelten nur subsidiär zur Ampel.
    #86VerfasserCarullus (670120) 10 Sep. 12, 12:38
    Kommentar
    @#77: Da muss man gar nicht 120 fahren. Nehmen wir mal - als typisches Beispiel - diesen Kreisel. Ich komme von Süden und will nach Osten weiter, also gleich rechts wieder raus. Die Fahrstrecke "im" Kreisverkehr - soweit man das überhaupt sinnvoll definieren kann - beträgt dabei weniger als 10 m, was bei Tempo 25 einer Verweildauer von gut einer Sekunde entspricht.
    #87Verfasserdirk (236321) 10 Sep. 12, 12:42
    Kommentar
    Re #86: Wobei anzumerken ist, dass auch die Ampeln ihrerseits, selbst, wenn sie in Betrieb sind, lediglich subsidiär zu von Menschen gegebenen Zeichen sind.

    Typisches Beispiel: Handzeichenregelung durch Verkehrspolizisten nach Unfall auf einer Kreuzung.
    #88VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 10 Sep. 12, 12:42
    Kommentar
    Ich finde, es wäre eine unglaublich praktische Erfindung, wenn wir zusätzlich zu den gelben Richtungsblinkern noch andere farbige Blinker hätten. Zum Beispiel gibt es keine grünen Blinklichter an Autos, was auch ich vom aesthetischen Standpunkt her sehr schade finde. Mir schwebt so etwas vor: http://alltheautoworld.blogspot.ch/2011/06/el... , wodurch Autofahrer endlich in die Lage versetzt würden, auch in topologisch komplexen Kreiseln auf differenzierte Weise anzugeben in welche Richtung sie unterwegs sind.
    #89Verfasserzirp_ (703877) 10 Sep. 12, 12:57
    Kommentar
    Zirp, und der würde dann durch eine Digitalanzeige angeben "Ausfahrt auf zwei Uhr"?
    #90VerfasserLady Grey (235863) 10 Sep. 12, 13:00
    Kommentar
    @87:
    Ist es echt so schwer, in so kleine Kreisel reinzufahren und, sobald man drin ist, den Blinker zu betätigen?
    #91VerfasserMandalor (856590) 10 Sep. 12, 13:08
    Kommentar
    Lady Grey, die Möglichkeiten bei solchen Fahrzeugen sind geradezu endlos. Man könnte fast alles anzeigen, sofern man Lust verspürt irgendetwas anzuzeigen. Man könnte in jede beliebige Himmelsrichtung zeigen, auch in solche, die gar noch nicht existieren. Man könnte mitteilen, dass man zwar eigentlich nach North-Cothelstone zu Lady Hesketh-Fortescue abbiegen wollte, aber sich dann aber umentschieden hat, und erst noch die Übernächste links zum Carrefour in die Käseabteilung fährt.

    Wir standen mal in einer Stadt in Japan an einer Kreuzung, als so ein Teil neben uns angehalten hat. Nach auffordernden Handzeichen von Frau Zirp hat der Fahrer stolz das gesamte Illuminationsprogramm seines Fahrzeugs abgespielt, samt Discomusik. Leider hab ich die HD mit den Fotos davon gerade nicht hier.
    #92Verfasserzirp_ (703877) 10 Sep. 12, 13:17
    Kommentar
    #91: Ich finde das nicht nur schwer, sondern auch ziemlich sinnlos. Was will man in dieser halben Sekunde mitteilen? Ich blinke schon 10 m vorher, da weiß der Hintermann Bescheid und der Gegenverkehr auch. Sollte ich mich dadurch strafbar machen? Bisher hat mich noch kein Schupo deswegen angehalten.
    #93VerfasserHarri Beau (812872) 10 Sep. 12, 13:38
    Kommentar
    @#91: Ja, das halte ich in der Tat für nahezu unmöglich. Und sinnlos wäre es außerdem, denn wenn irgendjemand bemerkt, dass ich blinke, bin ich schon längst wieder raus. Mir erschiene es jedenfalls weder natürlich noch sinnvoll, in der geschilderten Situation nicht ab ca. 30 oder 40 Meter vor dem Kreisel anzuzeigen, dass ich rechts abbiegen will, was ich ja, Kreisel oder nicht, de facto tue, sondern erst im allerletzten Moment den Blinker ein einziges Mal aufblitzen zu lassen.
    #94Verfasserdirk (236321) 10 Sep. 12, 13:39
    Kommentar
    Zirp, ich würde gerne eine graphische Darstellung des Schlipf anzeigen. Kriegst Du das hin? Danke.
    #95VerfasserLady Grey (235863) 10 Sep. 12, 13:43
    Kommentar
    In meiner Nachbarschaft gibt es auch noch die hübsche Lösung, dass an einem Kreisverkehr noch zusätzlich eine Ampel den Verkehr "regelt".
    Wenn der Kreisel "überlastet" ist, schaltet sie auf ROT :-)
    #96Verfasserwaltherwithh (554696) 10 Sep. 12, 13:54
    Kommentar
    Das läuft zwar eigentlich dem Sinn des Kreisels entgegen, muss aber wohl manchmal sein, wenn er zu klein gebaut wurde. Denn einen verstopften Kreisel wieder flott zu kriegen, ist noch viel schwieriger als eine verstopfte Kreuzung.
    #97Verfassertigger (236106) 10 Sep. 12, 14:05
    Kommentar
    In einer Eifel-Kleinstadt gab es mal einen Kreisverkehr, bei dem Rechts vor Links galt, wer hineinwollte, hatte Vorfahrt. Das musste allerdings bald geändert werden. Die Staus reichten oft bis auf die Autobahn.
    #98VerfasserEifelblume (341002) 10 Sep. 12, 14:26
    Kommentar
    @98: Das war bis vor ein paar Jahren die Standardregel. "Kreisverkehr" als spezielles verkehrsrechtliches Konstrukt gab es gar nicht, entweder die Vorfahrt war an jedem Einzelabzweig durch Schilder geregelt, oder es galt "rechts vor links". So habe ich das noch in der Fahrschule gelernt. Erst vor ungefähr 10 Jahren hat man die spezielle Kreisverkehrsregelung mitsamt dem zugehörigen Schild (wieder) eingeführt.
    #99Verfasserdirk (236321) 10 Sep. 12, 14:35
    Kommentar
    Ich glaube, mich zu erinnern, einmal gelesen zu haben, dass eigentlich in jedem Kreisverkehr Rechts vor Links gelten müsste und deswegen vor jeder Kreisverkehreinfahrt ein "Vorfahrt Achten"-Schild steht. Ich könnte aber gar nicht sicher sagen, ob das stimmt, obwohl ich täglich auf dem Weg zur Arbeit mehrere Kreisel unterschiedlicher Größe passiere. Und ich zähle zu der Fraktion, die Blinken beim Einfahren überflüssig finden (außer, es ist ein kleiner Kreisel und man möchte an der nächsten Ausfahrt direkt wieder heraus) und sich dafür über jeden ärgern, der beim Herausfahren den Blinker nicht betätigt.

    Stoppschilder in alle vier Richtungen fände ich dagegen befremdlich. Und Rechts vor Links funktioniert in der Regel prima, bei schwer einsehbaren Zufahrtsstraßen empfiehlt es sich halt, ein wenig zu bremsen, für den Fall, dass einer von rechts kommt ;o) In jedem Fall fließt der Verkehr besser, als wenn alle anhalten müssten.

    Edit: #99 war gerade noch nicht da. Hatte ich das also halb richtig in Erinnerung ;o))
    #100VerfasserDragon (238202) 10 Sep. 12, 14:36
    Kommentar
    Ich glaube, mich zu erinnern, einmal gelesen zu haben, dass eigentlich in jedem Kreisverkehr Rechts vor Links gelten müsste und deswegen vor jeder Kreisverkehreinfahrt ein "Vorfahrt Achten"-Schild steht.

    Genau so ist es ;). Zu Four-Way-Stop noch eine Anekdote: In meiner Heimatstadt wurde vor einigen Jahren mal ein solches eingeführt, für den Fall, dass die Ampel ausfällt. Es handelte sich um eine aus allen Richtungen vielbefahrene Kreuzung, so dass man auf diese Weise die Sicherheit erhöhen wollte. Allerdings mussten die Schilder wieder entfernt werden, weil die deutsche StVO ein Four-Way-Stop eben nicht vorsieht - kein Autofahrer muss, wenn er "Stop" sieht, damit rechnen, dass alle anderen auch "Stop" sehen. Die logische Konsequenz wäre eigentlich Rechts vor Links für alle gewesen, aber das wollte/durfte man auch nicht, so dass man letztendlich eine der beiden Straßen zur Vorfahrtstraße erklärt hat.
    #101VerfasserJanZ (805098) 10 Sep. 12, 14:48
    Kommentar
    Das Schild "Kreisverkehr" gibt es schon ziemlich lange, dito die entsprechende Regelung, eben nicht rechts vor links, sonst macht ein Kreisverkehr ja keinen Sinn (in der Eifel sah man das offensichtlich anders). Nur gab es kaum Kreisverkehre und auch die entsprechende Regel wurde im theoretischen Unterricht zwar vielleicht mal angesprochen aber schnell wieder vergessen (s. nochmals Eifel).
    #102Verfasserbluesky (236159) 10 Sep. 12, 14:55
    Kommentar
    Mit ein etwas Vorsicht zu genießen, da Erinnerungen aus dem Theorieunterricht, der zwar in diesem Jahrtausend stattfand, aber doch ein bichen her ist:

    Es gibt in D verschiedene Arten von Kreisverkehren. Der mit Abstand verbreitetste hat an den Einfahrten das Keisverkehrszeichen und Vorfahrt gewähren. Dann hat der Kreis Vorfahrt, es darf beim Einfahren nicht geblinkt werden, beim Rausfahren muß geblinkt werden. Es darf nur in der angegeben Richtung gefahren werden, Halten und Parken ist verboten.

    Ist nur das Kreisverkehrszeichen an den Einfahrten, ist alles wie oben aber der Keis hat keine Vorfahrt.

    Wenn es baulich ein Kreisverkehr ist, aber kein entsprechendes Schild angebracht ist, muß bei Einfahrt in den Kreisverkehr geblinkt werden.


    4-way-stops: In Wohngegenden mit gleich-kleinen-Straßen ähnlich sinnvoll wie unser rechts-vor-links bei solchen kleinen Straßen, mit jeweils ein paar Vor- und-Nachteilen (Anhalten müssen, auch wenn weit und breit Niemand kommt, in D oft schlecht einsehbare Sträßchen usw.). In Los Angeles habe ich es mal erlebt (zum Glück als Beifahrer), daß an einer riesigen Kreuzung mit zwei jeweils mehrspurigen Straßen die Ampel ausfiel. Da fuhr dann immer ein Schwung waagerecht, ein Schwung senkrecht, wieder einer waagerecht usw., ganz ohne Polizist oder sonstigen Regler. Das hätte in D zu einem heillosen Chaos geführt. Allerdings weniger wegen der Regelungen, sonder wegen der ich-hab-recht-Einstellung, die hier viele Verkehrsteilnehmer haben.


    Zu Ampel plus Schild: in D gibt es eine Rangordnung, welche Anweisung wann gilt:

    1. verkehrsregelnder Polizist, der toppt alles

    Keiner da? Dann

    2. Ampel

    Keine da oder außer Betrieb? Dann

    3. Verkehrsschild

    Keins da? Dann

    4. Rechts vor links
    #103VerfasserRussisch Brot (340782) 10 Sep. 12, 14:59
    Kommentar
    Nicht nur in der Eifel gab es Kreisverkehr mit Rechts-vor-Links-Regelung, in Bayreuth gab es auch mindestens ein so'n Teil (ich glaube sogar, dass es zwei Kreisverkehre in unmittelbarer Nachbarschaft waren, bin mir aber nicht mehr ganz sicher). Und dort hat man nicht eingesehen, dass es für den Verkehrsfluss wenig förderlich ist, wenn jeder, der in den Kreisverkehr reinfährt, Vorfahrt hat und der abfließende Verkehr warten musste, bis alle in den Kreisverkehr reingefahren sind, den Kreisverkehr verstopfen und es so keiner mehr bis zur Abfahrt schafft.
    Da gab es täglich im Berufsverkehr ein einziges Verkehrschaos.
    #104Verfasserspheniscus (301189) 10 Sep. 12, 15:46
    Kommentar
    Desgleichen in Königstein, einst der einzige Kreisverkehr in unserer Region und gefürchtet für seine Staus bei jeder Tag- und Nachtzeit.
    #105VerfasserRestitutus (765254) 10 Sep. 12, 16:04
    Kommentar
    #91: Ist es echt so schwer, in so kleine Kreisel reinzufahren und, sobald man drin ist, den Blinker zu betätigen?
    No, not difficult, but the time really is too short, because the roundabouts are too small!
    #84:Re #75: "Wer allerdings sofort wieder rechts raus will, kommt gar nicht zum blinken".
    That's exactly my problem with roundabouts in Germany: they are so small you really don't have time. The indicator blinks once and then you are at your exit (in the case of first exit), so you can't be sure if the driver waiting to enter the roundabout has really seen that you are exiting, and that he doesn't have to wait for you. If you can se,e before the other car even enters the roundabout, that it will be taking the first exit, you can proceed and everything flows much faster, with less waiting time.
    Indicating while already entering the roundabout is also more important in roundabouts with more than one lane. If someone enters in the middle (inner) lane (in UK, the right-hand lane) and is going to the third exit, then the traffic waiting to enter and use the outer lane for the first and second exits can do so without waiting.

    The roundabouts in Germany are usually quite small. One of the principles is: the more traffic, the larger the roundabout has to be in order to keep traffic flowing smoothly. At the large roundabouts in the UK, you often don't need to stop and can enter in 2nd or 3rd gear. Also all roads leading into a roundabout should have roughly similar volumes of traffic, as otherwise one road will dominate and drivers from the others will find it harder to enter the roundabout.
    #106VerfasserJaymack (805011) 10 Sep. 12, 17:18
    Kommentar
    @98-105:

    Ein Kreisverkehr im Sinne der Straßenverkehrsordnung (StVO) muss an jeder Zufahrt durch eine blaue Ronde mit drei sich verfolgenden weißen Pfeilen (Zeichen 215) sowie einem "Vorfahrt gewähren" - Schild (Zeichen 205) gekennzeichnet werden. Ansonsten handelt es sich um eine normale Kreuzung und es gilt die Rechts-vor-Links-Regel (s. aber dazu unten unter Nr. 3!!).

    Der Kreisverkehr ist mit Verordnung vom 11.12.2000 in die StVO (wieder) eingeführt worden.

    § 8 Abs. 1a StVO regelt:
    „Ist an der Einmündung in einen Kreisverkehr Zeichen 215 (Kreisverkehr) unter dem Zeichen 205 (Vorfahrt gewähren) angeordnet, hat der Verkehr auf der Kreisfahrbahn Vorfahrt. Bei der Einfahrt in einen solchen Kreisverkehr ist die Benutzung des Fahrtrichtungsanzeigers unzulässig.“

    Also nur wenn beide Zeichen vorhanden sind, hat der Verkehr im Kreisel Vorfahrt, ansonsten handelt es sich um eine normale Kreuzung und es gilt (eigentlich, s. unten nr. 3) die Rechts-vor-Links-Regel.

    Grundsätzlich sind also vier grundverschiedene Arten von Kreisverkehren zu unterscheiden:

    1.Der »richtige« Kreisverkehr mit dem Vorfahrt-gewähren-Schild und dem Kreisverkehrszeichen. Hier haben Fahrzeuge im Kreisel tatsächlich immer die Vorfahrt, seit Februar 2001 steht es so in der Straßenverkehrs-Ordnung (§ 8 Abs. 1a StVO). Dies ist die einzig korrekte —und glücklicherweise auch die übliche— Art und Weise, einen Kreisverkehr auszuschildern. Fahrzeuge, die in den Kreis einfahren wollen, müssen die Vorfahrt der im Kreis befindlichen Fahrzeuge beachten. Im Kreis selbst werden dann keine weiteren Vorfahrt gebenden Schilder mehr aufgestellt.

    2.Der »halbherzige« Kreisverkehr mit einer Mittelinsel, vor dem kein Kreisverkehr-Schild aufgestellt ist, sondern nur ein Vorfahrt-gewähren-Schild. Es gab sie insbesondere vor dem Jahr 2001. Sie sollten eigentlich mittlerweile mit einem Kreisverkehrsschild nachgerüstet sein, aber die Vorfahrtregel ist wenigstens eindeutig: Wer hinein will, muss nötigenfalls warten.

    3.Und umgekehrt: falsch ausgeschilderte Kreisverkehre, an denen nur das blaue Kreisverkehr-Zeichen angebracht ist, aber kein Vorfahrt-gewähren-Schild. Das Kreisverkehrsschild alleine sagt zwar — gemäß Anlage 2 der Straßenverkehrsordnung zu Zeichen 215 — nichts über die Vorfahrtlage aus, nach Meinung von Verehrsexperten müssen die einfahrenden Fahrzeuge hierbei jedoch aufgrund des Sicherheitsgedankens und der Ähnlichkeit zur korrekten Beschilderung ebenfalls warten (dem Kreisverkehrsschild wird also die eigentlich fehlende Vorfahrtbedeutung zugeordnet).

    4.Kleine Rondelle mit ebenso kleinen Mittelaufbauten, an denen weder Zeichen 205 noch Zeichen 215 steht. Man findet sie hauptsächlich in sehr verkehrsarmen Straßen in Wohngebieten; sie dienen der Verkehrsberuhigung. Da überhaupt kein Verkehrszeichen die Vorfahrt regelt, gilt dort rechts vor links. Streng genommen sollte man in diesem Fall auch nicht »Kreisverkehr« sagen. Es sind im Grunde »ganz kleine Kreuzungen mit einer Insel in der Mitte«.
    #107Verfasserneutrino (17998) 10 Sep. 12, 18:02
    Kommentar
    Camberwell Junction is a major six-way intersection in Melbourne, where traffic lights were only installed in the 1970s. I still think that took all the fun out of it. Even before the introduction of "give way to the right" for unmarked intersections, it used to work very well: everyone just used to carefully nose their way in, in a haphazard but orderly way. I can't remember any accidents there. So that was perhaps our equivalent of an all-way stop – although I've never heard the expression, and pre-70s Camberwell Junction is the only example I can think of.

    Weird setups where intersections with traffic lights are also fitted with stop, yield and priority road signs. ... Why do these signs even exist? 

    You don't even notice the stop and give-way signs when the traffic lights are in operation.

    I do wish that Germans could place their traffic lights so that the first person in the queue could see them without cricking his neck.

    I agree entirely!
    #108VerfasserStravinsky (637051) 10 Sep. 12, 18:19
    Kommentar
    I do wish that Germans could place their traffic lights so that the first person in the queue could see them without cricking his neck.


    Und ich wünschte, Amerikaner würden ihre Ampeln da anbringen, wo man halten muß und nicht etliche Meter weiter hinten ;-). Kommt halt drauf an, was man gewohnt ist.
    #109VerfasserRussisch Brot (340782) 10 Sep. 12, 18:24
    Kommentar
    @ 106 Jaymack
    The roundabouts in Germany are usually quite small.
    Dann bist Du wohl noch nie in Hannover und Umland gewesen. Da gibt es große und kleine Kreisel, mit 3 oder 4 oder 5 Ausfahrten, Ampelgesteuert oder nur mit Verkehrszeichen. Bei manchen musst Du dann die richtige Spur erwischen, damit du überhaupt raus darfst.
    #110Verfasserrennmotte (617913) 10 Sep. 12, 18:46
    Kommentar
    Und ich wünschte, Amerikaner würden ihre Ampeln da anbringen, wo man halten muß und nicht etliche Meter weiter hinten ;-). 

    I've always been somewhat confused about vor and hinter in the context of coming to a stop in a car. If you stop before you reach the line, it's "vor der Linie". But if there's another car already stopped there, you're "hinter dem Manta". So you're both vor and hinter things in front of you. (I know this is OT – perhaps someone can direct me to an existing thread!)
    #111VerfasserStravinsky (637051) 10 Sep. 12, 18:47
    Kommentar
    Und ich wünschte, Amerikaner würden ihre Ampeln da anbringen, wo man halten muß und nicht etliche Meter weiter hinten ;-).
    Und ich wünschte, die Ampeln in den USA würden nicht direkt von rot auf grün wechseln. Wie soll ich denn so wissen, wann ich den Gang einlegen soll um dann gleich zu starten? ;-)
    #112Verfasserrennmotte (617913) 10 Sep. 12, 18:50
    Kommentar
    Und ich wünschte, Amerikaner würden ihre Verkehrsschilder für Highwayauffahrten so hoch anbringen, dass sie nicht schon von vor ihnen haltenden/fahrenden SUVs verdeckt werden, und so groß gestalten, dass man sie rechtzeitig genug sieht, um den Spurwechsel noch zu schaffen.
    Ich meine diese Dinger
    http://www.mesalek.com/colo/picts/us160-25-23...
    http://www.mesalek.com/colo/picts/co88blvw-i25.jpg
    http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1361/130320527...
    (allerdings habe ich sie oft noch tiefer gesehen, wie hier: http://www.aaroads.com/california/images073/c... ) und halte das für ähnlich blöd wie die Ampeln zum Halsverrecken bei uns. Daran kann man sich nicht gewöhnen, da hilft nur ein Navi.
    #113VerfasserMattes (236368) 10 Sep. 12, 18:54
    Kommentar
    Aber bitte: "... die Ampeln zum Halsverrenken" ! - ;-))
    #114VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 10 Sep. 12, 18:58
    Kommentar
    @114: Mir will ums Verrecken nicht einfallen, was du meinst ;-)

    Noch ein Kommentar zur ursprünglichen Diskussion: Dass Kreuzungen mit vier Stoppschildern den Durchgangsverkehr verlangsamen, ist ziemlich klar. Aber das wurde bisher nur als Nachteil genannt. Ich habe das in den USA als Vorteil erlebt. In Wohngebieten braucht man keine Ruckelschwellen oder Ähnliches. Der Verkehrsfluss wird allein durch die Kreuzungen angenehm verlangsamt und läuft stressfreier.
    #115VerfasserMattes (236368) 10 Sep. 12, 19:00
    Kommentar
    >>da hilft nur ein Navi

    No, there's where you need a navigator: an eagle-eyed person sitting in the passenger seat and peering a couple of blocks ahead for the first glimpse of a blue interstate sign. (-:

    What's even more charming is when the signs lead you around several blocks in various directions saying not 'I-25' but 'To I-25,' and then if you miss one of them, you have to retrace your path and sort of pick up the scent again.

    But you get used to it. If it's any consolation, poor signage is frustrating to Americans from out of town too. There are several freeway intersections in large cities in my state where you really just have to know where you're going, because if you relied on the signs, you'd be out of luck.

    And GPS can be anything but helpful. On a recent trip my parents relied on GPS in another city and it sent them across the wrong freeway to a totally different part of town. Just this morning my mom was meeting an out-of-town guest for lunch and the guest's GPS sent her somewhere 3 miles in the opposite direction from the restaurant. Electronics are well and good when they work, but there's still no substitute for good old-fashioned maps.

    >>die richtige Spur erwischen, damit du überhaupt raus darfst

    That's what turns me off traffic circles, period. I remember some of the ones in the UK as pretty alarming, and I wasn't even driving. It really did seem entirely possible to be just stranded on the edge indefinitely, waiting in vain for a break in the traffic when someone might let you in, and then if you ever got in, waiting in vain for the opportunity to change lanes to try to get over to the place you needed to get out. Maybe all the locals already know which lane to get in for what, but if you get in the wrong one, changing can be like taking your life in your hands, especially if you're not used to a right-hand-drive car in the first place and you have to think harder about your blind spots. We really did wonder a couple of times if we were doomed to keep going around and around and around until the traffic finally thinned out at bedtime.

    >>At the large roundabouts in the UK, you often don't need to stop and can enter in 2nd or 3rd gear.

    That's exactly the problem, if everyone else is zipping along at a brisk pace and you need to go slow enough to try to figure out which of maybe 5 or 6 choices is exit you're looking for, and get into the lane for it.
    #116Verfasserhm -- us (236141) 10 Sep. 12, 19:33
    Kommentar
    No, there's where you need a navigator:

    Ich war der Navigator, und bin verzweifelt. Keine Adleraugen, zugegeben, aber eigentlich nicht schlecht im Navigieren. Danke für den Trost, dass Amerikaner oft genauso an den Schildern verzweifeln, hm -- us. Das Gute ist, dass hektische kurzfristige Spurwechsel wegen des langsameren Verkehrs zwar für einen selbst stressig sind, aber von den anderen Verkehrsteilnehmern (außerhalb der kalifornischen innnerstädtischen Freeways) meistens deutlich weniger aggressiv aufgenommen werden als hier in D.
    #117VerfasserMattes (236368) 10 Sep. 12, 19:41
    Kommentar
    Und ich wünschte, Amerikaner würden ihre Ampeln da anbringen, wo man halten muß und nicht etliche Meter weiter hinten ;-). Kommt halt drauf an, was man gewohnt ist.
    Das verstehe ich jetzt gar nicht. Wann noch nie dort, sorry. Man hält hinter der Ampel? Und beobachtet die dann aus dem Rückspiegel? Oder muss nach der Ampel nochmal anhalten und sich vergewissern?
    #118VerfasserIrene (236484) 10 Sep. 12, 19:46
    Kommentar
    #118: Da haben wir es wieder mit "hinter" und "vor" (vgl. #111). Die Ampeln sind oft (immer?) an der gegenüberliegenden Straßenseite angebracht, also hinter der Kreuzung. Wer gewohnt ist, direkt vor der Ampel zu halten, läuft Gefahr, mitten in die Kreuzung reinzufahren.
    #119VerfasserMattes (236368) 10 Sep. 12, 19:53
    Kommentar
    Nein , eher wie in Frankreich: Da stehen die Ampeln gerne auf der fernen Seite der Kreuzung.
    #120VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 10 Sep. 12, 19:54
    Kommentar
    @110
    That's true – at least I have never driven in that area. Some of the roundabouts at the motorway exits I was thinking of are 100 or 200 metres in diameter or more, not just 10 or 20 like most of the ones around where I live (SW Germany). Maybe they are trying to save space or not use up too much land.
    And I've also experienced the ones in UK where, at least in rush hour traffic, there are traffic lights as well.
    Before some roundabouts I drove through recently in the UK, there was an arrow painted on the road to show you which lane you needed to be for each exit. This seemed to be mostly at very busy roundabouts, presumably to avoid too much lane changing.
    #121VerfasserJaymack (805011) 10 Sep. 12, 19:59
    Kommentar
    Danke, Mattes!
    In Frankreich? Wirklich? *Grübel* Kann mich nicht erinnern, da jemals Probleme mit Ampeln gehabt zu haben. Ist eines unserer liebsten Urlaubsländer. *grübel* Ich halte halt da, wo die Kreuzung beginnt.



    #122VerfasserIrene (236484) 10 Sep. 12, 20:00
    Kommentar
    Isn't one of the reasons for putting the traffic light on the far corner so that it can also be the 'Walk' and 'Don't Walk' light for the pedestrians? I picture pedestrians having to crane their necks, or stand far back from the curb, if it were on the near corner.

    Now that you mention it, though, I thought modern traffic lights were generally suspended on wires or horizontal poles over the the intersection. Though without looking at one, I'm not sure if it's the far side, the near side, or out in the the middle. In any case, out in the middle somewhere is helpful; I find the older-style traffic lights at the side of the street a little harder to pay attention to, though many downtown streets still have them.

    One other belated thought: in AE the verb for what you're supposed to do before changing lanes is (to) signal, that is, to use a turn signal.


    >>In Wohngebieten braucht man keine Ruckelschwellen

    (Ruckeln, hmm, new word ...) If you mean speed bumps, actually we have those too, on a few busier streets leading into and out of residential neighborhoods, or ones that people are tempted to use as cut-throughs during heavy rush-hour traffic. But I agree that stop signs make things less hectic, because they give everyone the same chance to go without having to worry about anyone else.
    #123Verfasserhm -- us (236141) 10 Sep. 12, 20:21
    Kommentar
    Man hält hinter der Ampel? Und beobachtet die dann aus dem Rückspiegel? (#118)

    Nein, der Spiegel dient doch dazu, Sachen hinter sich zu erkennen – also wenn die Ampel hinter einem liegt und nicht umgekehrt, wenn man hinter der Ampel steht.

    Da haben wir es wieder mit "hinter" und "vor" (vgl. #111).
    (#119)

    Indeed! Jetzt ist die Verwirrung perfekt.
    #124VerfasserStravinsky (637051) 10 Sep. 12, 20:25
    Kommentar
    Und ich wünschte, Amerikaner würden ihre Ampeln da anbringen, wo man halten muß und nicht etliche Meter weiter hinten ;-).

    Es hat schon seinen Sinn. So, wie AVIS die Bremsen seiner Mietwagen einstellt, kommst du nämlich auch beim vollen Durchtreten erst unter der Ampel zum Stehen. Und sonst würdest du ja nicht mehr sehen, wann es Grün wird!

    Before some roundabouts I drove through recently in the UK, there was an arrow painted on the road to show you which lane you needed to be for each exit. This seemed to be mostly at very busy roundabouts, presumably to avoid too much lane changing.


    Das gibt es in Slowenien auch. Und da verraten sie dir erst 90 Grad vorher, dass deine Spur ab sofort dorthin abbiegen wird, wohin du gar nicht willst - so viel zum Thema "lane changing". Noch toller finde ich einen oft durchfahrenen Kreisel dort, der gleich zweispurig abbiegt, nur, um sich 50 Meter weiter auf eine Spur zu verengen ...
    #125VerfasserRestitutus (765254) 10 Sep. 12, 23:48
    Kommentar
    Wer gewohnt ist, direkt vor der Ampel zu halten, läuft Gefahr, mitten in die Kreuzung reinzufahren.

    Und Leute, die gewohnt sind, ihrem Navi zu vertrauen, fahren auf eine Fähre, weil ihr Navi das so sagt. Es muß natürlich nicht darauf geachtet werden, ob die Fähre überhaupt da ist...
    #126VerfasserMandalor (856590) 11 Sep. 12, 06:40
    Kommentar
    I do wish that Germans could place their traffic lights so that the first person in the queue could see them without cricking his neck.

    Es ist nun mal ehernes Gesetz in Deutschland: Eine rote Ampel darf nicht überfahren werden. Niemals. Unter keinen Umständen.

    Würde man die Ampel hinter der Kreuzung anbringen, dann müssten (und würden) alle diejenigen, die sich schon auf der Kreuzung befinden, weil sie z. B. als Abbieger bei Grün eingefahren sind, mitten auf der Kreuzung vor der roten Ampel anhalten. Genauso habe ich reagiert, als ich das erste Mal (ich glaube in Dänemark) mit solchen Hinterkreuzungsampeln in Kontakt geraten bin. Man muss sein auf "Rot=Halt" konditioniertes Hirn schon gezielt umprogrammieren, um damit klarzukommen. Und das würde den Respekt vor roten Ampeln womöglich allgemein verringern.
    #127Verfasserdirk (236321) 11 Sep. 12, 08:25
    Kommentar
    An welcher Stelle wird bei solchen Ampeln eigentlich der Starenkasten angebracht?
    #128VerfasserRestitutus (765254) 11 Sep. 12, 09:44
    Kommentar
    Stimmt, bei uns sind die Ampeln meist entweder bei der Haltelinie oder in der Mitte der Kreuzung (an Seilen aufgehängt). Manchmal gibt's eine kleine Zusatzampel in Augenhöhe für den vordersten Fahrer.

    Manchmal gibt's aber auch das "amerikanische" System mit der Ampel am gegenüberliegenden Ende der Kreuzung. Das würde ich mir öfter wünschen. Bei unseren Fußgängerampeln funktioniert das ja auch problemlos!
    #129VerfasserChris (AT) (237739) 11 Sep. 12, 09:53
    Kommentar
    Es ist nun mal ehernes Gesetz in Deutschland: Eine rote Ampel darf nicht überfahren werden. Niemals. Unter keinen Umständen.

    Ist so nicht ganz richtig. Der Haltebalken darf nicht überfahren werden. Deshalb darf man ja auch den Kreuzungsbereich noch verlassen, auch wenn die Ampel schon Rot zeigt. Wenn ich schon auf der Kreuzung stehe, sehe ich die Ampel ja auch nicht mehr, also mache ich mich in dem Moment nicht wirklich strafbar.
    #130VerfasserMandalor (856590) 11 Sep. 12, 11:26
    Kommentar
    Man vergleiche zu diesem Thema auch die #103 sowie meine #88. - ;-)

    Außerdem gibt es da noch den "übergesetzlichen Notstand" !
    #131VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 11 Sep. 12, 11:41
    Kommentar
    OT:

    reminds me of how I started screeeaaaaming when my british boyfriend indicated left before passing a roundabound in germany.
    he turned right though. =)
    I've just never heard of the english way before.
    #132Verfasserbumblebee_1_3 (857840) 11 Sep. 12, 11:47
    Kommentar
    Das erinnert mich wiederum an meine Fahrprüfung, als mir der Prüfer sagte, ich sollte die "dritte Ausfahrt" im Kreisverkehr nehmen, worauf ich sagte "Also links". Seine irritierte Reaktion erklärte er nachher damit, dass er glaubte, ich wolle tatsächlich links herum durch den Kreisverkehr fahren :).
    #133VerfasserJanZ (805098) 11 Sep. 12, 12:26
    Kommentar
    @130: Die Wartelinie zu überfahren ist eine Sache, die rote Ampel tatsächlich zu passieren aber eine ganz andere. Man darf nicht meinen, wenn man die über die Wartelinie einmal weg ist, brauche die Ampel einen nicht mehr zu interessieren. Solange man das Rotlicht sehen kann, muss man es auch beachten. Es könnte ja sein, dass man die Linie, die sich aus irgendeinem Grund ein paar Meter vor der Ampel befindet, bei Grün überquert hat, aber dann plötzlich bremsen muss, weil z.B. ein Hund auf die Straße läuft. Wenn die Ampel inzwischen Rot zeigt, muss man dort auch warten. Anders, wenn man die Ampel selbst schon hinter sich gelassen hat und mitten auf der Kreuzung anhalten muss. Dann darf man weiterfahren, sobald das gefahrlos möglich ist. Wenn man vorher schon absehen kann, dass man auf der Kreuzung anhalten müsste, darf man - auch bei Grün - natürlich gar nicht erst einfahren.
    #134Verfasserdirk (236321) 11 Sep. 12, 12:45
    Kommentar
    @dirk:
    Habe ich was anderes geschrieben?

    Wenn ich schon auf der Kreuzung stehe, sehe ich die Ampel ja auch nicht mehr,
    #135VerfasserMandalor (856590) 11 Sep. 12, 13:02
    Kommentar
    Die Wartelinie zu überfahren ist eine Sache, die rote Ampel tatsächlich zu passieren aber eine ganz andere.

    Das sehe ich, jdf aus österreichischer Sich (vielleicht bestehen hier ja Unterschiede) nicht so: wenn die Haltelinie einmal (so heißt sie hierzulande) passiert ist, darf man die Kreuzung auch wieder verlassen.

    Man darf nicht meinen, wenn man die über die Wartelinie einmal weg ist, brauche die Ampel einen nicht mehr zu interessieren.

    Doch, ziemlich genau das.

    Es könnte ja sein, dass man die Linie, die sich aus irgendeinem Grund ein paar Meter vor der Ampel befindet, bei Grün überquert hat, aber dann plötzlich bremsen muss, weil z.B. ein Hund auf die Straße läuft.

    Sicher, aber das ändert nichts daran, dass man die Kreuzung zulässigerweise während der Grünphase befahren hat, und folglich auch noch durchfahren darf.

    § 38 Abs. 5 öStVO: Rotes Licht gilt als Zeichen für “Halt”. Bei diesem Zeichen haben die Lenker von Fahrzeugen ... an den im Abs. 1 bezeichneten Stellen (Anm.: d.h., wenn vorhanden, vor der Haltelinie) anzuhalten.
    #136VerfasserCarullus (670120) 11 Sep. 12, 13:12
    Kommentar
    @Dirk: das mit dem auch bei Grün nicht in eine Kreuzung einzufahren, wenn abzusehen ist, daß ich irgendwo auf der Kreuzung aufgrund von Rückstau hängenbleibe, scheint aber auch eine relativ deutsche Spezialität zu sein. Zumindest Franzosen haben immer mit völligem Unverständnis reagiert, wenn ich an einer grünen Ampel stehenblieb, weil mir klar war, daß sich der Rückstau nicht bis zur Grünphase des Querverkehrs auflösen würde.

    Und wo wird anderswo traditionell die Rettungsgasse gebildet?
    #137VerfasserChaja (236098) 11 Sep. 12, 13:16
    Kommentar
    @Carullus: genau so kenne ich das auch.

    @Chaja: das gilt auch für Österreich. Man darf nur dann in die Kreuzung einfahren, wenn man sie vor "Rot" wieder verlassen kann.

    Und wo wird anderswo traditionell die Rettungsgasse gebildet?

    In Tschechien, der Schweiz und Slowenien und seit Jahresanfang 2012 auch in Österreich.
    #138VerfasserChris (AT) (237739) 11 Sep. 12, 13:20
    Kommentar
    #137: Dafür gibt es in den USA ein eigenes Verkehrsschild (so wie die Vielfalt an Verkehrsschildern dort überhaupt grenzenlos scheint): schwarz auf weiß "Do not block intersection".
    #139VerfasserMattes (236368) 11 Sep. 12, 13:28
    Kommentar
    Beziehungsweise, wie es so schön auf den Hinweisschildern heißt: "Hier gilt die Rettungsgasse". Abgesehen von einer noch zu führenden Diskussion mit mindestens 180 Postings, ob eine Gasse gelten kann, bin ich sicher, dass für die p.t. LEOniden der Unterschied zwischen bilden und gelten offensichtlich ist.
    #140Verfassertigger (236106) 11 Sep. 12, 13:38
    Kommentar
    wenn ich an einer grünen Ampel stehenblieb, weil mir klar war, daß sich der Rückstau nicht bis zur Grünphase des Querverkehrs auflösen würde.

    Unfortunely you are a rarity in Germany in my experience, Chaja;

    I've been hoping for years that one day yellow boxes will appear on German streets...

    "Box junctions. These have criss-cross yellow lines painted on the road (see 'Road markings'). You MUST NOT enter the box until your exit road or lane is clear."
    There's a picture in http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/TravelAndTranspor...
    #141Verfassermikefm (760309) 11 Sep. 12, 13:39
    Kommentar
    @Carullus, Chris:
    Da gibt es offenbar einen echten Unterschied zwischen der deutschen und der österreichischen Regelung. In Deutschland steht die Ampel immer dort, wo der durch sie geschützte Bereich beginnt. Die Haltelinie kann dagegen irgendwo sein, z.B. vor einer Einmündung, die von wartenden Fahrzeugen frei gehalten werden soll, aber selbst nicht zum geschützten Bereich gehört. Ein bloßes Überfahren der Haltelinie bei Rot gilt m. W. nur als Ordnungswidrigkeit, aber nicht als Rotlichtverstoß. Weil die Ampel den Beginn des geschützten Bereichs definiert, kann sie niemals in der Mitte oder gar hinter der Kreuzung stehen.

    Es gibt immer wieder heiße Diskussionen um die Frage, ob man die Haltelinie trotz Rotlicht überfahren darf, wenn man noch vor der Ampel abbiegen will. Meiner Ansicht nach darf man das, denn die Ampel (und somit auch die zugehörige Haltelinie) hat keine Relevanz für Verkehrsteilnehmer, die den durch sie geschützten Bereich gar nicht befahren.
    #142Verfasserdirk (236321) 11 Sep. 12, 13:46
    Kommentar
    Gibt es in solchen Fällen nicht immer zwei Haltelinien: Eine verbindliche direkt an der Ampel und eine mit einem Schild "Bei Rot hier halten", die aber notfalls überfahren werden kann?
    #143VerfasserJanZ (805098) 11 Sep. 12, 13:49
    Kommentar
    Einen Tipp habe ich für den OP: Fahre niemals mit dem Auto nach Paris und erst recht nicht nach Rom oder Neapel...
    #144VerfasserEifelblume (341002) 11 Sep. 12, 13:57
    Kommentar
    @dirk: die typische, an Seilen über dem Kreuzungsmittelpunkt aufgehängte Ampel gibt es also in DE nicht?

    http://www.auto-motor.at/auto-fotos/Auto-Serv...
    #145VerfasserChris (AT) (237739) 11 Sep. 12, 14:45
    Kommentar
    Mir wäre diese Ampelform in Deutschland, Niederlanden und USA überhaupt nicht geläufig. Vielleicht spezielles AT-Modell? Also Österreich? Rundum-Ampel?

    In USA hängen allerdings manchmal Ampeln schon an "Strippen" und da fallen sie dann bei Sturm herunter... Allerdings hängen da dann meistens jeweils Ampeln für eine Fahrspur.
    #146Verfasserwaltherwithh (554696) 11 Sep. 12, 14:58
    Kommentar
    Chris, so eine Ampel habe ich noch nie gesehen.

    Wie seht ihr in De folgende Situation:
    Wenige Meter hinter einer Kreuzung ist ein Fußgängerüberweg mit Ampel. Vor der Kreuzung ist eine Haltelinie mit einem Schild "Bei Rot hier halten".
    Darf man bei Rot an dieser Kreuzung abbiegen, da die Ampel ja erst hinter der Kreuzung ist? Oder gilt das Halteschild und die Haltlinie trotzdem?
    #147VerfasserDodolina (379349) 11 Sep. 12, 14:59
    Kommentar
    Gute Frage in #147. Ich glaube, man muss halten, könnte nämlich sein, dass um die Ecke noch eine Fußgängerampel schlecht sichtbar ist, die zur gleichen Zeit für Fußgänger GRÜN anzeigt...
    Ich kenne hier in der Umgebung Stellen, wo vor einer "Lichtsignalanlage" zwei Haltelinien aufgemalt sind, normalerweise muss man da auch an der ersten halten, um Verkehr aus einem Seitensträßchen entweder das Einfädeln oder das Kreuzen zu ermöglichen.
    #148Verfasserwaltherwithh (554696) 11 Sep. 12, 15:06
    Kommentar
    @Chris: Nee. In Deutschland nie gesehen und würde mich auch seeehr wundern!

    @Dodolina: siehe #142, 2. Absatz. Oder habe ich die Frage falsch verstanden?

    Edit @#148: Dann würde die Ampel mit Sicherheit vor der Abbiegung stehen!
    #149Verfasserdirk (236321) 11 Sep. 12, 15:06
    Kommentar
    @142, 143, 147 & 149:
    Es gibt in Deutschland Haltelinien (durchgehender weißer* Balken über die gesamte Breite des Fahrstreifens) und Aufstell- oder Wartelinien (unterbrochener => gestrichelter weißer* Balken über die gesamte Breite des Fahrsteifens).
    Haltelinien befinden sich in geringem Abstand vor der zugehörigen Lichtsignalanlage (= Ampel) und dürfen bei "Rot" nicht überfahren werden. Sollen vor der Lichtsignalanlage gelegene Einmündungen, Ausfahrten etc. nicht durch wartende Fahrzeuge des LSA-geregelten Verkehrsstroms blockiert werden, können zusätzliche Aufstelllinien markiert werden, die die Fahrzeugführer dazu anhalten, vor dieser Linie anzuhalten (SCNR). Dies stellt jedoch keine Verpflichtung dar, sondern eine freundliche Aufforderung.
    Die sicherheitsrelevante Berechnung der Signalzeiten richtet sich stets nach der Haltelinie.
    So ist das in der Theorie, aber offenbar haben viele Strassenverkehrsbehörden da einen eher nachlässigen oder kreativen Ansatz und infolge dessen individuelle Lösungen entwickelt. Viele einschläige Richtlinien wurden auch mittlerweile in "Empfehlungen" umbenannt, und ich kann mich erinnern, in den 90er Jahren in Dresden serienweise eigentlich unzulässige Kombinationen von Fahrbahnmarkierungen, Strassenschildern und Lichtzeichenanlagen gesehen zu haben.

    *bei zeitweiligen Fahrbahnmarkierungen gelb
    #150VerfasserNico (DE) (769488) 11 Sep. 12, 15:26
    Kommentar
    Wenige Meter hinter einer Kreuzung ist ein Fußgängerüberweg mit Ampel. Vor der Kreuzung ist eine Haltelinie mit einem Schild "Bei Rot hier halten".
    Darf man bei Rot an dieser Kreuzung abbiegen,
     

    Ja

    da die Ampel ja erst hinter der Kreuzung ist? Oder gilt das Halteschild und die Haltlinie trotzdem?

    Auch ja, für die geradeaus Fahrenden.

    Edit sieht gerade Postinmg 180 und spart sich den Rest.
    #151VerfasserFeuerflieger_GMX (252429) 11 Sep. 12, 15:36
    Kommentar
    Wie seht ihr in De folgende Situation:
    Wenige Meter hinter einer Kreuzung ist ein Fußgängerüberweg mit Ampel. Vor der Kreuzung ist eine Haltelinie mit einem Schild "Bei Rot hier halten".
    Darf man bei Rot an dieser Kreuzung abbiegen, da die Ampel ja erst hinter der Kreuzung ist? Oder gilt das Halteschild und die Haltlinie trotzdem?


    Ein Schild vor einer Ampel "Bei Rot hier halten!" ist kein Gebotszeichen (Ha VRS 49 220). Auch wenn die Aufforderung durch ein ZZ. 1012-35, also ein Verkehrszeichen, erfolgt, ist die Nichtbeachtung nicht bußgeldbewehrt (LG Berlin, ZfS 01 8). Daraus kann abgeleitet werden, dass der Raum zwischen dem Schild und der Haltlinie der LZA bzw. der LZA nicht zu dem durch das Rotlicht geschützten Bereich gehört. Damit liegt kein Rotlichtverstoß vor, wenn in diesem Bereich vor der Lichtzeichenanlage abgebogen wird.
    #152VerfasserMandalor (856590) 11 Sep. 12, 15:42
    Kommentar
    Haltelinien befinden sich in geringem Abstand vor der zugehörigen Lichtsignalanlage (= Ampel) und dürfen bei "Rot" nicht überfahren werden. 

    Klar, aber trotzdem ist es ein Unterschied in der Schwere des Vergehens (und in der Höhe der Strafe), ob man bei Rot "nur" die Haltelinie überfährt oder tatsächlich an der Ampel vorbeifährt. Und es gibt tatsächlich Stellen (ich kenne mindestens eine), wo die Haltelinie (durchgezogener Balken) ein ganzes Stück vor der Ampel aufgepinselt ist und durch das Schild "Bei Rot hier halten" ergänzt wird. Ob das so sein sollte, ist eine andere Frage, aber es kommt vor. Und da ist meine Ansicht, dass ich, wenn ich vor der Ampel rechts abbiege, weder Ampel noch Haltelinie noch Schild beachten muss, weil die Ampel zum Schutz eines Bereichs (des Fußgängerüberwegs) dient, den ich gar nicht befahre, und somit für mich nicht relevant ist.
    #153Verfasserdirk (236321) 11 Sep. 12, 15:48
    Kommentar
    wo die Haltelinie (durchgezogener Balken) ein ganzes Stück vor der Ampel aufgepinselt ist und durch das Schild "Bei Rot hier halten" ergänzt wird.

    Also so that cyclists can safely leave a park e.g.and get into position immediately in front of the traffic lights.
    #154Verfassermikefm (760309) 11 Sep. 12, 16:02
    Kommentar
    Also, hierherum sind die meisten "bei Rot hier halten"-Schilder vor der Polizei- und der Feuerwache angebracht. Da ich meine blecherne Knutschkugel liebe und davon ausgehe, dass ein ausrückendes Löschfahrzeug mehr Masse aufbringt, halte ich dann auch brav an... ;-).
    #155VerfasserGuggstDu (427193) 11 Sep. 12, 16:03
    Kommentar
    @153:
    Das ist genau das Problem bei den "individuellen" Lösungen - sie sind sehr anfällig für Fehlinterpretationen. Meiner Meinung nach kann ein einfaches Schild mit irgendeinem Geschreibsel drauf (Bei Rot hier anhalten) keine verbindliche Wirkung entfalten, sondern nur die dort auch angeordnete Haltelinie. Wo eine solche fehlt, ist - meiner Meinung nach - das weiterfahren zulässig. Ob das der danebenstehende Polizist und im Weiteren der Verkehrsrichter aber genau so sehen, ist schwer vorherzusagen. Falls da jedoch eine Haltelinie ist, muß man da bei "Rot" auch anhalten. Dann kann man höchstens seinerseits versuchen, vor Gericht nachzuweisen daß die Zuordnung der Ampel zu dieser Haltelinie wegen der großen Entfernung nicht erkennbar ist bzw. der Abstand zwischen Haltelinie und Ampel so groß, daß man bei der zulässigen Höchstgeschwindigkeit nicht mehr vor der Haltelinie anhalten kann. Das dürfte aber praktisch nie der Fall sein.
    Da jedoch die Haltelinie zur Ampel gehört, darf sie auch nicht überquert werden, wenn die Ampel "Rot" zeigt. Die Einsicht in die Notwendigkeit einzelner Vorschriften erhöht zwar deren Akzeptanz, ist aber leider ohne Bedeutung für deren Verbindlichkeit ;-)
    #156VerfasserNico (DE) (769488) 11 Sep. 12, 16:16
    Kommentar
    Da jedoch die Haltelinie zur Ampel gehört, darf sie auch nicht überquert werden, wenn die Ampel "Rot" zeigt. 

    Gerade da setzt meine Argumentation ja an. Da mich die Ampel gar nicht betrifft, gilt das auch für die zugehörige Haltelinie. Die Haltelinie ist ja keine unbedingte Aufforderung zum Anhalten, sondern markiert nur die Stelle, an der ich halten muss, wenn ich vor der Ampel warte. Da ich aber als Rechtsabbieger keinen Anlass habe, überhaupt an der Ampel zu warten, hat auch die Haltelinie keine Bedeutung. Das hat für mich dieselbe Qualität wie wenn die Ampel Grün zeigt. Auch dann brauche ich ja nicht anzuhalten, und die Haltelinie braucht mich nicht zu kümmern.

    Die Frage ist natürlich im Ernstfall nicht, wie ich das sehe, und sei es noch so logisch, sondern wie der zuständige Polizeibeamte bzw. Verkehrsrichter das sieht.
    #157Verfasserdirk (236321) 11 Sep. 12, 17:09
    Kommentar
    Eine Bauform der mitten über der Kreuzung hängenden Ampel, die auch in Deutschland eine gewisse Verbreitung gefunden hatte, ist die Heuer-Ampel. - Wiki weiß dazu:

    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampel#Heuer-Ampel
    #158VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 11 Sep. 12, 17:10
    Kommentar
    Here's more on the Marshalite. That photo really brings back memories!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshalite
    #159VerfasserStravinsky (637051) 11 Sep. 12, 17:18
    Kommentar
    Hmm, in dem Wikipedia-Artikel steht weiter oben:

    Bei Rot muss vor der ersten Haltelinie gehalten werden. An Grundstücksausfahrten oder an Taxistandplätzen kann es zwei Haltlinien geben. Die erste Haltlinie ist für den regulären Verkehr verbindlich, wohingegen die zweite, hinter der ersten und damit näher an der Ampel liegende Haltlinie, für den besonderen Verkehr verbindlich ist. Hält der reguläre Verkehr bei Rotlicht nicht an der ersten Haltlinie, liegt gemäß ständiger Rechtsprechung ein Rotlichtverstoß vor.

    Leider im Gegensatz zur gegensätzlichen Behauptung in 152 ohne Quellenangabe.
    #160VerfasserJanZ (805098) 11 Sep. 12, 17:22
    Kommentar
    Nebenbei bemerkt:
    Edit Feuerflieger ist eine echte Hellseherin! Schon in # 151 hat sie die # 180 vorhergesehen und darauf reagiert!
    #161VerfasserNico (DE) (769488) 11 Sep. 12, 17:42
    Kommentar
    Die Starenkästen in unserer Stadt blitzen, sobald die Ampel Rot zeigt und jemand die Haltelinie überfährt. An einer Stelle sehe ich das häufig, wenn die Abbiegerspur Grün zeigt, ein Ortsfremder aber die Linie zu weit links überfährt, weil er erst im letzten Moment bemerkte, dass er dort abbiegen muss. Und einem Freund von mir gelang es einmal, sich von hinten blitzen zu lassen, als er beim Linksabbiegen versehentlich die Haltelinie des Querverkehrs überfuhr. Einen Strafzettel bekam er dafür jedoch nicht.
    #162VerfasserRestitutus (765254) 11 Sep. 12, 17:43
    Kommentar
    @160: Das LG Berlin hat das so entschieden (allerdings ist in #152 die ZfS nicht ganz korrekt zitiert, die Fundstelle hätte heißen müssen: "ZfS 2001, 8"). Allerdings hat das LG Berlin dem die vorgezogene Wartelinie Überfahrenden eine Teilschuld zugesprochen.

    LG Berlin, 31.7.2000, 58 S 516/99 (ZfS 2001, 8)

    "Das Überfahren einer (vorgezogenen) Wartelinie (Zeichen 341 zu § 42 StVO) bei Rotlicht einer Fußgängerbedarfsampel stellt auch dann keinen Rotlichtverstoß dar, wenn auf Höhe dieser Wartelinie das Zusatzschild Nr. 1012-35 ("Bei Rot hier halten") angebracht ist.

    Ähnlich den Lückenfall-Fällen kommt bei Überfahren einer (vorgezogenen) Wartelinie bei Rotlicht einer Fußgängerbedarfsampel eine Mithaftung des Vorfahrtberechtigten wegen eines Verstoßes gegen § 1 II StVO, und zwar i. d. R. nach einer Quote von 1/4, in Betracht, denn der Kraftfahrer auf der Vorfahrtstraße muss bei Rotlicht der Fußgängerampel und zumindest einem haltenden Fahrzeug vor der Wartelinie mit einbiegenden Fahrzeugen aus der Parkplatz- oder Grundstückseinfahrt rechnen und deshalb sein Fahrverhalten hierauf einstellen."
    #163Verfasserneutrino (17998) 11 Sep. 12, 17:54
    Kommentar
    #145, #149 dirk, #147 dodolina:

    Diese Ampeln:
    http://www.auto-motor.at/auto-fotos/Auto-Serv... sind in Österreich bei Kreuzungen in dicht verbautem Gebiet (Städte) verbreitet. Dann kann man nämlich die Halteseile einfach an den umliegenden Gebäuden befestigen.

    Gestern habe ich bei der Fahrt nach Hause extra aufgepasst. Ich komme an dieser Kreuzung http://maps.google.at/maps?q=Sankt+Leonhard&h... von "unten" und biege nach links ab. Direkt an der Haltelinie befindet sich eine Ampel (über der Fahrbahn und ein zweites Mal rechts davon), und nach der Kreuzung, am linken Fahrbahnrand, wird die Ampel wiederholt (für die Linksabbieger). Man kann das auf dem Satellitenbild gut erkennen.
    #164VerfasserChris (AT) (237739) 12 Sep. 12, 09:13
    Kommentar
    @JanZ, #160:

    Ich halte wikipedia für eine eher unsichere Quelle, gerade bei Rechts- und Gesundheitsfragen. Ich nutze wiki zwar auch viel und gerne, aber auch mit viel Vorsicht, gerade bei Themen zu diesen beiden Gebieten. Die wiki-Aussage mit den Haltelinien widerspricht meiner #160 ja nicht. Bei mir ging es nur um das Schild, von Haltelinien war nicht die Rede in meinem Beitrag, da gab es wohl Wartelinien.

    Und was ist jetzt der Unterschied zwischen Wartelinie und Haltelinie *lach* ?
    #165VerfasserMandalor (856590) 12 Sep. 12, 09:54
    Kommentar
    Seit wann ist ein Feuerflieg_er_ eine Hellseher_in_ ?!?
    #166VerfasserFeuerflieger_GMX (252429) 12 Sep. 12, 10:03
    Kommentar
    Das wirst du in #180 erfahren. ;-)
    #167VerfasserBe_Ge (845437) 12 Sep. 12, 10:08
    Kommentar
    Komisch, ich würde mich, glaube ich, eher darüber aufregen, dass ich auf Autobahnen nicht rechts überholen darf, obwohl dort oft eher Platz ist als links.
    Aber ob ich nun in Orten nach der Rechts-vor-Links-Methode oder wie auch immer fahren muss, ist mir eigentlich egal. Es wird immer Momente geben, wo einem das eine sinnvoller erscheint als das andere.
    #168Verfasserulrike_de (745802) 12 Sep. 12, 11:49
    Kommentar
    In the UK, most traffic lights are duplicated -- one in the place you have to stop, which you can see as you approach it, and one on the opposite side of the junction, which you can see when you have stopped. This costs money, which is why the Germans don't do it. It's got nothing to do with the law -- plenty of lights in Germany are some way ahead of the white line where you have to stop.

    The French variant (eye-level lights on the same post as the main traffic light) is probably cheaper, and also more plausible.
    #169Verfasserescoville (237761) 12 Sep. 12, 12:07
    Kommentar
    Seit wann ist ein Feuerflieg_er_ eine Hellseher_in_ ?!?

    Seit Edit(h) ein Frauenname ist. Schließlich ist es Edit, die die Zukunft sieht, und nicht Feuerflieger selbst:
    Edit sieht gerade Postinmg 180

    Der Voraussagezeitraum umfasst schon fast 24 Stunden - großartig!
    #170VerfasserNico (DE) (769488) 12 Sep. 12, 13:33
    Kommentar
    What does the priority road sign even do to promote safety anyway? Why do these signs even exist? If they all disappeared there would probably be even less accidents as idiots would no longer have an excuse to assert the right of way as aggressively as they currently do.

    Armer Floction! Bist du so einem "aggressiven Idioten" reingefahren?
    #171VerfasserEifelblume (341002) 12 Sep. 12, 13:40
    Kommentar
    Mandalor, 165:

    Klar, bei solchen Themen sollte man sich nicht alleine auf die WP verlassen.

    Und was ist jetzt der Unterschied zwischen Wartelinie und Haltelinie *lach* ?

    Ist es nicht so, dass eine (durchgehende) Haltelinie dort aufgemalt ist, wo das Anhalten Pflicht ist, also an einem Stoppschild und an einer Ampel, während eine (unterbrochene) Wartelinie dort ist, wo nur gewartet werden muss, wenn das verkehrsbedingt nötig ist, z.B. beim Linksabbiegen?

    Zu den nicht sichtbaren Ampeln: Ich kann mich nicht erinnern, jemals eine Ampel von der Haltelinie aus nicht gesehen zu haben. Ausnahme: Einmal stand ich in meiner Heimatstadt auf der Geradeausspur und rechts neben mir ein Lkw auf der separat signalisierten Rechtsabbiegerspur. Da wäre das britisch-nordamerikanische Modell sehr nützlich gewesen, das französische dagegen weniger.
    #172VerfasserJanZ (805098) 12 Sep. 12, 13:42
    Kommentar
    This costs money, which is why the Germans don't do it.

    Das bezweifele ich stark. In Deutschland wird gerade im Straßenverkehr derart viel Geld für nutzlose Einrichtungen ausgegeben (z. B. aufwändige Ampelanlagen, die keinen anderen erkennbaren Sinn haben, als den Verkehr zu behindern), dass es darauf nun wirklich nicht mehr ankäme. Nein, Ampeln an der gegenüberliegenden Seite der Kreuzung gibt es einfach deshalb nicht, weil diese sonst in bestimmten Situationen (z. B. beim Abbiegen) zwangsläufig bei Rot passiert werden müssten, und das darf nun mal nicht sein.
    #173Verfasserdirk (236321) 12 Sep. 12, 13:58
    Kommentar
    Eine nicht sichtbare Ampel ist mir auch noch nicht untergekommen, Ausnahmen wie Sicht verdeckt durch LKW mal ausgenommen. Wobei mir sowas auch noch nicht untergekommen ist. Es gibt ja immer Ampel oben (sehr hoch) und jeweils links und rechts (halb hoch). Irgendwo sieht man immer eine Ampel. Und manchmal gibt es auch gegenüber Ampeln, dan naber häufig nur grüne Pfeile, wenn die Spuren gesondert geschaltet sind.
    #174VerfasserMandalor (856590) 12 Sep. 12, 14:20
    Kommentar
    Wo man die Ampel wirklich schlecht sieht, ist in dem kleinen asiatischen Sportwagencabrio meines Bruders, da ist die oberere Begrenzung der Windschutzscheibe im Weg wenn der Wagen ganz vorne steht. Das laste ich aber nicht der Ampel an ;-).
    #175VerfasserRussisch Brot (340782) 12 Sep. 12, 14:40
    Kommentar
    Bruder Brot ist nicht zufällig deutlich kleiner? ;-)
    #176Verfassertigger (236106) 12 Sep. 12, 15:03
    Kommentar
    Eine nicht sichtbare Ampel ist mir auch noch nicht untergekommen,

    Mir aber oft. Es kam schon einige Male vor, dass meine Beifahrerin oder die Tochter auf dem Rücksitz Ausschau halten musste, weil mir das Autodach im Weg war.
    Womöglich ist das modellabhängig.
    #177VerfasserRestitutus (765254) 12 Sep. 12, 15:08
    Kommentar
    #174: die Ampel links auf halber Höhe gibt es nicht überall, z.B. auf mehrspurigen Straßen mit Linksabbiegerspur und eigener Ampelschaltung für die Linksabbieger ist die linke Ampel meistens die Linksabbiegerampel.
    Während der Zeit, in der ich Sachsen gewohnt habe, ist mir aufgefallen, dass es an sehr vielen Kreuzungen die linke Ampel nicht gab.
    #178Verfasserspheniscus (301189) 12 Sep. 12, 15:12
    Kommentar
    weil mir das Autodach im Weg war

    Einfache Lösung: ein Auto mit Glasdach! Würd' ich nie drauf verzichten wollen ...
    #179Verfasserdirk (236321) 12 Sep. 12, 15:13
    Kommentar
    Bruder Brot ist nicht zufällig deutlich kleiner? ;-)

    Bruder Brot ;-) ist ein paar Zentimeter größer als ich und sieht die Ampel oft nur durch ducken. Ich habe aber auch immer vermutet, daß das Auto für Asiaten gebaut wurde, die bekanntlich alle klein sind und dadurch das Problem nicht haben.
    #180VerfasserRussisch Brot (340782) 12 Sep. 12, 15:32
    Kommentar
    SCNR :-)

    die bekanntlich alle klein sind

    besonders z.B. dieser

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yao_Ming
    #181Verfasserwaltherwithh (554696) 12 Sep. 12, 15:46
    Kommentar
    Der ist ja auch nicht Asiate, sondern Basketballer.
    Und die sind bekanntlich alle gross.

    qed. ;)
    #182Verfasserzirp_ (703877) 12 Sep. 12, 15:53
    Kommentar
    Oh, also noch größer. Ja dann muss man wohl leider von einem Fehlkauf sprechen.
    #183Verfassertigger (236106) 12 Sep. 12, 16:07
    Kommentar
    zirp_ versteht mich :-).

    Ist halt eins der Spielzeuge von Bruder Brot, da darf man nicht unbedingt nach dem Sinn fragen *g*.
    #184VerfasserRussisch Brot (340782) 12 Sep. 12, 16:11
    Kommentar
    Dein Bruder heißt nicht zufällig Bernd mit Vornamen ;)?
    #185VerfasserJanZ (805098) 12 Sep. 12, 16:25
    Kommentar
    Kein Asiate, aber Basketballer... :-D

    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muggsy_Bogues

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muggsy_Bogues

    Irgendwo dazwischen ist dann Bruder Brot??? Verglichen zu #181...
    #186Verfasserwaltherwithh (554696) 12 Sep. 12, 16:26
    Kommentar
    Na, Muggsy ist ja auch 1965 geboren,
    und die sind bekanntlich alle klein.
    #187Verfasserzirp_ (703877) 12 Sep. 12, 18:51
    Kommentar
    Re #175 et al: Die Lösung dafür wäre ein geöffnetes Schiebedach oder gleich ein Cabrio. - Es gab mal den Fall eines hochgewachsenen Prominenten (Sportler?), der nur dann sicher fahren konnte, wenn er den Kopf beim Fahren über das Schiebedach hinausragen ließ.

    Re: "nicht sichtbare Ampeln". - Das sind die, die eine Tarnkappe tragen! - ;-)

    Im Ernst: Ampeln können z.B. im Gegenlicht der untergehenden Sonne sozusagen "unsichtbar" werden.
    Dem wird daurch gegengesteuert, dass man die Ampel mit einer Tafel umrahmt, die das Umfeld (und damit störende Hintergrundstrahlung) ausblendet.

    #188VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 12 Sep. 12, 19:11
    Kommentar
    weil mir das Autodach im Weg war
    Einfache Lösung: ein Auto mit Glasdach! Würd' ich nie drauf verzichten wollen ...

    Ich habe eins! Ich kann es sogar auffahren! Aber manchmal stehe ich halt so, dass die Ampel genau über dem Querbalken zwischen Frontscheibe und Dachfenster hängt und ich auch noch raussteigen müsste, um sie zu sehen.
    #189VerfasserRestitutus (765254) 12 Sep. 12, 19:24
    Kommentar
    Bist du denn ein sog. "Sitzriese" und hat dein Auto eher die Proportionen einer Flunder ? - ;-)
    #190VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 12 Sep. 12, 19:28
    Kommentar
    Der Sitz ist halt so blöd positioniert. Wenn er so eingestellt ist, dass ich unten bequem an die Pedale komme, dann sehe ich oben nur den Dachbalken, wenn ich als erster an der Ampel stehe.
    #191VerfasserRestitutus (765254) 12 Sep. 12, 22:14
    Kommentar
    @188
    Es gab mal den Fall eines hochgewachsenen Prominenten (Sportler?), der nur dann sicher fahren konnte, wenn er den Kopf beim Fahren über das Schiebedach hinausragen ließ.
    Ob das sicher war? Bei jedem Auffahrunfall wäre er vom eigenen Autodach geköpft worden...
    #192VerfasserStarost (825755) 12 Sep. 12, 22:53
    Kommentar
    "Bei jedem" ? - Nein, nur beim ersten! - SCNR! ;-))
    #193VerfasserTeddy-Toe (871989) 12 Sep. 12, 23:20
    Kommentar
    @178:
    die Ampel links auf halber Höhe gibt es nicht überall, z.B. auf mehrspurigen Straßen mit Linksabbiegerspur und eigener Ampelschaltung für die Linksabbieger ist die linke Ampel meistens die Linksabbiegerampel.

    Also gibt es da ja doch eine Ampel, die Linksabbiegerampel. Warum sollte dann da auch eine für die anderen Spuren hängen? Rechts hängt ja auch keine für Linksabbieger...

    Ist euch eigentlich schon mal aufgefallen, das viele Ampeln ein je nach Verkehrslage früher oder später einsetzendes Hupsignal abstrahlen, wenn man bei Grün nicht sofort losfährt?
    #194VerfasserMandalor (856590) 13 Sep. 12, 08:12
    Kommentar
    I’ve often noticed that when the main light and the light for a turning lane are positioned right next to each other, one changes only a second or so after the other. There can’t be any practical reason for this in terms of traffic flow; I wonder if it’s for a psychological reason – to remind us that they are in fact two separate systems.
    #195VerfasserStravinsky (637051) 13 Sep. 12, 08:23
    Kommentar
    #188 In 175 steht "Sportwagencabrio", wer lesen kann, ist also klar im Vorteil ;-). Wenn das Dach auf ist, geht wohl auch im-Sitz-hochstemmen, ist aber auch nicht viel besser.
    #196VerfasserRussisch Brot (340782) 13 Sep. 12, 09:06
    Kommentar
    Es gibt so kleine Fresnellinsen, die macht man sich eigentlich hinten an die Heckscheibe um beim Einparken die Stoßstange des Hintermanns zu sehen.
    Diese Linse hatte ich bei meinem vorigen Wagen rumgedreht oben rechts an der Frontscheibe, um damit die Ampeln besser sehen zu können.
    #197VerfasserHarri Beau (812872) 13 Sep. 12, 09:17
    Kommentar
    Ich fahr einen Renault Scenic. Da sitzt man recht hoch, alle Ampeln im Blick.
    #198VerfasserMandalor (856590) 13 Sep. 12, 09:29
    Kommentar
    @193: ROFL
    #199VerfasserEifelblume (341002) 13 Sep. 12, 10:39
    Kommentar
    #194: Nur nützt mir die Linksabbierampel leider so überhaupt nichts, wenn ich auf einer mehrspurigen Straße (z.B. vierspurig mit 1 mal Linksabbieger, einmal Rechtsabbieger und zweimal geradeaus) auf der linken der beiden Geradeausspuren stehe. Da muss ich mir den Hals verrenken, um die Ampel oben zu sehen (oder ich habe Glück, und links sind 2 Ampeln, einmal für die Linksabbieger und einmal für die Geradeausfahrer angebracht).
    Und mir hilft die angeblich immer vorhandene linke Ampel auch nicht, wenn ich z.B. in Freiberg in Sachsen an der Kreuzung B 101 mit B 173 auf der linken der beiden Spuren stehe, denn an dieser Stelle gibt es keine linke Ampel, wie auch an vielen anderen Kreuzungen in der Region.
    Deine Aussage aus 174 Es gibt ja immer Ampel oben (sehr hoch) und jeweils links und rechts (halb hoch) ist in dieser Absolutheit einfach falsch.

    #200Verfasserspheniscus (301189) 13 Sep. 12, 11:14
    Kommentar
    Incidentally, if you're driving in the UK and there's a traffic light with a green arrow pointing left, it doesn't necessarily mean that no traffic's coming from the right. As it says in the Highway Code, if you have a green light, you may proceed 'if it is safe to do so'. It doesn't give you priority.
    #201Verfasserescoville (237761) 13 Sep. 12, 15:34
    Kommentar
    *notier*/ Bruder Brot nutzt das Cabrio nicht richtig. Dach auf und gut ists / *notier*
    scnr
    #202VerfasserMasu (613197) 13 Sep. 12, 15:55
    Kommentar
    @ 195:
    Nein, das hat keine psychologischen Gründe sondern ergibt sich aus dem unterschiedlichen Abstand der Haltlinie zur Konfliktfläche und den damit einhergehenden unterschiedlichen Freigabezeitpunkten. Wird alles genau gemessen und ganz sachlich ausgerechnet.
    An einer grosesen Kreuzung beispielsweise ist der Querverkehr für die Geradeausfahrer schon weg, wenn er vielleicht immer noch die Stelle blockiert, an der die Linksabbieger auf ihren neuen Fahrstreifen treffen würden. Deshalb muß die Freigabe für die Linksabbieger dann etwas später erfolgen. Also nicht Psycho- sondern Technologie.
    #203VerfasserNico (DE) (769488) 13 Sep. 12, 16:27
    Kommentar
    (Resurrecting an older topic -- I followed a link here from a current topic and found this interesting)

    A couple of random notes from one who got his license in the US and drove there for many years, but has now driven for a fair number of years in Germany and other European countries (much less frequently, though, than when in the US).

    Traffic lights and stop lines:
    Und ich wünschte, Amerikaner würden ihre Ampeln da anbringen, wo man halten muß und nicht etliche Meter weiter hinten ;-). Kommt halt drauf an, was man gewohnt ist.
    Back in Drivers' Ed, we learned the following priority for where one needed to stop before entering an intersection (these were burned into my brain after I failed my on-the-road test the first time for stopping at the wrong point):
    1) At the stop line
    2) If there is no stop line, at the stop sign or stop light
    3) If there is no sign or signal, before entering the crosswalk
    4) If none of the above, then before entering the intersection and at a place where you can clearly see any approaching traffic.
    It appears that the stop line and the similar lines in Germany have a different meaning/legal function.
    Regarding the location of the stop lights (before or after the intersection, or both): Since stop lights are an indicator that one must stop, but are not themselves necessarily the stop line itself, where they are positioned in relationship to the intersection is less important in the US than in Germany. (I do have to say, though, that there have been a couple times at which I was more tired than is good while driving that I have had the feeling that I should stop at the red light facing me after I have made a legal left turn on green -- thus treating the stop light in the "Germany way.")
    It's been a while since I've driving in Austria, but I seem to recall (and I get the sense from the discussion here, particularly regarding Austria's variant term from Germany's term for what I know as a stop line) that stop lights may indeed be placed after the intersection there, as they can be in the US.

    Right of way
    At least in Illinois, no driver can claim the actual right of way. Instead, other drivers must yield to that driver (such as to the driver on the right, when both arrive at an uncontrolled intersection or a four-way stop at the same time.) It's a fine difference, but it does at least present a psychological difference. Instead of blasting through an intersection because you "have the right of way," the question one asks is "do I have to yield to that car." I've gotten some indications that that is really what is in German law (except in the case of a road with a yellow diamond or other signage that indicates which road at an intersection has priority), but every German I've known has spoken in terms of "Vorfahrt haben" instead of "Vorfahrt gewähren"). If find that those who feel that they have right of way drive with a certain degree more of aggressiveness than those who drive paying attention to who they must yield. I've gotten used to it here, but I find the more aggressive style here unnecessary.

    Traffic light sequence
    Years ago, some place in the US did have the sequence red-yellow-green, but, as I've heard, it was taken out of the traffic code for a couple of reasons. First, while one does need warning that a light is turning from green to red so that one can prepare to stop, one does not need a warning that a light is turning green. It simply is green, in which case it is OK to go when the intersection is clear, or it is red, which means you need to stay stopped. As happens here often in Germany, some people start to enter the intersection during yellow, anticipating green, in the sequence red-yellow-green. Back before automatic transmissions became the norm, there was the practical side of the yellow light as a warning that green was coming, so you could clutch and shift into gear if you had taken the car out of gear, but, given the scarcity of manual transmissions in the US these days, that is superfluous. (When in the US, I have learned to look for the appearance of yellow for the cross-traffic, so I know that my light will soon be changing to green.)
    #204Verfasserhbberlin (420040) 14 Nov. 13, 15:59
    Kommentar
    Regarding the location of the stop lights (before or after the intersection, or both)

    Dazu habe ich noch eine Frage: Ist in Nordamerika das Rechtsabbiegen bei Rot immer erlaubt, solange kein Schild es verbietet, oder nur dann, wenn die Ampel hinter der Kreuzung steht? Wir waren uns im USA-Urlaub da nämlich nicht so ganz sicher und haben im Zweifel lieber auf Grün gewartet.
    #205VerfasserJanZ (805098) 14 Nov. 13, 16:18
    Kommentar
    The position on the stop light has nothing to do with whether or not a right turn on red is allowed. It is allowed unless there is a sign forbidding it. (It wasn't always so. It was first introduced in only a few states, so you had to be careful in regard to which state you were driving in. When it was found that it didn't lead to gazillions more accidents, injuries or fatalities and that it did improve the flow of traffic considerably, it became a part of Federal code and now applies everywhere.
    What not everyone knows is that a left turn on red is allowed, too: If you are on a one-way street and are making a left turn onto another one-way street, you are allowed to do so on red if cross-traffic allows it.

    und haben im Zweifel lieber auf Grün gewartet. 
    ...and I'd wager that those behind you (if any) tended to honk far less at you than they do in Germany if you don't pull off from a start "half a second" before the light turns green (or if they feel you're not going to pull off half a second before the "light turns green.") I was just down in Phoenix with a rental car and I realized that I should/could have turned right on red, and the car behind had its right-turn signal on, too. The driver behind me didn't get bothered at all. I can't imagine that happening here in Berlin.
    #206Verfasserhbberlin (420040) 14 Nov. 13, 17:18
    Kommentar
    ...and I'd wager that those behind you (if any) tended to honk far less at you than they do in Germany

    Ja, das stimmt, sonst hätten wir die Unsicherheit bezüglich dieser Regel auch schneller wieder abgelegt ;-).
    #207VerfasserJanZ (805098) 14 Nov. 13, 17:21
    Kommentar
    JanZ, soweit ich weiss, ist das in verschiedenen Staaten durchaus unterschiedlich. In Kalifornien ist es erlaubt, in Oregon glaube ich nicht... (oder war's Colorado?!?)
    #208Verfasservirus (343741) 14 Nov. 13, 17:52
    Kommentar
    JanZ: re: "turn on red"

    Nach einigen Jahren in den USA mit viel Autofahren in allen möglichen (aber nicht allen) Staaten, ist mir kein Staat aufgefallen, in dem man nicht bei roter Ampel abbiegen darf, außer es wäre durch ein Schild verboten.
    Die eine Ausnahme ist New York City. An einigen wenigen Einfallstraßen, bei weitem nicht an allen, wird darauf hingewiesen. Eine weitere Eigenart der City of New York ist, dass man 18 Jahre alt sein muss, um dort Auto fahren zu dürfen. Youngster aus New Jersey, die schon früher ihren Führerschein machen, dürfen damit also erst ab dem 18. Geburtstag nach New York City fahren.
    Wohlgemerkt, im restlichen State of New York gelten diese Sonderregelungen nicht.
    #209Verfasserrvaloe (588295) 14 Nov. 13, 19:28
    Kommentar
    ... one does need warning that a light is turning from green to red so that one can prepare to stop, one does not need a warning that a light is turning green.

    I beg to differ. Well, "need" is perhaps a bit too strong, but in Austria we have both: green lights will start flashing four times to indicate that the yellow lights are about to be engaged, and red and yellow lights are displayed together for one second at the end of the red cycle to indicate that the light is about to change to green again.

    The green blinking in particular is sorely missed when driving abroad.
    #210VerfasserCarullus (670120) 14 Nov. 13, 20:53
    Kommentar
    @208: From a NHTSA report (www.nhtsa.gov/people/injury/research/pub/rtor.pdf)
    By January 1, 1980, all 52 jurisdictions in the U.S. (50 states, District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) had passed laws complying with the Energy Policy Act permitting RTOR unless a sign prohibits the turn (New York's law does not apply in New York City). As of January 1, 1994, 43 jurisdictions provided for LTOR and 9 did not.

    @210: As I see it, the yellow light is a warning that something is going to change. There is no need to give a warning before a warning (flashing green before yellow). Plus, why does one need a warning that the light is going to change to green from red? As I mentioned, the result of that, as I have seen it here in Germany and had been found to be the case in the US, is that people start up on yellow and do not wait for the green.

    You may find it convenient and you may be used to it, but in the former case, a warning before a warning is unnecessary, in the strictest sense of that word, and in the latter case, the warning can lead to unsafe situations.
    #211Verfasserhbberlin (420040) 15 Nov. 13, 11:17
    Kommentar
    As I see it, the yellow light is a warning that something is going to change.

    It also means "Stop if you can, proceed if you must", i.e. there is a legal obligation to come to a standstill before the intersection if it's safe to do so. Green flashing, on the other hand, has no such meaning, it's just regular "Go".

    There is no need to give a warning before a warning (flashing green before yellow).

    Let me tell you from experience that it's very convenient. You can safely ignore it, of course.

    Plus, why does one need a warning that the light is going to change to green from red?

    Many European cars still have manual transmission (by choice, these days, if I might add). An additional second or so allows you to switch from neutral, which generally speeds up things. Also, approaching an intersection that is red, with the indication that it's going to change to green momentarily means that I might not have to slow down (as much), and certainly not bring my vehicle to a full standstill only to have to accelerate again a second later.

    As I mentioned, the result of that, as I have seen it here in Germany and had been found to be the case in the US, is that people start up on yellow and do not wait for the green.

    In my 20 years of experience driving on Austrian roads I have yet to see that.
    #212VerfasserCarullus (670120) 15 Nov. 13, 14:08
    Kommentar
    The green blinking in particular is sorely missed when driving abroad.

    Und wie! Das Nicht-Grün-Blinken ist etwas, an das ich mich auch nach 10 Jahren in Deutschland immer noch nicht gewöhnt habe. Blinken ist nicht nur viel auffälliger als das einfache Umspringen von Grün auf Gelb, es ist auch einheitlich und damit berechenbar (es blinkt genau vier Mal, während mir die Dauer der Gelbphase in D unterschiedlich lang zu sein scheint).
    #213VerfasserRE1 (236905) 15 Nov. 13, 16:08
    Kommentar
    Something else related to this topic that maybe Germans could answer is what is the point of having speed limit signs that tell you what the speed limit isn't rather than what is is?
    An example:
    http://www.fahrschule-123.de/images/verkehrss...

    I have learned the sign under the link above informs the driver that the speed limit is now 100Kmh (or is it 80?). Why not just place a sign informing drivers what the new speed limit is rather than telling them what it isn't?


    Another one that doesn't make sense and I would be interested in knowing its purpose is the priority road sign. As in the following image:
    http://xrot.surfingpartner.net/ebay/schilder/...

    Of what use it to a driver to know that they have the "right-of-way" and that someone else has to yield? Wouldn't it make more sense for there to only be a sign for the driver who has to yield? How does this sign improve safety? If anything I would think itś dangerous as it can lead to more aggressive drivers asserting the "right-of-way"

    If the local authorities are going to erect signs, why not erect ones that are more likely to enhance safety rather than encourage aggressive driving?

    Just for kicks there is even a priority road sign that is crossed out which (I guess) to inform the driver that they no longer have the right-of-way. http://www.schilder-jancke.de/images/shop/art...
    What's the point of this? Wouldn't a yield or stop sign make more sense?
    #214VerfasserFroggels (703162) 15 Nov. 13, 17:58
    Kommentar
    Froggels

    You're quite right, the 'priority' sign is absurd. But once you have it, the 'priority cancelled' sign is probably reasonable.

    But lots of signs are absurd. On the road leading out of my daughter's village in Devon, there is a 'speed limit lifted' sign. It refers of course to the 30 mph speed limit in the village, and means the speed limit is now the general one on UK single-carriageway roads, i.e. 60 mph. Now, this road is less than 3 metres wide, and it's never more than 30 metres to the next bend, and the road is lined by high banks. So to keep to the terms of the Highway Code (your braking distance must not be longer than the distance you can see), you can't go at more than about 20 anyway. But as one Canadian visitor put it: The speed limit on this road is higher than on any highway in Canada.
    #215Verfasserescoville (237761) 15 Nov. 13, 18:33
    Kommentar
    zu 1. (Ende der Geschwindigkeitsbeschränkung) <-- Der Name sagt es schon: Das Schild informiert dich, dass eine speziell für einen Straßenabschnitt ausgesprochene Geschwindigkeitsbeschränkung aufgehoben wurde, und du wieder die erlaubte Höchstgeschwindigkeit (50/100/nach oben offen) fahren darfst (die erlaubten Höchstgeschwindigkeiten muss man dafür natürlich wissen ;-) ). Spart eine Reihe Schilder, ansonsten müsste man die erlaubte Geschwindigkeit nach jeder Kreuzung wieder beschildern. Genau das passiert <br/>
    bei 2. (Vorfahrtsstraße): Dies Schild sagt dir, dass du dich auf der Straße befindest, die Vorfahrt hat. Die Standardvorfahrtsregelung in DE ist Rechts-Vor-Links, und jede Abweichung muss beschildert werden. Wenn du kein Schild zur Vorfahrt siehst, gilt immer Rechts-vor-Links. Daher auch die Wiederholung an jeder Kreuzung.

    3. Schild 307 ist ein Schild, das außerhalb geschlossener Ortschaften verwendet wird. Es weist also auf einer Landstraße, auf der 100! gefahren werden darf, nochmal deutlich darauf hin: "Achtung, hier endet Deine Vorfahrt!". Ich habe aber auch oft Zeichen 205 als Vorankündigung ("200m") gesehen. Schild 307 steht dann aber trotzdem direkt an der Kreuzung.
    #216VerfasserGuggstDu (427193) 15 Nov. 13, 18:41
    Kommentar
    #214: Wie kommst Du darauf, dass das Tempolimit nach dem Schild im 1. Link 100 km/h sein soll? Es kann genausogut sein, dass nach dem Schild kein Tempolimit mehr gilt, es kommt doch darauf an, wo genau dieses Schild steht. Steht es an einer einspurigen Landstraße, ist das Tempolimit danach 100 km/h, steht es an einer autobahnähnlich ausgebauten Straße mit mind. 2 räumlich getrennten Spuren in jede Richtung (an die exakte Bezeichnung kann ich mich nicht erinnern), dann gilt danach kein Tempolimit, genauso wie auf Autobahnen.

    Wieso ist das Vorfahrtstraßenschild überflüssig? Dieses Schild zeigt mir an, dass ich mich nicht jeder Kreuzung vorsichtig nähern und ggf einem Fahrzeug von rechts Vorfahrt gewähren muss. Je nachdem, wie die Kreuzung angelegt ist, kann ich nicht erkennen, ob die anderen Straßen an einer Kreuzung ein Vorfahrtachten Schild haben oder nicht.

    Wieso ist das Schild Ende der Vorfahrtsstraße überflüssig? Ein Schild Vorfahrt achten hat eine andere Bedeutung, bei Vorfahrt achten muss man auf Fahrzeuge von rechts und links achten, wenn die Vorfahrtstraße endet und weitere Kreuzungen nicht beschildert sind, muss man nur den Fahrzeugen von rechts Vorfahrt gewähren, hat aber selber Vorfahrt gegenüber allen Fahrzeugen von links. Wenn ein Stoppschild steht, muss ich immer anhalten, egal ob ein Fahrzeug von rechts oder links kommt, ohne weitere Schilder kann ich (wenn die Kreuzung weit genug einsehbar ist) ohne Anhalten durchfahren.
    #217Verfasserspheniscus (301189) 15 Nov. 13, 18:46
    Kommentar
    Da ich den vorigen Beitrag wegen der spitzen Klammern nicht mehr editieren kann:
    Man kann Vorfahrt natürlich auch durch bauliche Maßnahmen regeln: Eine Straße, die eine Kantsteinabsenkung hat, ist nie vorfahrtberechtigt, auch nicht nach Rechts-vor-Links. Es ist dann eine Einmündung.
    Man könnte natürlich Haltelinien auf die Straße malen, aber auch da müsste man sie an jeder Kreuzung neu aufmalen und alle Jahre erneuern. In Deutschland nageln wir einfach nur ein Schild an einen Pfosten, das hält die nächsten 30 Jahre. ;-)
    #218VerfasserGuggstDu (427193) 15 Nov. 13, 18:48
    Kommentar
    @Froggels:
    (1) Jede Geschwindigkeitsbeschränkung wird ja irgendwo wieder aufgehoben, dafür das Zeichen. Dann gilt wieder die für den Straßentyp vorgeschriebene Geschwindigkeitsbeschränkung (50 im Ort, 100 außerorts, 130 [AT]/c [DE] auf der Autobahn).

    (2) Wie weiter oben schon mehrfach ausgeführt, ist es sinnvoll, zu wissen, dass man sich auf einer Vorrangstraße befindet. Erstens müsste man sonst bei jeder Querstraße abbremsen und sich vergewissern, dass diese ein Stopp- oder Vorrang-geben-Schild hat und zweitens gelten zumindest in AT weitere Regeln speziell auf Vorrangstraßen (siehe #82).
    #219VerfasserRE1 (236905) 15 Nov. 13, 18:48
    Kommentar
    Wie weiter oben schon mehrfach ausgeführt, ist es sinnvoll, zu wissen, dass man sich auf einer Vorrangstraße befindet.

    That presupposes that your traffic law knows the expression 'priority road'. But that too is quite superfluous. At least, in GB we make do perfectly well without, and save on hundreds of thousands orange and white squares as a result. At any given junction, you assume you have priority unless there's a sign or road markings to tell you you haven't.
    #220Verfasserescoville (237761) 15 Nov. 13, 19:45
    Kommentar
    Well, you're driving on the wrong side of the road as well, not to put too fine a point on it. All kidding aside, the concept of "priority road" is an important one in some countries' motor vehicle codes.

    Case in point, Austria: On a priority road you MUST NOT pull over on the left-hand curb ("links zufahren"), make a U-turn or park outside the city limits (Freiland) when it's dark or foggy (except where indicated). There are a few other things as well, but that's the gist. You MAY overtake other cars even directly on an intersection, however, and of course you've got the right of way.

    Wouldn't you agree that it is necessary to know when, exactly, you find yourself on such a priority road? Other countries may decide to handle this differently, of course, in which case this sign might not be needed.
    #221VerfasserCarullus (670120) 15 Nov. 13, 20:19
    Kommentar
    Es gibt einen fundamentalen Unterschied zwischen Nord Amerika und Deutschland, was die ganze Vorfahrtsgeschichte angeht. Zuerst ist in Amerika der Begriff "Vorfahrtstraße" so gut wie unbekannt. Unter dem Begriff "priority road" würde ein Amerikaner eher etwas von Schneeräumung verstehen als von der Vorfahrt.
    Man kann auch pauschal davon ausgehen, dass man in Nordamerika die Vorfahrt immer hat, bis sie weggenommen wird, wobei in Deutschland muss die Vorfahrt durch ein Vorfahrtschild oder die "rechts-vor-links Regel" (was in Amerika nicht gibt) explizit gewährt werden. Wenn man das einmal versteht, kann dann erst verstehen, warum Nordamerikaner die europäischen Vorfahrtschilder als überflüssig betrachten.

    hbberlin #204 hat es genau perfekt erklärt. In Nordamerika gibt es so gut wie keine Vorfahrt, sondern nur Vorfahrt gewähren also wären Vorfahrschilder dort absolut überflüssig: "...no driver can claim the actual right of way. Instead, other drivers must yield to that driver .... Instead of blasting through an intersection because you "have the right of way," the question one asks is "do I have to yield to that car? ....every German I've known has spoken in terms of "Vorfahrt haben" instead of "Vorfahrt gewähren".
    #222VerfasserTeleArt (412985) 15 Nov. 13, 21:25
    Kommentar
    escoville, welche ist denn die Grundregel im britischen Straßenverkehr bezüglich der Vorfahrt? In Deutschland ist es, wie schon erwähnt "rechts-vor-links" (die IMMER gilt, außer ein Schild sagt anderes). Das heißt, ich muss mich an jeder Kreuzung und Einmündung vergewissern, dass keiner von rechts kommt, und sei es ein Opa mit Handwagen auf der Straße. Und dass der, der von links kommt, mich sieht.

    "assuming you have priority unless there's a sign or road markings to tell you you haven't." sounds like an accident waiting to happen. Da müssen noch mehr Regeln mit im Spiel sein. Und wenn es nur ist: "Erreichen zwei Fahrzeuge zur gleichen Zeit die Kreuzung, müssen sich die Fahrer abstimmen, wer als erster fährt." Das ist dann genau so eine vorfahrtregelnde Anweisung, wie RvL, nur dass man gucken und winken muss.
    Und wenn der andere ein Stinkstiefel sein will, kann er doch einfach losfahren, oder?
    #223VerfasserGuggstDu (427193) 15 Nov. 13, 21:38
    Kommentar
    Bin mal gespannt auf escovilles Antwort.
    Plausibel wäre: Ohne Zeichen hat Vorfahrt, die andere Straße braucht ein Schild: Vorfahrt achten oder Stopp.

    Dann müsste man mal eine Zählung machen, was mehr Schilder erfordert: RvL/LvR oder "Vorfahrt ohne Schild" ;-)
    Es ist ja ein Trend, in Wohngebieten den Schilderwald zu lichten zugunsten RvL.
    #224Verfassermanni3 (305129) 15 Nov. 13, 21:45
    Kommentar

    manni3 #224 Plausibel wäre: Ohne Zeichen hat Vorfahrt, die andere Straße braucht ein Schild: Vorfahrt achten oder Stopp.

    Das ist GENAU wie es in Nordamerika funktioniert, und wie ich es in #222 erklaren wollte. Wenn es keine hartnackige rechts-vor-links Regelung gibt, wie in Deutschland, ist das alles kein Problem. ...Einfach weiterfahren bis man an ein Stopschild, Vorfahrt gewähren, oder Ampel ankommt.
    #225VerfasserTeleArt (412985) 15 Nov. 13, 21:54
    Kommentar
    Manni, mir fiel gerade noch ein, dass die Briten gerne mit Linien auf der Straße arbeiten. Ich bin nie in GB Auto gefahren (und Fahrrad nur vor über 25 Jahren), also erinnere ich mich nicht mehr, aber es ist möglich, dass diese Linien auch an den Einmündungen klar machen: "Hier halten! Du hast keine Vorfahrt." Und damit wäre die Behauptung, die Schilder wären überflüssig, ad absurdum geführt. Die Briten investieren das Geld nur anstatt dessen in Fahrbahnmarkierungen... ;-).

    Edit: Ein bisschen Rumgoogeln hat genau dies ergeben: Die Briten verwenden Fahrbahnmarkierungen um dem Fahrer zu vermitteln ob er Vorfahrt hat oder gewähren muss: http://www.driving-test-success.com/road-lane...
    Diese Fahrbahnmarkierungen sind in D nicht notwendig, ein Schild Stop oder Vorfahrt gewähren ist ausreichend.
    #226VerfasserGuggstDu (427193) 15 Nov. 13, 21:54
    Kommentar
    Es ist ein Trend, durch RvL den Schilderwald bes. in Wohngebieten zu lichten* und das Tempo zu drosseln. Das hat doch durchaus Vorteile.

    * Edit: und die oft renovierungsbedürftigen weißen Streifen zu vermeiden. Und es schneit halt nie in GB ;-))
    #227Verfassermanni3 (305129) 15 Nov. 13, 21:56
    Kommentar
    >>Da müssen noch mehr Regeln mit im Spiel sein. Und wenn es nur ist: "Erreichen zwei Fahrzeuge zur gleichen Zeit die Kreuzung, müssen sich die Fahrer abstimmen

    There are a few more rules, but not many. Larger roads have priority over smaller roads, and a road with through traffic has priority over a road that's ending (a T-shaped intersection). But all those cases are virtually always marked with a yield sign, stop sign, flashing red light (= stop sign), or traffic light.

    On streets of the same size, the intersection may have a 4-way stop sign, which means that everyone has to stop. Technically, that's the one case where if they arrive at the same time, the traffic on the right has the right of way. But it's not safe to assume the other driver always remembers that rule, so yes, in practice you do very often just make eye contact and the more chivalrous person waves the other on. (-:
    #228Verfasserhm -- us (236141) 15 Nov. 13, 22:20
    Kommentar
    Mir fiel gerade folgendes ein: Ich glaube, der Unterschied zwischen Deutschland einerseits und GB & USA andererseits ist der gleiche wie bei den Rechtssystemen.
    Deutschland als Civil Law-Land bezahlt seine Volksvertreter dafür dass sie ein Gesetz (Verwaltungsverordnung) zur Vorfahrtregelung machen. In GB und USA als Common Law-Länder wird das durch Verhandlung erledigt (an der Kreuzung durch Handzeichen, nach erfolgtem Crash durch die Anwälte vor Gericht).
    *duck und renn* ;-)
    #229VerfasserGuggstDu (427193) 15 Nov. 13, 22:40
    Kommentar
    Vielleicht steh' ich gerade total auf dem Schlauch... aber mal abgesehen davon, dass es offenkundig auch Verkehrssysteme gibt, die ohne Vorfahrtschilder auskommen - was ist denn schlimm an einem System mit Vorfahrtschildern? Tun die irgendwem weh?

    Die Theorie, dass es zu aggressiverem Fahren führt, halt ich für - gelinde gesagt - absurd.
    Auf den allermeisten Straßen wird eine Person durchfahren können und die andere warten müssen, wenn sie sich an einer Kreuzung treffen (steht zumindest zu hoffen). Und die müssen beide Bescheid wissen, wer hier wer ist, damit der Verkehr sicher ist und nicht ständig stockt.

    Ob man das an der Breite der Straße, dem Fehlen oder Vorhandensein blinkender roter Lichter oder abgesenkter Bordsteinkanten, dem Fehlen oder Vorhandensein eines Stoppschilds, der Tatsache, dass man von rechts oder von links kommt, oder eben durch eine gelbe Raute erfährt, scheint irgendwie ziemlich irrelevant dafür, wie man sich verhält (nämlich entweder warten und den anderen durchlassen, oder selber durchfahren).

    Das einzig wichtige ist, dass es für jeden Verkehrsteilnehmer schnell und zuverlässig erfassbar ist, in welcher Position er gerade ist. Das scheinen ja alle mit ihrem jeweiligem System hinzukriegen.
    #230Verfasserpelican island (339101) 16 Nov. 13, 00:13
    Kommentar
    Die Theorie, dass es zu aggressiverem Fahren führt, halt ich für - gelinde gesagt - absurd.  
    - Jedenfalls führt RvL zu langsamerem Fahren, weil man nicht einfach mit der erlaubten Höchstgeschwindigkeit (oder noch schneller) auf der Vorfahrtstraße durch eine Siedlung brettern kann, sondern bei jeder Einmündung mit dem Verkehr von rechts rechnen muss und zu entsprechender Umsicht gezwungen ist. Die Bußen für Tempoüberschreitungen kann man einfach als guter Sportsmann als relativ seltene Nebenkosten abhaken und bezahlen; wenns wegen missachteter Vorfahrt ans eigene heilige Blechle geht, ist das emotional wesentlich schlimmer und zudem auch teurer ;-)
    #231Verfassermanni3 (305129) 16 Nov. 13, 00:32
    Kommentar
    Die Theorie, dass es zu aggressiverem Fahren führt, halt ich für - gelinde gesagt - absurd.

    Ich auch, aber das gilt auch für die 4-fach-"Alle-haben-Wartepflicht"-Stopptafeln. Ich bin der Meinung es sollte bei jeder Kreuzung klar und womöglich schon während der Annäherung erkennbar sein, wer hier Vorrang hat, und wer Wartepflicht. Auf die Details kommt es, wie Du richtig sagst, nicht an. Auf ein Wischi-Waschi-System (alle müssen einmal stehenbleiben, und der höflichste fährt als letzter weiter) kann ich gut und gern verzichten.
    #232VerfasserCarullus (670120) 16 Nov. 13, 08:09
    Kommentar
    every German I've known has spoken in terms of "Vorfahrt haben" instead of "Vorfahrt gewähren"). I find that those who feel that they have right of way drive with a certain degree more of aggressiveness than those who drive paying attention to whom they must yield. I've gotten used to it here, but I find the more aggressive style here unnecessary. - I totally agree.

    My father used to always say, when at the wheel of a car, the only thing you can safely assume is that other people are idiots. He taught me not think in terms of me having the ROW but instead to consider yielding it to others. Merely assuming that you have the right of way (Vorfahrt haben) is fundamentally dangerous because you have no way of knowing for sure if another car is going to yield to you (Vorfahrt gewähren) Only one of these actions is going to result in less accidents.

    I think the problem with traffic-related discussions is that the German language doesn't have a single word for the concept of "safety":

    Ich auch, aber das gilt auch für die 4-fach-"Alle-haben-Wartepflicht"-Stopptafeln. Ich bin der Meinung es sollte bei jeder Kreuzung klar und womöglich schon während der Annäherung erkennbar sein, wer hier Vorrang hat, und wer Wartepflicht.

    The bold italics is exactly what hberlin No204 is on about. At a 4-way-stop it is irrelevant who may go first.(in most cases there is only one car anyway) The point of a 4-way-stop is to avoid accidents by stopping and to not enter the intersection until it is safe to do so. Remaining stopped and letting another car go will not cause an accident - ergo es gibt keine Vorfaht, nur Vorfahrt gewähren!

    Yes, there is a convention (not a law) that states that the car that stops first, goes first, and if two arrive at the same time, then (here it goes) the one on the right goes first. There is no hand signaling, and even if there were, it's still safer than not having stopped at all.
    #233VerfasserJillHammond (870292) 16 Nov. 13, 10:58
    Kommentar
    Meinem Sohn ist bei der Führerscheiprüfung folgendes passiert: Er fuhr auf eine Kreuzung zu, und auf der bevorrechtigen, kreuzenden Straße kam ebenfalls ein Auto. Beide hielten an. Der vorfahrtsberechtige Fahrer forderde meinen Sohn per Handzeichen auf zu fahren, d.h. er verzichtete auf sein Vorfahrt. Nach kurzem Zögern fuhr mein Sohn los. Damit war die Fürherscheinprüfung beendet und eine Wiederholung fällig.
    Der trockene Kommentar des Fahrlehrers: Niemals auf Handzeichen achten. Es könnte sein, das der Fahrer nur Fliegen fängt.
    Soviel zur Verständigung mit Handzeichen auf deutschen Straßen.
    #234Verfassereineing (771776) 16 Nov. 13, 11:13
    Kommentar
    Wahrscheinlich muss der Prüfer nach Regelbuch und nicht nach Menschenverstand prüfen ... Ich wohne an einer Seitenstraße einer Rechts-Vor-Links-Straße, die viel befahren und viel beparkt wird. Da kann ich gar nicht auf meiner Vorfahrt bestehen, sondern lasse regelmäßig von links kommende Wagen durch (ja, per Handzeichen!), die sonst - weil ihre Straßenseite zugeparkt ist - auf der Spur halten müssten, auf die ich einbiegen will.
    #235VerfasserRaudona (255425) 16 Nov. 13, 11:18
    Kommentar
    eineing, For a test he should have continued waiting. Remember, with Germans ze rules always trump commonsense without exception. A law forbidding eating in the home would be enough to kill many of them off.

    At least your son stopped where there otherwise could have been an accident and he can always retake the test and use his head later on.
    #236VerfasserJillHammond (870292) 16 Nov. 13, 11:22
    Kommentar
    "assuming you have priority unless there's a sign or road markings to tell you you haven't." sounds like an accident waiting to happen.

    It may sound like that, but there are still fewer accidents in the UK than in Germany (though the gap is narrowing). But in fact the 'rule' is (in practice) exactly the same as in Germany, just substitute 'no sign' for 'Vorfahrt sign'. But a driver in the UK never 'has the right of way' in any positive sense. Even a green light does not give you the right of way. It's just that the other driver may positively NOT have it (give-way sign, stop sign, red light).
    #237Verfasserescoville (237761) 16 Nov. 13, 13:25
    Kommentar
    Mir fiel gerade folgendes ein: Ich glaube, der Unterschied zwischen Deutschland einerseits und GB & USA andererseits ist der gleiche wie bei den Rechtssystemen.
    Deutschland als Civil Law-Land bezahlt seine Volksvertreter dafür dass sie ein Gesetz (Verwaltungsverordnung) zur Vorfahrtregelung machen. In GB und USA als Common Law-Länder wird das durch Verhandlung erledigt (an der Kreuzung durch Handzeichen, nach erfolgtem Crash durch die Anwälte vor Gericht).


    GuggstDu has come close to putting into the well-known nutshell, I’d say. Where narrow country roads cross, or in residential areas, having no fixed right-of-way rules forces drivers to drive more cautiously, resulting in fewer accidents.

    Slightly OT: I’ve just spent five days in Amsterdam; cyclists, car and tram drivers and pedestrians there have developed avoiding an accident by centimetres to a fine art; and not once did I witness an altercation between any road users.

    #238Verfassermikefm (760309) 16 Nov. 13, 13:26
    Kommentar
    @236
    Ach, ist das so. Ja, du musst es ja wissen.
    #239Verfasserpelican island (339101) 16 Nov. 13, 14:13
    Kommentar
    I’ve just spent five days in Amsterdam; cyclists, car and tram drivers and pedestrians there have developed avoiding an accident by centimetres to a fine art (#238)

    It it anything like this?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdHkRkwJvww
    #240VerfasserStravinsky (637051) 16 Nov. 13, 14:36
    Kommentar
    Not dissimilar :-) The cyclists ( an incredible number) nearly all ride old sit-up-and-beg bikes, many without lights; and I saw not one wearing a helmet. It's quite scary crossing streets until you realize they are very skillful; lots of scooters on the bike tracks too.
    #241Verfassermikefm (760309) 16 Nov. 13, 14:44
     
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  
 
 
  • Pinyin
     
  • Tastatur
     
  • Sonderzeichen
     
  • Lautschrift
     
 
:-) automatisch zu 🙂 umgewandelt