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    who or whom?

    Comment

    We must see who benefits from their race, who is disproportionately impacted by negative stereotypes about their race, and to who power and privilege is bestowed upon.


    Why isn't it "to whom"?

    Author penguin (236245) 05 Mar 21, 15:31
    Comment

    Und könnte/sollte es nicht heißen:


    ...and upon whom power and privilege is/are bestowed ???

    #1Author wienergriessler (925617)  05 Mar 21, 15:41
    Comment

    Warum "to" und warum nicht "and whom ... upon"? Die Kombi von "to" und "upon" find ich komisch. AWWDI

    #2Author B.L.Z. Bubb (601295) 05 Mar 21, 15:45
    Comment

    Ja, sowas dachte ich auch. 'to' und 'upon' ist ein bisschen viel Präposition.


    Re who/whom: Das halte ich einfach für ein Beispiel dafür, dass 'whom' eine gefährdete Art ist.


    Edit: Das kam gleichzeitig mit #2, war also eigentlich eine Reaktion auf wienergriessler. Passt aber auch auf Bubb.

    #3Author Gibson (418762)  05 Mar 21, 15:45
    Comment

    Der Satz geht noch weiter, das ist für die Konstruktion aber mE unerheblich.


    ...power and privilege is bestowed upon – earned or not – because of their race, their class, and their gender.

    #4Author penguin (236245) 05 Mar 21, 15:46
    Comment

    Careless writing/editing. "upon" or "on" are the possible prepositions with "bestow"---I'd likely use "on" since it's less formal. And "who"/"whom"---as Gibson says ... One could also take issue with the sing. "is" after "power and privilege."

    #5AuthorBion (1092007)  05 Mar 21, 15:58
    Comment

    It appears to me that Ms. Eddo-Lodge's publisher skimped on the proofreading. I'd prefer the structure in #1. (My first hunch was to go with "are," but I suspect that Ms. Eddo-Lodge is treating them as a single entity, thus the singular verb.)

    Re #4: When I found the complete quote, I first questioned if the rest of the sentence would influence the first part. Reading it a few times, I concluded that it didn't, even if it were "cleaned up" as per #1.


    Re who/whom: Das halte ich einfach für ein Beispiel dafür, dass 'whom' eine gefährdete Art ist.

    Yes.

    #6Author hbberlin (420040) 05 Mar 21, 16:02
    Comment

    'whom' eine gefährdete Art ?


    Yes, in almost all situations, except in the most formal writing, but not after a preposition. When following "to", "from", "on", "upon", etc., "whom" still is obligatory.

    #7Author Martin--cal (272273) 05 Mar 21, 17:12
    Comment

    Yes, absolutely right ("not after a preposition").

    #8AuthorBion (1092007) 05 Mar 21, 18:00
    Comment

    "to who it may concern"


    the mind boggles, shudders, cringes and feels a deep desire to crawl into a quiet corner to die.

    #9Author B.L.Z. Bubb (601295) 05 Mar 21, 18:06
    Comment

    And if you do, we will never send to know for whom the bell tolls. 🙂

    #10Author Martin--cal (272273)  05 Mar 21, 20:52
     
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