Advertising
LEO

It looks like you’re using an ad blocker.

Would you like to support LEO?

Disable your ad blocker for LEO or make a donation.

 
  •  
  • Forum home

    Language lab

    Übungen zur Satzbildung (Sentence-making Exercises)

    Topic

    Übungen zur Satzbildung (Sentence-making Exercises)

    Comment

    ★001


    1.1▸Ich kenne die Nachrichten sehr gut.

    (I know the news very well.)

    1.2▸Ich kenne die Nachrichten nicht genau / nicht besonders gut.

    (I don't really know the news.)


    2.1▸Ich weiß nicht genau, wie der Autounfall aufgetreten hat.

    (I don't really know how the car accident occurred.

    2.2▸Ich habe die Stimme gehört, die Tür geöffnet und nach draußen getreten, und da hat er  shone/bereits  gewesen/gelegen.

    (I heard the voice, opened the door and stepped outside, and it was already there/ lay there already.


    Danke schön im Voraus für Deine Hilfe.

    Author azhong (1362382)  09 Sep 22, 06:02
    Comment

    "Ich kenne die Nachrichten sehr gut." - grammatikalisch richtig, aber ich halte den Satz nicht für idiomatisch. Ich denke, üblicher wäre "ich weiß sehr gut über die Nachrichten Bescheid."


    "Ich kenne die Nachrichten nicht genau / nicht besonders gut." - ebenfalls grammatikalisch OK, aber unüblich.


    "Ich weiß nicht genau, wie der Autounfall aufgetreten hat." - "wie der Autounfall geschehen ist."


    "Ich habe die Stimme gehört, die Tür geöffnet und nach draußen getreten, und da hat er shone/bereits gewesen/gelegen." - "Ich habe die Stimme gehört, die Tür geöffnet und BIN nach draußen getreten, und da hat er SCHON/bereits gewesen/gelegen."

    #1Author B.L.Z. Bubb (601295) 09 Sep 22, 08:47
    Comment

    Variante zum vorletzten Satz: wie der Autounfall passiert ist.

    Letzter Satz: da hat es schon da gelegen (und es lag bereits/schon da).

    #2Author eastworld (238866) 09 Sep 22, 09:42
    Comment

    > Re 1.1 and 1.2:

    Like B.L.Z. Bubb, I think both your German sentences are grammatically correct but not idiomatic.

    Instead of using Nachrichten/ news in connection with the verb kennen/ to know, I suggest you use – for example – der Mann/ die Frau as a more fitting object:


    1.1▸Ich kenne den Mann sehr gut.

    (I know the man very well.)

    1.2▸Ich kenne die Frau nicht genau / nicht besonders gut.

    (I don't really know the woman / very well.)


    > Re 2.1:

    I support both B.L.Z. Bubb's and eastworld's corrections:

    Ich weiß nicht genau, wie der Autounfall geschehen/ passiert ist.


    > Re 2.2:

    I confirm B.L.Z. Bubb's correction for the first part of your sentence, but would also omit the first und/ and:

    Ich habe die Stimme gehört, die Tür geöffnet, bin nach draußen getreten, und […]


    But then, to be honest, I don't understand the second part of neither your German nor your English sentence exactly.


    What would you like to express with

    und da hat er schon/ bereits gewesen/ gelegen // and it was already there/ lay there already?

    What or who was already (laying) there (where?)


    Some kind of context would be helpful in order to possibly find an unambiguous translation for this part of your sentence.

    NB: Without any further information, all of the suggestions made by B.L.Z. Bubb and eastworld may be possible.


    #3Author karla13 (1364913)  09 Sep 22, 16:15
    Comment

    #3 karla13: 

    "What would you like to express with

    und da hat er schon/ bereits gewesen/ gelegen // and it was already there/ lay there already?

    What or who was already (laying) there (where?)"


    Indeed. My sentences are confusing. I should say it more precisely.

    "...and the car accident scene was/lay there already"?


    So, how about

    ?...getreten, und da hat die Autounfallstelle/sie bereits gelegt.

    ?...getreten, und da ist sie bereits gewesen.

    -die Autounfallstelle: car accident scene


    #2 eastworld: 

    "da hat es schon da gelegen."


    Q: Ich verstehe nicht, warum es zwei "da" gibt. Ich vermute, dass das zweite "da" auf Englisch "there" entspricht. Was entspricht das erste dann? Es sieht nicht wie eine Konjunktion aus.


    (I think I know why esatworld uses "es". When taking the car accident as a fact, it's an "es" in German. Or is my understanding wrong?)


    Danke schön, auch für alle der Kommentare, die ich bekommen habe.

    #4Author azhong (1362382)  10 Sep 22, 06:54
    Comment

    #4 @azhong


    Thank you for your explanation. That changes things. First of all, I would like to make two shorter sentences out of your long sentence. Secondly, we have to change „die Stimme“ (singular, definite article) into „Stimmen“ (plural, no article), otherwise sentence 2.2 wouldn't make much sense.



    2.2 Ich habe Stimmen gehört, die Tür geöffnet und bin nach draußen getreten.

    (I heard voices, opened the door and stepped outside.)


    2.3 Dort war ein Autounfall geschehen/ passiert.

    (A car accident had happened there.)


    Another possibility:

    2.3 Da war schon alles geschehen/ passiert. („alles“ here means „der Unfall“.)

    (Everything had already happened there).


    Or:

    2.3 Ich sah, dass dort ein Autounfall geschehen/ passiert war.

    (I saw that a car accident had happened there.)


    In fact, there are quite a few possibilities how to phrase sentence 2.3.



    "So, how about

    ?...getreten, und da hat die Autounfallstelle/sie bereits gelegt.

    ?...getreten, und da ist sie bereits gewesen."


    I am afraid both your suggestions are grammatically not correct and not idiomatic.


    -die Autounfallstelle

    Even though you have correctly formed this compound noun, in German one would probably rather use the shorter word Unfallstelle (not specifying what kind of accident it was).


    I will answer your other questions later on if eastworld hasn't replied in the meantime.



    (edit at 23:30)

    I am not eastworld but will nevertheless try to answer the questions addressed to her (I hope she doesn't mind!) so that you can keep on studying on Sunday.


    #2 eastworld: 

    "da hat es schon da gelegen."

    Q: Ich verstehe nicht, warum es zwei "da" gibt. Ich vermute, dass das zweite "da" auf Englisch "there" entspricht. Was entspricht das erste dann? Es sieht nicht wie eine Konjunktion aus.


    Yes, you are right, the first „da“ corresponds to „there“ and is not a conjunction here. In German grammar, it is called a „lokales Adverb“ (adverb defining a place/ location). As far as the second „da“ is concerned, there are IMO two possibilities how to understand it:

    • The second „da“ is a repetition of he first one (like an emphasis) and could be omitted. It reflects eastworld's personal (or regional?) style of speaking/ writing.

    or

    • The second „da“ is the past participle of the verb „daliegen“ and should be correctly written in one word (dagelegen). „daliegen“ means „to lie there“ and is yet missing in LEO.


    > (I think I know why esatworld uses "es". When taking the car accident as a fact, it's an "es" in German. Or is my understanding wrong?)

    Your understanding is indeed wrong. eastworld used „es“ because in your English sentence you wrote „it“, whereas in your German sentence you used „er“. So she just made the concordance between the two languages.


    Further corrections:

    Ich vermute, dass das zweite "da" auf Englisch "there" entspricht.“

    Either:

    Ich vermute, dass das zweite "da" auf Englisch "there" heißt.

    Or better:

    Ich vermute, dass das zweite "da" dem englischen "there" entspricht.

    Or even better:

    Ich vermute, das zweite "da" entspricht dem englischen "there".


    > Was entspricht das erste dann? Was entspricht dann dem ersten? (entsprechen goes with the dative.)

    > Danke schön, auch für alle der Kommentare, die ich bekommen habe.

    > Danke schön im Voraus für Deine Hilfe → Danke (schön)/ Vielen Dank im Voraus für eure Hilfe. (eure (plural) because you are addressing more than one person.)


    #5Author karla13 (1364913)  10 Sep 22, 16:42
    Comment

    ★001 (Corrected)


    ▸Ich weiß schon Bescheid.

    ▸Ich weiß nicht genau über die Nachrichten Bescheid.

    • Bescheid über etw.AKK wissen: to know (about sth.)


    ▸Der Autounfall ist geschehen/passiert.

    ▸Ich weiß nicht genau, wie der Autounfall geschehen ist.


    ▸Ich bin nach draußen getreten.

    ▸Ich habe Stimmen gehört, die Tür geöffnet und bin nach draußen getreten. 

    ▸Da war schon alles geschehen.

    (Everything had already happened there).


    P.S. A note:

    1. English: "all books", "all of the books".

    But German: only "alle Bücher", without *"alle der Bücher".


    2. In English

    What does the word correspond to?, or

    What corresponds to the word?

    , but in German only

    Was entspricht dem Wort?

    #6Author azhong (1362382)  11 Sep 22, 04:54
    Comment

    #5 karla13: re "da hat es schon da gelegen".


    While I go along with most of your #5, I don't quite agree with your analysis of the two "da". It's the second one that is a "lokales Adverb", which you can see from the fact that it can easily be replaced by "dort". That's not changed by the fact that it constitutes, as you say, a part of the verb "daliegen".


    The first "da" refers to a point in time. Example: "Ich kam gestern um 20 Uhr nach Hause, da (=zu diesem Zeitpunkt) war es schon dunkel."


    ---


    #6, azhong: Your corrected version looks fine to me. A very minor point: In spoken language I would prefer "passiert" to "geschehen", but this is probably a personal preference. "geschehen" is definitely not wrong.


    As to your two notes at the end of #6:


    (1) is correct: "alle Bücher", but, unlike in English, not "alle der Bücher".

    (2) is almost correct - you can also invert the cases, but only if you are a little bit more explicit, for example: "Welchem anderen Wort entspricht das Wort xyz?"

    #7Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550)  11 Sep 22, 08:56
    Comment

    Zu "Da hat es schon da gelegen.":

    While I go along with most of your #5, I don't quite agree with your analysis of the two "da". It's the second one that is a "lokales Adverb", which you can see from the fact that it can easily be replaced by "dort". That's not changed by the fact that it constitutes, as you say, a part of the verb "daliegen". (#7)


    Diese Erklärung scheint mir in sich widersprüchlich zu sein. Wenn man von dem komplexen Verb daliegen ausgeht, dann ist das zweite da eine Verbpartikel, also das Erstglied eines trennbaren Verbs, und müsste im Perfekt mit dem Verbstamm zusammengeschrieben werden (dagelegen). Wenn man es dagegen als lokales Adverb ansieht (und deshalb getrennt vom Partizip gelegen schreibt), dann ist es wiederum kein Teil des Verbs daliegen; das Verb lautet dann liegen.

    #8Author Cro-Mignon (751134) 11 Sep 22, 11:24
    Comment

    Da (!) kann ich natürlich nicht widersprechen. Ich nehme den Satz "That's not changed..." bedauernd zurück, stehe aber zum Rest meines Posts #7. Schließlich ist es ursprünglich - in eastworlds #2 - ja auch getrennt geschrieben.

    #9Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550)  11 Sep 22, 11:29
    Comment

    Da (!) bin ich ganz Deiner Meinung. :-)

    Ich halte das erste da auch für ein temporales ('zu diesem Zeitpunkt') und das zweite für ein lokales ('an dieser Stelle') Adverb. Bleibt noch die Frage, ob es es oder er heißen sollte, ob sich der Satz also auf einen Gegenstand (z. B. ein verlorenes Reserverad) oder auf eine Person bezieht. Azhong schreibt im OP zwar er, aber auch it.

    #10Author Cro-Mignon (751134)  11 Sep 22, 11:44
    Comment

    Zu #8

    Danke für deine konzise Ausführung, @Cro-Mignon.

    Ich war gerade dabei, eine Antwort gleichen Inhalts an @Jesse Pinkman zu schreiben, tat mich aber schwer mit der Formulierung. So bist du mir zuvorgekommen und hast viel besser ausgedrückt, was ich (auch) sagen wollte.


    Edit: #10 war eben noch nicht da.

    #11Author karla13 (1364913)  11 Sep 22, 12:00
    Comment

    #11: Du hättest Dich aber, wie Cro-Mignon, auch nur auf meinen widersprüchlichen Satz "That's not changed..:" bezogen und stimmst dem Rest meiner #7 zu?

    #12Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550)  11 Sep 22, 12:08
    Comment

    Unterbrochenes Edit2 zu meiner #11:

    Ich halte das erste da auch für ein temporales ('zu diesem Zeitpunkt') und das zweite für ein lokales ('an dieser Stelle') Adverb.


    Volle Zustimmung auch meinerseits

    #13Author karla13 (1364913)  11 Sep 22, 12:15
    Comment

    Unterbrochenes Edit2 zu meiner #11:

    ('tschuldigung)


    :-)

    #14Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550)  11 Sep 22, 12:20
    Comment

    Zu #12

    Ich möchte meine übrigen (wenigen) Kommentare zu #7 gerne auf Englisch schreiben, da mir azhong in einer PM geschrieben hatte, dass er das (insbesondere bei Erklärungen) besser versteht als Deutsch (er schätzt sich selbst als A1-Deutschlerner ein). Das dauert bei mir etwas länger, als auf Deutsch zu schreiben 😤. Also musst du dich bitte noch etwas gedulden.


    Zu #14

    ('tschuldigung)

    ... macht doch nichts 😉

    #15Author karla13 (1364913) 11 Sep 22, 12:40
    Comment

    Re #7

    >A very minor point: In spoken language I would prefer "passiert" to "geschehen", but this is probably a personal preference. 

    Like Jesse, I prefer "passiert" to "geschehen".


    >(1) is correct: "alle Bücher", but, unlike in English, not "alle der Bücher".

    I am not sure if I correctly understand azhong's question and Jesse's answer. I would translate „all of the books“ with „all(e) die Bücher“.


    >(2) is almost correct - you can also invert the cases, but only if you are a little bit more explicit, for example: "Welchem anderen Wort entspricht das Wort xyz?

    Supported.


    Re #6

    Ich bin nach draußen getreten.

    ▸Ich habe Stimmen gehört, die Tür geöffnet und bin nach draußen getreten.


    In these two sentences, „getreten“ is correct if you want to express that – coming from inside – you now entered something like a balcony, a patio or an open-air corridor.


    In case you rather want to say that – coming from inside – you now went into the street/ into your garden (from where you can clearly see the scene of the accident) you would use „gegangen“ instead of „getreten“. The infinitive of „gegangen“ is „gehen“ (to go, to walk).

    #16Author karla13 (1364913)  11 Sep 22, 15:45
    Comment

    Zu #10 @Cro-Mignon

    >Bleibt noch die Frage, ob es es oder er heißen sollte, ob sich der Satz also auf einen Gegenstand (z. B. ein verlorenes Reserverad) oder auf eine Person bezieht. Azhong schreibt im OP zwar er, aber auch it.


    Ich glaube, das er oder it bezog sich jeweils auf die Unfallstelle. So lese ich jedenfalls azhongs #4. Dort schreibt er ja dann auch sie.

    #17Author karla13 (1364913)  11 Sep 22, 17:06
    Comment

    Ich glaube, das er oder it bezog sich jeweils auf die Unfallstelle.


    Du hast höchstwahrscheinlich recht. Vielleicht meint er/sie so etwas wie eine nach einem Unfall durch Absperrband abgeriegelte Stelle? Oder: "Da war der Unfall schon geschehen."? Kontext ...

    #18Author Cro-Mignon (751134) 11 Sep 22, 18:57
    Comment

    #16: >(1) is correct: "alle Bücher", but, unlike in English, not "alle der Bücher".

    I am not sure if I correctly understand azhong's question and Jesse's answer. I would translate „all of the books“ with „all(e) die Bücher“.


    I understood Azhong's question to mean if indeed in the German version there is no Genitive, whereas in the English one, there is ("all of the books"). Which I confirmed.

    #19Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 11 Sep 22, 19:50
    Comment

    Re #19

    Oh, I see. That makes sense. I misunderstood azhong's question. Thanks for the explanation.

    #20Author karla13 (1364913) 11 Sep 22, 20:11
    Comment

    Zu #18 @Cro-Mignon


    OT

    azhong ist ein Mann.

    Ich denke, Kontext in dem Sinne "gibt es nicht". Es sind wohl einfach Beispiel- und Übungssätze. Woher die Inspiration dafür stammt, weiß ich nicht. Vielleicht verrät er es uns ja bei passender Gelegenheit...


    #21Author karla13 (1364913)  11 Sep 22, 20:24
    Comment

    Guten Morgen. Some polite explanations here.


    Zu #16 karla13: "I am not sure if I correctly understand azhong's question and Jesse's answer. I would translate „all of the books“ with „all(e) die Bücher“.


    I didn't know that. Thank you. My note was to remind myself that “den Bücher.PL.GEN” doesn't work for "of the books".


    Zu #10 @Cro-Mignon, #17 karla13:  er, aber it.


    Well, the story went this way. I wanted to say

    "and the car accident lay there"

    and the car accident is "der Autounfall"

    so I used er in German and it in English.

    (But later I thought "the car accident lay there" might be ungrammatical, so I changed it in #4 into

    "and the car accident scene lay there"

    and changed the corresponded pronoun for "sie".)

    I chose to use a pronoun because my German is still poor.XD

    I'll pay more attention to such details, by adding some notes.)


    Zu #21 karla13: Ich denke, Kontext in dem Sinne "gibt es nicht". Es sind wohl einfach Beispiel- und Übungssätze. Woher die Inspiration dafür stammt, weiß ich nicht. Vielleicht verrät er es uns ja bei passender Gelegenheit...


    Yes, I am just making sentences, not intending to write anything. Usually I start from a couple of words, a phrase or a sentence patten I intended to practice. I try, however, to expand them into a small text-like passage, so that I can also practice the connections among sentences and my creativity. Or else language learning is very boring...


    I'll continue my exercises in the thread. Your comments are very helpful to me, no matter in German or in English. But it's also okay for me if I receive no comments at all. The process of making these sentences is itself helpful.


    It's true my English is better than my German, but Google Translate is also very powerful.XD Actually I also study the German sentences in your replies, most of them are indeed very practical.


    Vielen Dank wieder für eure Kommentare.

    #22Author azhong (1362382)  12 Sep 22, 04:56
    Comment

    Zu #22 @azhong


    Guten Tag, azhong. Danke für deine ausführlichen Erklärungen.


    >My note was to remind myself that “den Bücher.PL.GEN” doesn't work for "of the books".

    Das ist richtig. Der korrekte Genitiv im Plural lautet „der Bücher“.


    >(But later I thought "the car accident lay there" might be ungrammatical, so I changed it in #4 into"and the car accident scene lay there")

    Beide englischen Sätze sind leider nicht idiomatisch. Korrekt wäre zum Beispiel:

    "the car accident happened there" oder „there was the scene of the car accident".


    >I'll pay more attention to such details, by adding some notes.

    Ja, das ist eine gute Idee. Dann versteht man besser, was du ausdrücken möchtest.


    Wir freuen uns auf deine nächsten Übungssätze.

    #23Author karla13 (1364913) 12 Sep 22, 11:40
    Comment

    002 (uncorrected)

    (Ich habe vorgehabt, "wenig", "ein wenig", "wenige", "ein paar" und "ein Paar" zu üben. Vielen Dank im Voraus für eure Hilfe. )


    1▸A: „ Es gibt in meinem Bankkonto bereits weniges Geld.“ 

    (There is already little money in my bank account.)


    2▸B: „ In meinem Bankkonto gibt es noch ein weniges. Ich kann dir ein weniges leihen, wenn du es brauchst.

    (There is still a little money in my bank account. I can lend you some if you need it.) 


    3▸Außerdem habe ich gerade ein paar Brötchen gebacken. Ich kann dir auch ein Paar geben. I habe heute nur wenige gebacken.

    (Besides, I've just baked some rolls. I can also give you two. I haven't baked many today.)


    4▸Ich kann dir aber mehr Brötchen geben, wenn du zwei Tage später wiederkommst.“ 

    (But I can give you more rolls if you come again two days later.)

     

    - Die Bank

    - das Konto: account; pl. Konten/die Kontos/die Konti 

    - leihen | lieh, geliehen | 


    #24Author azhong (1362382)  15 Sep 22, 14:52
    Comment

    Ich mir vorgenommen, "ein wenig" zu üben. (Die anderen Möglichkeiten sind nicht korrekt.)


    1.: "nur noch wenig Geld".

    2.: ein Weniges (das ist hier Substantiv). Ist aber sehr, sehr ungewöhnlich. Hier wäre "ein bisschen" besser - oder eben "wenig".

    3.: Korrekt, wobei es sehr ungewöhnlich ist, zwei Brötchen als "ein Paar" zu bezeichnen. "Ein Paar" verwendet man für zwei Dinge / Menschen, die zusammen gehören und gemeinsam ein Ganzes ergeben (ein Paar Schuhe, ein verheiratetes Paar...).

    4. Völlig korrekt.

    #25Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550)  15 Sep 22, 22:44
    Comment

    Zu #25


    >Ich habe mir vorgenommen, "ein wenig" zu üben. (Die anderen Möglichkeiten sind nicht korrekt.)


    Du hast azhongs Satz missverstanden, Jesse. Er möchte die Wörter/ Ausdrücke "wenig", "ein wenig", "wenige", "ein paar" und "ein Paar" üben. Was er dann in den folgenden 4 Sätzen tut.


    Zu #24 @azhong

    in meinem Bankkonto --> auf meinem Bankkonto


    Gute Nacht, morgen mehr.


    #26Author karla13 (1364913)  15 Sep 22, 23:11
    Comment

    Stimmt. Karla hat mit ihrem Post #26 Recht.

    #27Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 16 Sep 22, 02:30
    Comment

    Q: Is my understanding correct? Thank you.


    a) It seems that "wenig (+ uncountable)" and "ein wenig (+ uncountable)" have the same meaning, "a little"? (This is different from English.) E.g.:

    1. Könntest du mir bitte wenig/ ein wenig/ ein bisschen Essen geben?

    (Could you please give me a little food?


    b) And the corresponding expression for "lillte" is "nur wenig" or "nur noch wenig".

    2. Es tut mir leid. Ich habe auch nur wenig/nur noch wenig Essen.

    (Sorry. I have [only (still) little]/ little food, either.


    c) "Wenig" needs to add an "e" when it's before a plural noun.

    3. Ich habe wenige Bücher.

    (I have a few books.)


    d) But it never needs to change the ending like the other adjectives do.

    4. In der Tasse ist wenig schwarzer Kaffee.

    (In the cup is a little black coffee.)

    5. Es gibt in der Tasse wenig schwarzen Kaffee.

    (There is a little black coffee in the cup.)

    6. Auf dem Tisch sind wenige gute Bücher.

    (On the table are few good books.)

    7. Es geben wenige gute Bücher auf dem Tisch.

    (There are few good books on the table.


    e) ein Weniger/ein Wenige/ein Weniges are nouns (or "Substantiv") out of adjectives "weniger/wenige/weniges" and needed to be capitalized. But this usage is out of date already.

    -Q: Or, maybe the noun out of an adjective can always only be neutral, "ein Weniges", and never "ein Weniger" or "ein Wenige", no matter what it refers to?

    f) A: „Ich brauche Kaffee.“

    B: „Ich habe ein Weniges.“


    -das Essen

    -der Kaffee

    #28Author azhong (1362382)  16 Sep 22, 07:58
    Comment

    Re #24


    My suggestions:


    2▸B: „ Auf meinem Bankkonto gibt es noch (habe ich noch) ein wenig/ ein bisschen Geld. Ich kann dir ein wenig/ ein bisschen leihen, wenn du es brauchst.


    3▸Außerdem habe ich gerade ein paar Brötchen gebacken. Ich kann dir auch ein paar (oder: 2) geben. Ich habe heute nur wenige gebacken.


    Sentence 4 is correct. Another possibility would be:

    4▸Ich kann dir aber mehr Brötchen geben, wenn du in zwei Tagen später wiederkommst.“


    I support Jesse's #25 but would suggest slightly different solutions for sentences 2 and 3. [edited]


    - das Konto: account; pl. Konten/die Kontos/die Konti 

    azhong, the plural form „die Konti“ is very rare. No need to learn it, IMO.

    #29Author karla13 (1364913)  16 Sep 22, 09:49
    Comment

    Re #28


    Q: a) It seems that "wenig (+ uncountable)" and "ein wenig (+ uncountable)" have the same meaning, "a little"?

    A: No, that is unfortunately not correct. „wenig“ means „little“ whereas „ein wenig“ means „some/ a little“. But there are also exeptions where they indeed mean the same.

    1a. Könntest du mir bitte (nur) wenig Essen geben? („wenig“ is stressed here)

    (Could you please give me (only) little food?) („little“ is stressed here)

    1b. Könntest du mir bitte ein wenig/ ein bisschen Essen geben?

    (Could you please give me some food?)

    → IMO, „ein wenig“ and „ein bisschen“ are synonyms.


    Q: b) And the corresponding expression for "little" is "nur wenig" or "nur noch wenig".

    A: No, the corresponding expression for „little“ is „wenig“. By adding „nur“ oder „nur noch“ to „wenig“ you slightly change its meaning, like adding „also/ too“ to „little“ in English.

    2a. Es tut mir leid. Ich habe auch nur wenig Essen.

    (I am sorry. I also have little food.)

    2b. Es tut mir leid. Ich habe auch nur noch wenig Essen.

    (I am sorry. I also have little food left.)


    Q: c) "Wenig" needs to add an "e" when it's before a plural noun.

    A: Not necessarily. Plural forms of the adjective „wenig“ are:

    (Nominativ) wenige, (Genitiv) weniger, (Dativ) wenigen, (Akkusativ) wenige

    Your example is correct:

    3. Ich habe wenige Bücher.

    (I have few books.)


    Q: d) But it never needs to change the ending like the other adjectives do. 

    A: This only applies to the adverb „wenig“ (sentences 4 and 5). As an adjective, it changes its endings (like in 6, 7).

    4. In der Tasse ist wenig schwarzer Kaffee.

    (There is little black coffee in the cup.)

    5. Es gibt in der Tasse wenig schwarzen Kaffee. This sentence is grammatically correct but not idiomatic.

    (There is little black coffee in the cup.)

    6. Auf dem Tisch liegen sind wenige gute Bücher.

    (There are few good books on the table.) I corrected your word order.

    7. Es gibt geben wenige gute Bücher auf dem Tisch. „es gibt“ is a fixed expression in singular and plural alike.

    (There are few good books on the table.)


    Q: e) ein Weniger/eine Wenige/ein Weniges are nouns (or "Substantiv") formed out of the adjectives "weniger/wenige/weniges" and needed to be capitalized. But this usage is out of date already.

    A: Correct.


    Q: Or, maybe the noun formed out of an adjective can always only be neutral, "ein Weniges", and never "ein Weniger" or "eine Wenige", no matter what it refers to?

    A: No, that is not correct. „ein Weniger“ could theoretically refer to another noun in the masculine, and „eine Wenige“ could refer to another noun in the feminine. But please do not ever use those three. They are not idiomatic and hardly make any sense.


    Q: f) A: „Ich brauche Kaffee.“ 

    A:This is correct but could sound impolite in certain contexts.

    B: Ich habe ein Weniges.

    is not correct. You have to reword it: „Ich habe (noch) ein bisschen.“ And even then this somehow sounds clumsy. Sentence B has to be spoken directly after sentence A (and both always together) otherwise it would not make any sense.

    I personally would say: „Ich habe noch etwas.“ or „Ich habe noch welchen.“


    Please note: I have done my best to answer all your questions and to correct your German (and English) sentences. But, understandably, I cannot guarantee for the correctness of everything I have written. I am neither a translator or a grammar specialist, nor an ENS.

    #30Author karla13 (1364913) 16 Sep 22, 23:17
    Comment

    #30 karla: Please note: I have done my best to answer all your questions and to correct your German (and English) sentences. But, understandably, I cannot guarantee for the correctness of everything I have written. I am neither a translator or a grammar specialist, nor an ENS.


    I appreciate very much you have been providing your full help to me, karla. I myself make mistakes or can't answer the question sometimes when helping those who are learning Chinese. I just hope it won't cost you too much time and energy or cause you any inconvenience.


    Again, thank you very much.


    #28 Me:

    6. Auf dem Tisch sind liegen wenige gute Bücher.

    (There are few some/ a few good books on the table.)

    (There are not many good books on the table.)

    (On the table are few some/ a few good books.)


    To correct my own English:

    1. I think "few" might be a wrong translation now after understanding "wenig" better. "Few" implies the connotation of "negation" but "wenig" seems not to.

    2. AFAIK, the sentence construction "On the table are books" is as grammatical in English as "there are books on the table".



    #31Author azhong (1362382)  17 Sep 22, 04:16
    Comment

    @azhong hat mir eine PM geschrieben mit einer Rückfrage zu meiner #30. Ich kann die Frage leider nicht beantworten und stelle sie daher mit seinem Einverständnis ins Forum.

    Bestimmt kann jemand eine fundierte Antwort geben:



    Re#30

    A: This only applies to the adverb „wenig“ (sentences 4 and 5). As an adjective, it changes its endings (like in 6, 7).

    4. In der Tasse ist wenig schwarzer Kaffee.

    (There is little black coffee in the cup.)

    5. Es gibt in der Tasse wenig schwarzen Kaffee.  This sentence is grammatically correct but not idiomatic.

    (There is little black coffee in the cup.)


    Let's put aside the relationship among "wenig", "ein wenig", "little" and "a little" for now. In this PM I just want to say, if My English grammar is correct and if German Grammar is the same as the English one, I think "wenig" in 4 and 5 is also an adjective, not an adverb. (Again, I am feedbacking this because I appreciate your help very much.)


    wenig Kaffee. (Adj +Noun)

    wenig schwarzer Kaffee (Adj + "schwarzer Kaffee")

    "wenig" talks about the amount of "Kaffee"; it's an adj here.

    It would be an adverb here only if it talks about the degree of "schwarz".



    Edit:

    In der Zwischenzeit habe ich selbst die Antwort gefunden und zwar natürlich bei LEO Deutsche Grammatik: Wort - Adjektiv - Zahlen - Unbestimmt:

    Bei 'wenig' handelt es sich – und ich hoffe, das stimmt jetzt alles so – um ein unflektiertes, unbestimmtes Zahladjektiv: Zu den unbestimmten oder indefiniten Zahladjektiven gehören Wörter, die eine unbestimmte Menge bzw. ein unbestimmtes Maß angeben.


    @azhong, you were right. 'wenig' is an adjective here and not an adverb. Sorry for the confusion.

    #32Author karla13 (1364913)  17 Sep 22, 15:14
    Comment

    Re #31:


    #28 Me:

    6. Auf dem Tisch sind liegen wenige gute Bücher.

    (There are few some/ a few good books on the table.)

    (There are not many good books on the table.)

    (On the table are few some/ a few good books.)


    --> IMO, when translating 'wenige“ with 'some' or 'a few' you change the meaning of the sentence.

    These two English words mean 'einige' in German. And using 'not many' also slightly changes the meaning from 'wenige' to 'not viele'. This might make a difference in some contexts.


    2. AFAIK, the sentence construction "On the table are books" is as grammatical in English as "there are books on the table".

    I am not an ENS, but for my German ears „there are books on the table" sounds more idiomatic.



    FYI: Ich habe in einem anderen Faden eine Übersetzungsfrage, die sich aus diesem Faden hier ergeben hat, gestellt. Vielleicht möchte ja dort noch jemand beitragen.

    #33Author karla13 (1364913) 17 Sep 22, 19:13
    Comment

    Ich habe derzeit leider sehr wenig Zeit zum Recherchieren, deshalb in aller Schnelle nur ein paar Anmerkungen:


    Wenig (ebenso wie viel) gehört zu den Wörtern, die sich einer eindeutigen Klassifizierung entziehen. Das Wort hat Eigenschaften, die zu verschiedenen Wortarten passen, aber zu keiner ganz. Deshalb schreibt die Duden-Grammatik: "Bei viel und wenig handelt es sich um einen Grenzfall von Adjektiv und Artikelwort." (9. Aufl., S. 327) DWDS stuft wenig als Adjektiv ein, das auch wie ein Indefinitpronomen verwendet werden kann, und der Online-Duden unterscheidet zwischen dem Adverb (eine wenig ergiebige Quelle) und dem Pronomen und Zahlwort wenig (wenig Glück haben). Wenig kann wie ein Adjektiv flektiert werden (das wenige Geld), aber auch – wie ein Adverb bzw. ein adverbial gebrauchtes Adjektiv und manche Artikelwörter – endungslos vor einem Nomen (mit und ohne Adjektiv) stehen (Ich trinke nur wenig Alkohol; es gab nur wenig/wenige echte Sehenswürdigkeiten; wir konnten nur wenig/weniges retten.).


    Kurz: eine harte Nuss für Grammatiker und eine Frustrationsquelle für Deutschlerner!

    #34Author Cro-Mignon (751134)  17 Sep 22, 21:45
    Comment

    002 (Corrected)


    1. Es gibt auf meinem Bankkonto nur noch wenig Geld.

    (There is little money left in my bank account.)

    - nur noch wenig: [only still little; only little of something still left] only little left


    2. Auf meinem Bankkonto gibt es noch ein wenig Geld. Ich kann dir ein bisschen leihen, wenn du es brauchst.

    (There is still some money in my bank account. I can lend you some if you need it.)


    3. Außerdem habe ich gerade ein paar Brötchen gebacken. Ich kann auch dir zwei geben. Ich weiß, dass zwei nicht viele sind, heute habe ich nur wenige gebacken.

    (Also, I've just baked some rolls. I can also give you two. I know two aren't many; I have baked only a few today.)


    4. Ich kann dir mehr geben, wenn du in zwei Tagen wiederkommst.

    (I can give you more if you come again two days later.)


    1.1 Könntest du mir bitte ein wenig/ ein bisschen Essen geben?

    (Could you please give me a little/some* food?

    * "a little" is more humble and polite than "some".


    1.2 Könntest du mir bitte (nur) wenig Essen geben?

    (Could you please give me just a little bit of food (because of I am on a diet)?


    2.1 Es tut mir leid. Ich habe auch nur wenig Essen.

    (Sorry. I have little food, too.

    2.2 Ich habe auch nur noch wenig Essen.

    (I have little food left, too.


    3 In der Tasse ist ein wenig schwarzer Kaffee.

    3.1 Es gibt in der Tasse ein wenig schwarzen Kaffee.*

    (There is a little black coffee in the cup.)

    * Grammatical but unnatural.


    4. Auf dem Tisch liegen wenige gute Bücher.

    (There are a few good books on the table.


    5. A: „Hast du Kaffee?“

    B: „Ja, ich habe noch ein bisschen/ etwas/ welche.“

    (Do you have coffee?

    (Yes, I still have some.)


    #35Author azhong (1362382) 19 Sep 22, 09:54
    Comment

    Re #35 @azhong


    Nearly perfect! Congratulations!

    My minor suggestions:


    3. Ich kann auch dir zwei geben. Better: Ich kann dir auch zwei geben.

    → word order.

    With „auch dir“ you put the stress on the word „dir“, implying that you also gave 2 (or some) rolls to somebody else (a third person). The usual word order in the second sentence means: „I have baked some rolls, and if you feel like it, I can give you 2 of them“ (only 2 people involved).


    1.1 * "a little" is more humble and polite than "some".

    I am not so sure about that. You should check with an ENS.


    1.2 (Could you please give me just a little bit of food (because of I am on a diet)?

    (no 'of' after because in this case, IMO)


    5. B: „Ja, ich habe noch ein bisschen/ etwas/ welcheN.“

    You have to add an n to 'welche“ as it is in the accusative.

    (etwas haben → wen oder was haben?)


    As you already know, I can give no guarantee for the English sentences. 😉

    #36Author karla13 (1364913)  19 Sep 22, 18:45
    Comment

    Kurz: eine harte Nuss für Grammatiker und eine Frustrationsquelle für Deutschlerner!


    Das Gleiche trifft auf "(a) little" zu, deshalb ist es fast unmöglich, die Posts sinnvoll zu beantworten, weil sie viel zu lang sind. 22 Beispielsätze sind einfach zu viel, um sie im Detail zu erklären.

    #37Author Gibson (418762) 19 Sep 22, 19:29
    Comment

    #37 Gibson: ...deshalb ist es fast unmöglich, die Posts sinnvoll zu beantworten, weil sie viel zu lang sind. 22 Beispielsätze sind einfach zu viel, um sie im Detail zu erklären.


    Come on, Gibson, du hast doch gewusst, wie die Geschichte passiert ist.

    #38Author azhong (1362382) 20 Sep 22, 05:01
    Comment

    003 (Uncorrected) 

    Vielen Dank im Voraus für eure Hilfe.


    1.1▸Meine Mutter hat sechs Kinder geboren. Das heißt, ich habe drei Schwestern und zwei Brüder. 

    (My mother has given birth to six children .That is, I have three sisters and two brothers.)

    - jmdn. gebären: give birth to sb | gebar, geboren | 


    2▸Beide Schwestern sind Lehrerinen, die Dritte ist Künstlerin.

    (Two sisters are teachers, the third is an artist.


    3▸Die beide Brüder sind Ingenieure. 

    (Both brothers are engineers.)


    4▸(Das ist aber mir im Lieben nicht richtig. Ich möchte nur die Wörter "beide" und "die beide" üben.)

    (It's, however, not true in my real life. I just wanted to practice the words "beide" and "die beide".)


    - This is what I was told: I should use "beide" if it's two of more than two, and use "die beide" if it's two of two in total.)

    #39Author azhong (1362382) 20 Sep 22, 05:09
    Comment

    3▸Die beide Brüder sind Ingenieure.

       Die beide n  Brüder sind Ingenieure.

       Beide Brüder sind Ingenieure.

    #40Author manni3 (305129)  20 Sep 22, 10:03
    Comment

    Come on, Gibson, du hast doch gewusst, wie die Geschichte passiert ist.


    I don't, actually - I don't follow and remember your threads in that much detail. But it doesn't matter anyway. It's too much to try and explain because every usage of (a) little needs its own explanation. If you want useful answers, you need to structure your queries better. (And in my case, I'm also simply not prepared to spend 20 minutes answering a post.

    #41Author Gibson (418762) 20 Sep 22, 10:27
    Comment

    Re #39


    003 (corrected) 


    1.1▸Meine Mutter hat sechs Kinder geboren. Das heißt, ich habe drei Schwestern und zwei Brüder. 

    (My mother has given birth to six children.That is means, I have three sisters and two brothers.)


    → Both sentences are correct. As an alternative, you could omit the „geboren“ because it stresses the fact that your mother gave birth to six children. The English equivalent to the German sentence „Meine Mutter hat sechs Kinder.“ would be „My mother has got six children.“.


    2▸Beide Schwestern sind LehrerinNen, die Ddritte ist Künstlerin.

    (Two Both sisters are teachers, the third one is an artist.)


    → You forgot a second n in 'Lehrerinnen'. 'dritte' must be written in small caps because it directly refers to 'Schwestern'. I would suggest to add 'zwei meiner' to your sentence; that sounds more personal. (But then, of course, you wouldn't practise 'beide'.)


    Zwei meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen, die dritte ist Künstlerin.

    (Two of my sisters are teachers, the third one is an artist.)


    3▸Die beide Brüder sind Ingenieure. 

    (Both brothers are engineers.)


    → I confirm both of manni3's suggestions in #40.


    Another possibility would be

    Meine beiden Brüder sind Ingenieure.“

    (Both of my brothers are engineers.)


    4▸(Das ist aber mir im Lieben nicht richtig. Ich möchte nur die Wörter "beide" und "die beideN" üben.)

    (It's, however, not true in my real life. I just wanted to practice the words "beide" and "die beideN".)


    → Your first sentence is grammatically wrong and not idiomatic. There are several possibilities to phrase your sentence idiomatically. I have written down one of the possibilities and its translation into English.

    Your second sentence needs an n with 'die beiden'.

    'die Lieben' in your first sentence means 'the loved ones'. The word you are looking for is 'das Leben'.


    → 4▸Das ist aber in meinem wirklichen Leben nicht so. Ich möchte nur die Wörter "beide" und "die beiden" üben.)

    (But that is not the case in my real life.)


    - This is what I was told: I should use "beide" if it's two of more than two, and use "die beiden" if it's two of two in total.)

    I am afraid I don't fully understand what you intend to say. Could you rephrase that, please?


    My examples:

    Beide Frauen sind freundlich. (Both women are friendly.)

    In total, there are only two women.


    Die beiden Frauen sind freundlich. (Both of the women are friendly.)

    The number of women in total is undetermined. There could be just two, or also a greater number.

    #42Author karla13 (1364913)  20 Sep 22, 22:21
    Comment

    That is means, I have three sisters and two brothers.)

    No comma.


    (Two Both sisters are teachers, the third one is an artist.)

    I don't know why you changed "two" to "both". "two" is correct; "both" doesn't really work.


    Die beiden Frauen sind freundlich. (Both of the women are friendly.)

     The number of women in total is undetermined. There could be just two, or also a greater number.

    I don't understand what you mean. "Both of the women" means exactly 2.


    (I'm not clear on who said what, i.e. what's the question and what's the answer/explanation. Like I said: too much in one comment.)

    #43Author Gibson (418762) 20 Sep 22, 23:39
    Comment

    Re #43


    Two Both sisters are teachers, the third one is an artist.)

    I don't know why you changed "two" to "both". "two" is correct; "both" doesn't really work.


    I changed it because the German sentence starts with "Beide Schwestern" and not with "Zwei Schwestern".

    But if 'both' doesn't work here... I am not an ENS [disclaimer].


    Alles Weitere morgen. Muss jetzt meine Netflix-Serie weiterglotzen...


    Halt – hierzu muss ich noch schnell widersprechen: Like I said: too much in one comment.

    Nee nee nee, alles sehr schön übersichtlich hier! 🙃

    #44Author karla13 (1364913)  21 Sep 22, 00:09
    Comment

    #42 Karla:

    "(Two Both sisters are teachers, the third one is an artist.)"

    #43 Gibson:

    "I don't know why you changed "two" to "both". "two" is correct; "both" doesn't really work."


    My comment 1: I agree with Gibson. In English "both" refers to "two" when there are only two in total. E.g.:

    Both Mike and Jim have red hair.

    Mike and Jim both have red hair.

    ▸I loved them both.

    ▸I loved both of them.

    ▸Would you like milk or sugar or both?

    ▸I failed my driving test because I didn't keep both hands on the steering wheel.

    In my sentence you should use "two", not "both", because there're three sisters in total.


    My comment 2: (FYI) I'm unsure if the "one" in "the third one" can be omitted so I've asked a question here.

    #45Author azhong (1362382)  21 Sep 22, 06:31
    Comment

    Q: Are "zwei" and "beide(n)" always changeable in German? z.B.:


    1.1 Ich habe zwei Brüder.

    1.2 Ich habe beide Brüder.

    2.1 Die zwei Personen sind meine Familie.

    2.2 Die beiden Personen sind meine Familie.

    3.1 Ich brauche zwei Eimer.

    3.2 Ich brauche beide Eimer.

    4.1 Zwei meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen, die dritte ist Künstlerin.

    4.2 Beide meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen, die dritte ist Künstlerin.


    (If the answer is yes, then it's not the case between "two" and "both" in English. "Two" and "both" are nor changeable.

    #46Author azhong (1362382)  21 Sep 22, 06:49
    Comment

    #42 Karla:

    ▸... die Dritte dritten ist Künstlerin'dritte' must be written in small caps because it directly refers to 'Schwestern'.


    My Q: Indeed, I've been confused for a period whether or not I should capitalize (Large caps) an adjective when the modified noun is omitted.

    So, I should NOT capitalize it if the omitted object is very clear mentioned in the text already? z.B.:

    A: Welches Buch magst du?

    B: Ich mag das rote.

     
    And I SHOULD capitalize it if the omitted noun is unclear yet? z.B.:

    Ich mag etwas Interessantes.

    #47Author azhong (1362382) 21 Sep 22, 07:18
    Comment

    #42 Karla:

    "▸Beide Frauen sind freundlich.

    → In total, there are only two women.

    ▸Die beiden Frauen sind freundlich.

    → The number of women in total is undetermined. There could be just two, or also a greater number."


    My Q's: 

    Q1) I am confused. According to the rule, it seems wrong to say

    ?Beide Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen.

    ?(Both of the sisters are teachers.)

    because I have three sisters. Am I right?


    Q2) Furthermore, If I say

    Die beiden Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen,... 

    Seemingly, it make sense to me only if the listener knows already which two sisters I'm talking about. Am I right?


    (One correct expression is, as you have suggested,

    Zwei meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen...

    (Two of my sisters...)


    Q3) How about if I say

    ?Meine beiden Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen.

    What does it mean? Does it mean

    ?(Two of my sisters ... (and I still have some other sisters)

    or

    ?(Both [of] my sisters...(and I have no more sisters)


    Q4) And how about if I say

    ?Beide meiner Schwester sind Lehrerinnen.

    What does it mean? Or does it just ungrammatical? 


    Thank you.

    #48Author azhong (1362382)  21 Sep 22, 07:36
    Comment

    Re #45 @azhong


    >> In my sentence you should use "two", not "both", because there're three sisters in total.

    You (and Gibson in #43) are absolutely right. 'both' doesn't fit here. Sorry for the confusion.


    >> My comment 2: (FYI) I'm unsure if the "one" in "the third one" can be omitted so I've asked a question here.

    Thanks for the link. The answers there are very instructive for me.



    Re #47 @azhong


    My Q: Indeed, I've been confused for a period whether or not I should capitalize (Large caps) an adjective when the modified noun is omitted. [That is even confusing for quite a few German native speakers.]


    A: Both of your following two rules are perfectly correct:

    So, I should NOT capitalize it if the omitted object is very clear mentioned in the text already?

    And I SHOULD capitalize it if the omitted noun is unclear yet?


    (All three examples of yours are correct.)

    #49Author karla13 (1364913)  21 Sep 22, 14:27
    Comment

    Re #46 @azhong


    Q: Are "zwei" and "beide(n)" always changeable in German?

    A: No.


    1.1 Ich habe zwei Brüder.

    Correct.

    1.2 Ich habe beide Brüder.

    Not idiomatic. (Doesn't make any sense.)


    2.1 Die zwei Personen sind meine Familie.

    Not idiomatic. 

    2.1 Die zwei Personen gehören zu meiner Familie.

    (The two persons belong to my family.)


    2.2 Die beiden Personen sind meine Familie.

    Not idiomatic.

    2.2 Die beiden Personen gehören zu meiner Familie.

    (Both persons belong to my family.)


    3.1 Ich brauche zwei Eimer.

    Correct.

    3.2 Ich brauche beide Eimer.

    Correct.


    4.1 Zwei meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen, die dritte ist Künstlerin.

    Correct.


    4.2 Beide meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen, die dritte ist Künstlerin.

    Grammatically correct, but illogical.

    („Beide meiner Schwestern“ means that you only have two.)

    → Zwei meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen, die dritte ist Künstlerin.


    (NB: → = correct(ed) sentence)

    #50Author karla13 (1364913)  21 Sep 22, 17:03
    Comment

    Ich halte "diese zwei/beiden Menschen sind meine Familie" für idiomatisch, wenn das die ganze Familie ist. Geht auch mit sehr engen Freunden, wenn die biologische Familie tot ist oder man sich nicht mit ihr versteht.

    #51Author Gibson (418762) 21 Sep 22, 18:06
    Comment

    Zu #51 @Gibson


    Ja, ich halte deinen Satz "Diese zwei/beiden Menschen sind meine Familie" auch für idiomatisch. Der Ursprungssatz lautet aber "Die zwei/beiden Personen sind meine Familie.". Die zwei unterschiedlichen Wörter sind IMO ausschlaggebend für die Entscheidung, ob die Sätze idiomatisch sind oder nicht.

    #52Author karla13 (1364913)  21 Sep 22, 22:55
    Comment

    Ja, wenn es darum ging, stimme ich dir zu. Du hast in deiner Verbesserung aber auch "→ 2.2 Die beiden Personen gehören zu meiner Familie." geschrieben, da sehe ich wenig Unterschied. Deshalb war mir nicht klar, auf was sich "not idiomatic" bezog.


    (Das ist übrigens genau das, was ich meine - oft gibt es so viele kleine Kommentare (die auch nicht direkt zur eigentlichen Frage gehören), dass die Antworten bei mehr als 3 Beispielsätzen völlig ausufern, wenn man alles kommentiert.)

    #53Author Gibson (418762) 21 Sep 22, 23:16
    Comment

    Re #48 @azhong


    Q1) According to the rule, it seems wrong to say

    ?Beide Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen.

    because I have three sisters. Am I right?

    Yes, you are right. I was wrong (see #49 re 45.)


    Q2) Furthermore, If I say

    Die beiden Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen,... 

    Seemingly, it makes only sense to me if the listener knows already which two sisters I'm talking about. Am I right?

    Yes, you are right.


    Q3) How about if I say

    ?Meine beiden Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen.

    What does it mean? Does it mean

    ?(Two of my sisters ... (and I still have some other sisters) No.

    or

    ?(Both [of] my sisters...(and I have no more sisters) Yes.


    Q4) And how about if I say

    ?Beide meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen.

    What does it mean? Or is it just ungrammatical? 

    Nearly correct (n missing). Perfectly idiomatic. It means: I have got 2 sisters and both of them are teachers.


    Re my explanation in #42 (see below): I will try to explain this again tomorrow. Obviously, it wasn't phrased very clearly because Gibson (#43) also didn't understand what I tried to express.

    "▸Beide Frauen sind freundlich.

    → In total, there are only two women.

    Die beiden Frauen sind freundlich.

    → The number of women in total is undetermined. There could be just two, or also a greater number."



    (NB: My answers, remarks or explanations are in bold.)

    #54Author karla13 (1364913)  21 Sep 22, 23:50
    Comment

    Zu #53 @Gibson


    (Das ist übrigens genau das, was ich meine - oft gibt es so viele kleine Kommentare (die auch nicht direkt zur eigentlichen Frage gehören), dass die Antworten bei mehr als 3 Beispielsätzen völlig ausufern, wenn man alles kommentiert.)


    (Ich verstehe, was du meinst. Ich gebe mir auch große Mühe, dass nichts zu sehr ausufert (dazu neige ich nämlich gar nicht, HAHAHA). Bisher hatte ich jedenfalls das Gefühl, dass @azhong mit meinem Korrekturstil ganz gut zurechtkommt, und ihn eher etwas mehr als zu wenige Informationen interessieren.)

    #55Author karla13 (1364913)  22 Sep 22, 00:05
    Comment

    ?Beide meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen.

    What does it mean? Or is it just ungrammatical? 

    Nearly correct (n missing). Perfectly idiomatic.

    (#54)


    Wirklich? Für mein Sprachgefühl müsste es eher heißen


    beide meine Schwestern (analog zu alle meine Schwestern)


    oder besser: meine beiden Schwestern.

    #56Author Cro-Mignon (751134)  22 Sep 22, 00:18
    Comment

    Zu #56 @Cro-Mignon


    Danke, dass du hier immer wieder mal mit kritischem Blick auf diesen Faden schaust.


    Wirklich? Für mein Sprachgefühl müsste es eher heißen

    beide meine Schwestern (analog zu alle meine Schwestern)


    Ich habe eben mein Sprachgefühl noch mal befragt, und es hält sowohl deinen als auch meinen Satz für korrekt. Mein Berliner Mund benutzt aktiv allerdings nur meine Variante. Vielleicht zu Unrecht, ich weiß es nicht. Wir finden es bestimmt gemeinsam heraus. 😉

    Was meinst du, Gibson?


    oder besser: meine beiden Schwestern.

    Das hatten wir bereits in #48.

    #57Author karla13 (1364913) 22 Sep 22, 00:38
    Comment

    #57 "Danke, dass du hier immer wieder mal mit kritischem Blick auf diesen Faden schaust."


    Me: Von mir sollen die Wörter gesagt werden. :)

    Ich danke jedem, der manchmal diesen Faden liest und mir seine oder ihr Hilfe gibt.



    #58Author azhong (1362382) 22 Sep 22, 04:24
    Comment

     #50 Karla: Die zwei Personen gehören zu meiner Familie.

    "The two persons* belong to my family."


    Me: [*] This is what I was told by an USAmerican: "The usual plural of 'person' is 'people'. 'Persons' is administrative jargon, e.g.

    'Report suspicious persons and vehicles to local law enforcement officials.' "


    According to the "administrative jargon:, I think "persons" is improper here.

     

    #59Author azhong (1362382)  22 Sep 22, 04:55
    Comment

    #39 Me: 2▸Zwei meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinen, die dritte ist Künstlerin.

    (Two of my sisters are teachers , the third is an artist.


    Me again: I'd like to correct my own English punctuation. Unlike in German, it's an ungrammatical run-on sentences in English with a comma. The correct expressions in English should be,


    1 ... are teachers, and the other's an artist.

    or

    2. ... are teachers; the other's an artist.


    ("The third" is also grammatical, but "the other" is more natural.)

    #60Author azhong (1362382)  22 Sep 22, 05:12
    Comment

    ★003 (Corrected)


    1 Zwei der meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen, die andere ist Künstler. 

    2 Meine beiden Brüder sind Ingenieure. Beide meine/meiner Brüder sind Ingenieure.

    3 (Das ist aber im meinem wirklichen Leben nicht so.)

    #61Author azhong (1362382)  22 Sep 22, 06:04
    Comment

    004 Mehr Übungen zur "both" (uncorrected)

    Einen schönen Tag wünsche ich euch.


    1▸Sowohl Mike als auch Jim haben rote Harre. 

    (Both Mike and Jim have red hair.

    - das Haar: a single stread of hair ->die Harre

    2▸Mike und Jim haben beide rote Harre.

    (Mike and Jim both have red hair.

    3▸Alle beide haben rote Harre.

    (Both of them have red hair.)

    4▸Sie beide haben rote Harre.

    (They both have red hair.

    #62Author azhong (1362382) 22 Sep 22, 06:12
    Comment
    Deine Sätze sind alle korrekt, ABER: Haare, nicht Harre.
    Das Haar - die Haare
    #63Author fehlerTeufel (1317098) 22 Sep 22, 09:44
    Comment

    Re #61


    Pls note your 3 mistakes in bold:


    1 Zwei der meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen, die andere* ist Künstlerin.

    2 Meine beiden Brüder sind Ingenieure. Beide meine/meiner Brüder sind Ingenieure.

    3 (Das ist aber in meinem wirklichen Leben nicht so.)


    *Unlike to English (see your #60), in German "die driite" IMO sounds more natural than "die andere".

    #64Author karla13 (1364913)  22 Sep 22, 09:59
    Comment

    #63 @fehlerTeufel


    Hast du eine Meinung zu

    a) Beide meine Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen.

    oder

    b) Beide meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen.


    ? Oder gar richtige Ahnung?

    #65Author karla13 (1364913)  22 Sep 22, 10:14
    Comment

    Ah, entschuldigt, ich hatte ausschließlich #62 wahrgenommen, und meine Aussage, dass alle Sätze korrekt sind, bezog sich nur darauf.


    #65:

    "Beide meine Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen" ist m. E. falsch. Es heißt entweder: "Meine beiden Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen" oder "Meine zwei Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen". In beiden Fällen wird ausgedrückt, dass es nur zwei Schwestern gibt. Ansonsten hieße es: "Zwei meiner Schwestern ..."

    "Beide meiner Schwestern sind Lehrerinnen" ist korrekt, wenn man die Betonung auf "beide" legen will. (Aussage: Nicht nur eine meiner Schwestern, sondern (sogar!) beide ...) Auch hier gibt es nur diese beiden/diese zwei Schwestern.

    #66Author fehlerTeufel (1317098)  22 Sep 22, 11:43
    Comment

    Zu #66 @fehlerTeufel


    Ja, "unser" kleiner Faden kann auf nicht-Eingeweihte schon recht unübersichtlich wirken – ist es aber natürlich nicht... 😉


    Danke für deine Einschätzung zu meine/ meiner. Ich teile deine Meinung. Jetzt schaue ich mal in die LEO-Grammatik, ob ich was Definitives dazu finde.

    #67Author karla13 (1364913)  22 Sep 22, 12:11
    Comment

    005 Zwei Sätze, mit eine Frage zum "beides"


    1▸Ich liebe Mike und Jim. Ich liebe sie beide./ Ich liebe alle beide.

    (I loved Mike and Jim. I love them both.

    2▸Möchten Sie Milch or Zucker oder beides?

    (Would you like milk.F or sugar.M or both?


    Q: Warum geht es hier "beides" (according to Google Translate), nicht "beide" oder "Beides" oder was Anderes?

    • was Anderes: something else

    Oder möchten Sie sie beide?

    Oder möchten Sie alle beide?

    Oder möchten Sie sowohl Milch als auch Zucker?


    Vielen Dank. Wieder, einen schönen Tag wünsche ich euch.

    #68Author azhong (1362382)  22 Sep 22, 15:13
    Comment

    Re #68


    005 Zwei Sätze mit einer Frage zum "beides"


    1▸Ich liebe Mike und Jim. Ich liebe sie beide./ Ich liebe alle beide. Correct.

    (I loved Mike and Jim. I love them both.

    2▸Möchten Sie Milch, or Zucker oder beides? (I would omit the second 'oder/ or and add a comma)

    (Would you like milk, or sugar or both?


    Q: Warum* geht heißt es hier "beides" (according to Google Translate), nicht "beide" oder "Beides" oder etwas Anderes?

    • etwas Anderes: something else

    Oder möchten Sie sie beides?

    Oder möchten Sie alles beides?

    Oder möchten Sie sowohl Milch als auch Zucker? Correct.


    (* I can't explain why, sorry.)


    Vielen Dank, ich wünsche euch wieder einen schönen Tag. (word order)


    (my corrections in bold)

    #69Author karla13 (1364913) 22 Sep 22, 20:53
    Comment

    Zwei Fragen, bitte. Einen schönen Tag wünsche ich euch.


    Ich habe das Wörterbuch Duden nachgeschlagen. Das Ausdruck "sowohl A als auch B" kann auch "sowohl A als B" oder "sowohl A wie B" gesagt werden.


    Q1) Wenn man "nicht nur A, sondern auch B" sagt, glaube ich, der Ausdruck betont B. Habe ich Recht?

    Q2) Wie, wenn man "sowohl A als B" sagt? Ich meine, A wird hier betont? 


    #70Author azhong (1362382) 23 Sep 22, 04:57
    Comment

    #42 Karla: "(My mother has given birth to six children. That  is  means, I have three sisters and two brothers.)


    Me: I've received a late comment here and just FYI. (Actually I myself wasn't unsure the differences between them.) In short: "Is" works better than "means" here.

    #71Author azhong (1362382) 23 Sep 22, 05:56
    Comment

    Three sisters and two brothers make six siblings? I don't think that's right in any language ;-)


    (I agree with your other source that "that means" doesn't work here.)

    #72Author Gibson (418762) 23 Sep 22, 13:45
    Comment

    I have: 1+3+2 ≠ 6 😉

    #73Author manni3 (305129)  23 Sep 22, 13:53
    Comment

    Oh. Ah. Ich sag ja immer: ich und Zahlen... 😬

    #74Author Gibson (418762)  23 Sep 22, 14:08
    Comment

    Kopf ist notwendige Bedingung für Kopfrechnen 😏


    @ ich und zahlen - In Deinem Stammlokal kennen sie Dich ja mittlerweile 🥴

    #75Author manni3 (305129)  23 Sep 22, 14:29
    Comment

    Re #70


    Ich habe im Wörterbuch 'Der Duden' nachgeschlagen. Der Ausdruck "sowohl A als auch B" kann auch "sowohl A als B" oder "sowohl A wie B" formuliert werden.


    Q1) Wenn man "nicht nur A, sondern auch B" sagt, wird, glaube ich, der Ausdruck B betont. Habe ich Recht?

    A1) Frankly, i can't answer your question. "nicht nur, sondern auch" is similar to "und". None of the two expressions is emphasized, though, IMO. It is more like an addition.


    Q2) Wie ist es, wenn man "sowohl A als B" sagt? Ich glaube, A wird hier betont?

    A2) No, that's definitely not the case. A has the same emphasis as B.


    Examples:

    1) Er ist nicht nur groß, sondern auch stark. = Er ist groß und stark.

    2) Ich habe nicht nur Schwestern, sondern auch Brüder. = Ich habe Schwestern und Brüder.

    3) Ich habe nicht nur Hunger, sondern auch Durst. = Ich habe Hunger und Durst.


    4) Sowohl Karla als (auch) Zhong lernen Englisch. 😀

    5) Ich mag sowohl Hunde wie (auch) Katzen. = Ich mag Hunde und Katzen.

    6) Die Frau kauft sowohl Reis wie (auch) Kartoffeln. = Die Frau kauft Reis und Kartoffeln.

    → I would suggest not to omit the 'auch; it sounds better with 'auch', IMO.


    (My corrections and remarks in bold.)

    #76Author karla13 (1364913)  23 Sep 22, 20:22
    Comment

    #76 Karla: (My corrections and remarks in bold.)


    Me: It's a good arrangement for me, which I thank you for. Furthermore, any different layout design is okay for me, I'll say. As a learner it's my responsibility to understand the responses of you all even they are in an unclear layout design, and also my responsibility to ask actively if I find anything bewildering*.


    [*] "Bewildering" is a new word for me; I've just learned it from one of your posts. Another one is "condescend". German is still a language that bewilders me very much. Would you keep condescending to help my German?

    #77Author azhong (1362382) 24 Sep 22, 03:56
    Comment

    In #42, I tried to explain the difference between 'beide' and 'die beiden' but obviously wasn't very clear in my explanation, so I will try again.


    1) Beide Frauen sind freundlich. (Both women are friendly.)

    → In total, there are only two women. Both of them are friendly.


    2) Die beiden Frauen sind freundlich. (Both of the women are friendly.)

    → This phrasing can have two meanings:

    a) In total, there are only two women. (Like 1))

    b) There is a greater number of people and amongst them are two which you are talking about. (These two women.)


    Example: There is a group of 10 women. You are pointing to woman#3 (Gibson) and woman#6 (karla13) saying: Die beiden Frauen (Gibson und karla13) sind freundlich. Die anderen acht Frauen sind unfreundlich.


    In this case, you put the emphasis on the word „die“.



    Re #77

    [*] German is still a language that bewilders me very much. Would you keep condescending to help my German?


    I don't think you used the words 'to bewilder' and 'condescending' properly here. I think „to confuse“ would be more fitting (German is still very confusing for me.)


    „Condescending“ has a negative meaning: Not treating somebody as an equal but as if you knew more/ better than the other person. So in your sentence, „condescending“ doesn't make any sense to me. What did you intend to express? Maybe: Will you keep on helping me with my German?

    #78Author karla13 (1364913) 24 Sep 22, 16:42
    Comment

    #68 Me: 2▸Möchten Sie Milch or Zucker oder beides?

    (Would you like milk.F or sugar.M or both?

    Q: Warum geht es hier "beides", nicht "beide" oder "Beides" oder was Anderes?


    Update: Just FYI: Ich habe später hier die gleiche Frage gefragt. In short:

    beides: a pronoun, singular, quality-related.

    beide: an attributive adjective, plural, quantity-related.


    z.B.

    ▸A: Magst du Äpfel oder Bananen? 

    B: Beides mag mir. (Quality-related)


    ▸A: Magst du einen Äpfel oder eine Bananen? 

    B: Beide mögen mir.(Quantity-related.)

    #79Author azhong (1362382)  25 Sep 22, 05:17
    Comment

    #78 Karla:

    (#77 Me: German is still a language that bewilders me very much. Would you keep condescending to help my German?)

    I don't think you used the words 'to bewilder' and 'condescending' properly here. I think „to confuse“ would be more fitting (German is still very confusing for me.)

    „Condescending“ has a negative meaning: 


    Me: I found this page talking about "confuse", "bewilder" and "baffle". I don't understand them all yet, but I also agree "confuse" works here.

    As for "condescend to do something", I am using it in a humourous way according to this dictionary page.

    #80Author azhong (1362382) 25 Sep 22, 05:35
    Comment

    006 (Uncorrected)

    Einen schönen Tag wünsche ich euch.


    ▸1 Mimì und Rodolfo waren ein junges Paar, nur noch für weniger als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet. 

    (Mimì and Rodolfo were a young couple; they had been married only for less than one year.


    ▸2 Sie waren nicht reich, wobei alle beide arbeiteten. 

    (They were not rich, although they both worked.


    ▸3 Immer wenn das Monatsende kam, hatten sie auf ihren Bankkonten nur noch wenig Geld. 

    (Whenever the end of a month came, they had little money left in their bank accounts.

    #81Author azhong (1362382) 25 Sep 22, 06:03
    Comment

    Re #79


    You:

    beides: a pronoun, singular, quality-related.

    beide: an attributive adjective, plural, quantity-related.


    → I do not consent with "quality-related" re beides. IMO, it is also quantity-related.


    It is interesting to read the discussion in the other forum though I find some of the answers/ statements confusing. To tell you the thruth, I personally woudn't believe everything that an "advanced non-native speaker of German" (AE and Palestinian Arabic bilingual) told me.


    Both of your following examples are unfortunately wrong:


    ▸A: Magst du Äpfel oder Bananen? 

    B: Beides mag mir ich. Or, much more idiomatic: Ich mag beides.


    ▸A: Magst du einen Apfel oder eine Bananen (haben)

    B: Beide mögen mir. Ich mag beide haben.

    Or better: Ich möchte beide (haben). Or, shorter and more idiomatic: Beide.

    #82Author karla13 (1364913)  25 Sep 22, 19:55
    Comment

    Magst du einen Apfel oder einen Banane haben? (Would you like an apple or a banana?)


    "Magst du einen Apfel oder eine Banana" ist eher sinnfrei IMO. (Es gibt dieser Verkürzung bei Kinder, es ist aber kein korrekter deutscher Satz.


    Die Sätze in #79 sind beide falsch, wie Karla schon sagt.


    Satz #1 und #2 in #81 sind auch falsch. Willst du nicht erst mal versuchen, die schon genannten Beispiele zu verstehen, bevor du neue bringst? Wäre das nicht sinnvoller?


    Edit: Karla hat editiert. Das "haben" stand da gerade noch nicht.

    #83Author Gibson (418762)  25 Sep 22, 20:09
    Comment

    Zu #83 @ Gibson


    Richtig, ich habe mehrmals editiert, nachdem ich bemerkt hatte, dass meine Antwort unvollständig war.


    Edit1:

    So müsste es nun korrekt sein:


    ▸A: Magst du einen Apfel oder eine Bananen haben

    B: Beide mögen mir. Ich mag beide haben.

    Or better: Ich möchte beide haben. Or, shorter and more idiomatic: Beide.


    Edit2:

    "Magst du einen Apfel oder eine Banana" ist eher sinnfrei IMO. (Es gibt dieser Verkürzung bei Kinder, es ist aber kein korrekter deutscher Satz.


    Ich benutze das umgangssprachlich häufig. Zu meinem Kollegen sage ich bspw.: "Willst/ magst du (eine)n Pfirsich oder (ei)ne Nektarine?" Er hat sich noch nie beschwert, dass er mich nicht versteht 😉.


    #84Author karla13 (1364913)  25 Sep 22, 20:21
    Comment

    'korrekt' hat ja mit 'verstehen' auch nur marginal zu tun ;-)


    [Wobei mir "willst" viel weniger auffällt als "magst". Liegt vielleicht einfach daran, dass ich "magst" viel weniger benutze. "Willst du xxx?" sage ich auch dauernd.)

    #85Author Gibson (418762)  25 Sep 22, 20:42
    Comment

    Zu #85

    [Wobei mir "willst" viel weniger auffällt als "magst". Liegt vielleicht einfach daran, dass ich "magst" viel weniger benutze. "Willst du xxx?" sage ich auch dauernd.)


    Zustimmung.

    Da ich 'magst' für auch nicht so verbreitet halte, habe ich deshalb ja 'möchtest' als bessere Variante vorgeschlagen. Für einen A1-Deutschlernenden mit noch wenig Sprachgefühl erschien mir 'willst' zu "gefährlich".


    'korrekt' hat ja mit 'verstehen' auch nur marginal zu tun ;-)


    Das stimmt ;-). In der Umgangssprache gibt es halt einiges, was kein korrektes Deutsch ist, und wir Muttersprachler verstehen es trotzdem ohne Probleme.

    #86Author karla13 (1364913) 25 Sep 22, 21:09
    Comment

    Re #80


    As for "condescend to do something", I am using it in a humourous way according to this dictionary page.

    Definition:

    If you condescend to do something, you agree to do something that you do not consider to be good enough for your social position.


    I see. Now I understand what you meant. Nevertheless, I think that your sentence: "Would you keep condescending to help my German?" is not properly worded. To be sure, you should clear that up with native speakers in your other forum.

    #87Author karla13 (1364913)  25 Sep 22, 21:21
    Comment

    Re #81


    006 (Corrected)


    ▸1 Mimì und Rodolfo waren ein junges Paar, nur noch für sie waren erst weniger als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet. 

    (Mimì and Rodolfo were a young couple; they had been married only for less than one year.


    ▸2 Sie waren nicht reich, wobei obwohl alle/ sie beide arbeiteten. 

    (They were not rich, although they both worked.


    ▸3 Immer wenn das Monatsende kam, hatten sie auf ihren Bankkonten nur noch wenig Geld.  Correct.

    More idiomatic: Zum/ Am Monatsende hatten sie immer nur noch wenig Geld auf ihren Bankkonten.

    (Whenever the end of a month came, they had little money left in their bank accounts.



    Willst du nicht erst mal versuchen, die schon genannten Beispiele zu verstehen, bevor du neue bringst? Wäre das nicht sinnvoller?

    I totally agree with Gibson (#83). Most of your examples are still too difficult for your level of knowledge. Stick to easier constructions, practice your vocabulary, repeat the grammar that you have already learnt. Refrain from getting confused and frustrated.


    But all in all, I must say that your progress is impressive. You are a quick, persistent and diligent learner. Very nicely done! Keep on with your excellent work.

    #88Author karla13 (1364913) 25 Sep 22, 22:48
    Comment

    #83 Gibson: Willst du nicht erst mal versuchen, die schon genannten Beispiele zu verstehen, bevor du neue bringst? Wäre das nicht sinnvoller?


    Me: Wow, I don't know if you implied that meaning but it may sound like a very serious suit, as if I have been considering the comments I've received from you all as the paper bags free given by stores. No, I haven't. I agree, however, that I will also forget as time go by; I think it's unavoidable for every learner.


    Do you still remember, Gibson, this sentence practice of mine in August, which you have also provided your help?

    • This month again I've read a few books, which I'm going to introduce here.

    I have been reviewing it these recent days thinking about the correction for the English part first, and have asked questions here first and here later. you can check the date and know I am not lying.


    Furthermore, some phrases I used in 006 this time are repetitions of those I've learned from 001 to 005. I do review the comments I've received.


    For me, this suit is really serious if you imply that, particularly regarding that I don't pay at all for all the help I've received, so I decide to explain in earnest.

    #89Author azhong (1362382) 26 Sep 22, 04:49
    Comment

    #87 Karla: As for "condescend to do something",

    Nevertheless, I think that your sentence: "Would you keep condescending to help my German?" is not properly worded.


    Me: You are right, according to the first two comments I've already received in this thread. The dictionary page seems wrong.

    #90Author azhong (1362382) 26 Sep 22, 05:07
    Comment

    #88 Karla: Mimì und Rodolfo waren ein junges Paar, nur noch für weniger als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet sie waren verheiratet erst weniger als ein Jahr.


    My Q: Is it possible to tell me a (rough) rule when it's NOT idiomatic to reverse a sentence (by moving the subject backward)? I've received similar corrections for many times here or there, but still I can't get that feeling. But OTOH I do see the word orders are reversed more flexibly in German compared to those in English.

    Or just skip the question for now and I'll keep feeling it. Thank you.

    #91Author azhong (1362382)  26 Sep 22, 05:25
    Comment

    #88 Karla: ...sie waren verheiratet erst weniger als ein Jahr.


    My Q: Is it unnecessary to have a "seit" (for)? Or are both just grammatical?

    ?Sie waren verheiratet erst [seit] weniger als ein Jahr.

    (They ?were/have been? married only [for] less than one year.


    (I felt also unsure about the English sentence, so I've asked a corresponding question here, too. Just FYI.)

     

    #92Author azhong (1362382) 26 Sep 22, 06:07
    Comment

    #89 Me: "suit"


    Language Edit: I think more proper expressions might be "condemnation" or "criticism".

    #93Author azhong (1362382)  26 Sep 22, 06:47
    Comment

    ...sie waren verheiratet erst weniger als ein Jahr.


    That's not what Karla wrote and it's wrong.

    #94Author Gibson (418762) 26 Sep 22, 11:39
    Comment

    Re #90

    Thank you for the link to the discussion in wordreference confirming my language feeling.


    The dictionary page seems wrong.

    You might consider the possibility that the dictionary entry is right whereas your understanding of the word in this context could be wrong. 😉



    Re #89 (addressed to Gibson)

    [...] if you imply that, particularly regarding that I don't pay at all for all the help I've received, [...]

    No implication whatsoever was made anywhere here.



    Re #91

    Like Gibson says in #94.

    #95Author karla13 (1364913) 26 Sep 22, 13:02
    Comment

    Re #92


    There are several possibilities to express that idiomatically:


    1) Sie waren erst weniger als ein Jahr verheiratet.

    2) Sie waren erst seit weniger als einem Jahr verheiratet.

    3) Sie waren noch nicht einmal ein Jahr (lang) verheiratet.

    4) Sie waren kürzer als ein Jahr (lang) verheiratet.


    1) They had only been married (for) less than a year.

    2) They had only been married (for) less than a year.

    3) They had not even been married for a/ one year.

    4) They had been married for less than a/ one year.


    NB: Pls note that I made the translations into English as a non-NES.

    #96Author karla13 (1364913)  26 Sep 22, 13:35
    Comment

    Oh, I didn't see #89 at all (too many postings...) Thanks, Karla.


    azhong, I don't know what you mean by "suit" and I also don't quite understand what you think I'm implying.


    I didn't mean to attack you in any way, I just think that the way you approach this is not particularly effective. If I were you, I'd choose one topic and go through that with a few examples each time so I can make sure I really understand everything about those example sentences. (For example, in the last sentences about "beide" a question about word order came up, which just muddies the water IMO. I personally would profit more if I stuck to a set of examples and varied them rather then coming up with new ones - which then might produce a completely different problem - until everything about this original set of examples is clear and understood.) But I'm not you. I can't and don't want to tell you what to do. I just find these threads confusing and quite hard work, which is why I don't contribute that much. But you are, of course, free to use LEO any way you like.

    #97Author Gibson (418762)  26 Sep 22, 14:43
    Comment

    Re #97


    azhong, I don't know what you mean by "suit"

    → #93


    Like I said in my #88 yesterday, I agree with Gibson re an appropiate approach how to efficiently learn a language.

    #98Author karla13 (1364913) 26 Sep 22, 15:04
    Comment

    I did see #93 but didn't know what it referred to.


    So no - I'm not condemning anybody. I am criticising your approach, but purely from my personal perspective. I'm not telling you what and how to post (which I'm in no position to do anyway).

    #99Author Gibson (418762) 26 Sep 22, 15:10
    Comment

    #97 Gibson: I personally would profit more if I stuck to a set of examples and varied them rather then coming up with new ones.

    #98 Karla: I agree with Gibson re an appropriate approach how to efficiently learn a language.


    Me: Natürlich will ich mich auch ändern und effizienter werden. Ich auch danke für euren Vorschlag. Ich glaube aber, ich weiß nicht genau, was ihr gemeint haben.


    So maybe I'd now also take a look back at my learning methods.


    1) In that exercise of "beide", I just wanted to know more about "beide" and "die beide"[*]. And similar was that one where I practiced "wenig", "ein wenig" and "wenige". I was learning a word or a group of related phrases in these exercises. I am unsure if I've made any sentences to practice verbs and the reflections of adjectives but I ever did that, too.


    2) There are cases where I intended to learn word order.


    3) Sometimes I made a sentence by cut a phrase from this sentence I've studied and another phrase from that sentence, and then I practice them by composing them into a new sentence. By doing this I can also enjoy the pleasure of creation.


    4) Sometimes I try to translate simple sentences that I've read and I think I can roughly handle.


    Or maybe you just share with me how you'd learn a language as an A1 learner? Maybe you can show me an example?


    Finally, thank you for explanation; it did erase the misunderstanding. Your post #83 yesterday had already reminded me of that very-nice female helper I met here. I try not to dislike anyone; but I personally do dislike to be controlled or directed with murmurs. It's partly because I grew up with parents who were poorly educated and worried too much, and thus used to convey their love by controlling and limiting their children.


    [*](I highly value karla's desires to learn, both in English and in her mother's tongue. Few language helpers are as willing to learn their first language as she is. You may say it's something that just "muddies the water" if I, an A1 learner, started a thread like hers to gather the regional expressions of "alle beide", "sie beide", "beide meiner zwei Schwestern", etc. But I think it's surely proper for Karla to ask that question.)

    #100Author azhong (1362382)  27 Sep 22, 04:15
    Comment

    Q: Sind die Sätze 1.2 und 2.2 beide ungrammatisch (oder unidiomatisch)? Danke schön.


    1.1 Sie waren erst wenig als ein Jahr verheiratet.

    1.2 Erst wenig als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet.

    2.1 Sie waren ein junges Paar, sie waren erst wenig als ein Jahr verheiratet.

    2.2 Sie waren ein junges Paar, erst wenig als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet. 


    #101Author azhong (1362382) 27 Sep 22, 05:25
    Comment

    1.1 Sie waren erst weniger als ein Jahr verheiratet.

    1.2 Erst weniger als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet.

    2.1 Sie waren ein junges Paar, sie waren erst weniger als ein Jahr verheiratet.

    2.2 Sie waren ein junges Paar, erst weniger als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet. 


    Du brauchst bei Vergleichen die Steigerungsform:

    groß - größer als

    klein - kleiner als

    schwer - schwerer als

    leicht - leichter als


    Zu 2.1 und 2.2: Schöner wäre in beiden Fällen die Formulierung folgendermaßen:

    Sie waren ein junges Paar, erst weniger als ein Jahr verheiratet.


    Die Wiederholung von "waren sie/sie waren" im zweiten Satzteil kannst du dir sparen, weil es sich um dasselbe Subjekt und Prädikat handelt.


    #102Author fehlerTeufel (1317098) 27 Sep 22, 11:06
    Comment

    Volle Zustimmung zu fehlerTeufels #102


    Anmerkung zu 1.2: Erst weniger als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet.

    Die Wortstellung klingt für mich ungewöhnlich. Außerhalb jeglichen Kontexts halte ich den Satz für wenig idiomatisch.


    Zu 2.2: Sie waren ein junges Paar, erst weniger als ein Jahr verheiratet.

    Weitere Alternative: Sie waren ein junges Paar, das/ welches erst weniger als ein Jahr verheiratet war.

    #103Author karla13 (1364913) 27 Sep 22, 11:59
    Comment

    #103 Karla: Anmerkung zu 1.2: Erst weniger als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet.

    Die Wortstellung klingt für mich ungewöhnlich. Außerhalb jeglichen Kontexts halte ich den Satz für wenig idiomatisch.


    Me: Genau das möchte ich fragen.

    Könntest du mir eine Regel geben, wenn ich ein Subjekt nach hinten setzen NICHT soll? z.B., warum die Wortstellung

    "genau das möchte ich fragen"

    ist idiomatisch (according to Google Translate), die

    *"erst weniger als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet"

    ist aber nicht?


    Danke schön, auch zu derfehlerTeufels Kommentar. Bitte komm manchmal zurück und hilf mir bei den Sätzen, die ich bilde.



    #104Author azhong (1362382)  27 Sep 22, 12:43
    Comment

    #104 Könntest du mir eine Regel geben, wenn ich ein Subjekt NICHT nach hinten setzen NICHT soll?


    Mir ist keine solche Regel bekannt. Meines Erachtens ist es eine Frage der Gebräuchlichkeit und der Betonung. Ich halte den Satz "Erst weniger als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet" für korrekt, aber wenig gebräuchlich als "Sie waren erst weniger als ein Jahr verheiratet". In einem Kontext (wie karla13 in #103 anmerkt) könnte man ihn sich etwa so vorstellen: "Stell dir vor - erst weniger als ein Jahr waren sie verheiratet!" Dabei liegt die Betonung deutlicher auf dem Zeitraum ("weniger als ein Jahr") als in dem anderen Beispiel.


    Die Wortstellung bei "Genau das möchte ich fragen." ist dagegen sehr gebräuchlich. Die Betonung liegt dabei auf "genau das".


    Und noch: Danke schön, auch für zu der fehlerTeufels Kommentar. Bitte komm manchmal zurück und hilf mir bei den Sätzen, die ich bilde.

    #105Author fehlerTeufel (1317098)  27 Sep 22, 13:14
    Comment

    Re #100 @azhong


    Correction:

    (Me: Natürlich will ich mich auch ändern und effizienter werden. Ich bedanke mich auch für euren Vorschlag. Ich glaube aber, ich weiß nicht genau, was ihr gemeint haben.)



    (The following is my personal opinion.):

    Thank you for explaining your learning methods.They seem to be creative and a lot of fun which I find very important when learning a language (and everything else in life). If your methods work for you, fine with me. You have to be content and nobody else.


    Or maybe you just share with me how you'd learn a language as an A1 learner? Maybe you can show me an example?

    I am (probably much) older than you and also a little bit old-fashioned. Therefore, I prefer to work with a textbook, an exercise book and a grammar, accompanied by DVDs for listening comprehension. I would also use free online courses like Duolingo. I would try to read as much as possible. I also would try to learn systematically. And last but not least I would come to the LEO forum to get help from native speakers. Like you already do.


    Your post #83 yesterday had already reminded me of that very-nice female helper I met here. I try not to dislike anyone; but I personally do dislike to be controlled or directed with murmurs.

    I already tried to explain to you (in a PM) that that incident was a misunderstanding on both sides.


    It's partly because I grew up with parents who were poorly educated and worried too much, and thus used to convey their love by controlling and limiting their children.

    I am very sorry to hear that you grew up with those kinds of experiences. Believe me, I do understand you and your concerns very well. But please remember that the LEO participants are not (like) your parents – they are just a (loose?) community of „normal“ people who are not interested in controlling or limiting you (or anybody else, for that matter). What we all share here is our interest, love and fascination for language(s).

    You now have your own thread on LEO and anybody can come and go as they like. Everybody is free within the limits of the LEO netiquette.

    #106Author karla13 (1364913)  28 Sep 22, 00:19
    Comment

    Ich habe eine Frage von #106: Gibt es jeden Unterschied zwischen die zwei Sätze? Vielen Dank.


    1▸Ich bedanke mich bei auch für euren Vorschlag.

    2▸Ich danke euch für euren Vorschlag.


    - sich.A bei jmdm. (für etw.) bedanken: to thank so. (for sth.)  | bedankte, bedankt |

    - jmdm. (für etw.) danken: to thank so. (for sth.)

    #107Author azhong (1362382)  28 Sep 22, 05:29
    Comment

    #106 Karla: You have to be content and nobody else.


    Me: Ich vermute, was du sagen möchtest, ist vielleicht

    Du musst niemanden zufriedenstellen.

    (You don't have to satisfy/content anybody.


    Lassen wir das Thema Lernleistung (learning efficiency) schließen und zu den Idiomatischkeit und Grammtischkeit zurückkommen. Ich bedanke mich bei euch für eure Hilfe.

    #108Author azhong (1362382)  28 Sep 22, 05:53
    Comment

    #106 Karla: I am (probably much) older than you... 


    Me: Oh, don't tell me more. Age is always the top secret for a lady. XD

    But just a note: Don't be so self-confident on your conjecture. I pretty doubt it. XD

    #109Author azhong (1362382)  28 Sep 22, 05:58
    Comment

    007 (Uncorrected)

    Einen schönen Tag wünsche ich euch allen. 


    1.1 „Es ist noch nicht einmal die Zeit zum Abendessen.

    1.2 Wie ist es, wenn wir erst spazieren gehen?“

    ("It's not time for dinner yet. How about if we go for a walk first?")


    2.1 „Ich möchte aber jetzt nicht spazieren gehen.

    2.2 Es ist noch heiß, ich fühle auch müde.

    2.3 Wie ist es, wenn du mir ein Märchen sagst?“

    (I'd not like to go for a walk now. It's still hot, and I feel tired, too. How about if you tell me a story?)


    3.1 Es war einmal tief im Wald ein Turm, da lebte ein schönes Mädchen.

    3.2 Der Turm hatte keine Tür, nur ein Fenster.

    3.3 Das Fenster stand aber sehr hoch, daher konnte es leider überhaupt nicht nach draußen gehen.“

    (“Once upon a time, deep in the forest, there was a tower, where a fair maiden lived. The tower had no door, only a window. But the window was high, so she unfortunately couldn't go out at all.")


    4 „Wie hatte es dann hineingegangen?“

    (How had she entered then?)


    P.S. FYI: I also asked a corresponding question in English here about these lines: "The tower had no door, only a window. But the window was high, so she unfortunately couldn't go out at all."

    #110Author azhong (1362382)  28 Sep 22, 07:02
    Comment

    azhong: Das ist schon sehr gut. ich sehe auf Anhieb nur diese Sätze mit eindeutigen Fehlern:


    2.2: "...ich fühle mich auch müde" ("sich fühlen " ist reflexiv).

    2.3: Wie wäre es, wenn Du mir ein Märchen erzählen würdest? ("sagen" geht hier nicht.)

    4.: Wie war / ist es dann hineingegangen? ("gehen" wird immer mit "sein" gebildet).


    Anmerkung zu 1.1: So wie es da steht bedeutet es: "It's not even time for dinner yet".


    So viel am frühen Morgen. Die Anderen werden bestimmt weitere Anmerkungen haben.

    #111Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 28 Sep 22, 08:11
    Comment

    Re #111


    Apart from 4., I agree with Jesse's #111.



    My corrections and remarks (in bold):


    1.1 „Es ist noch nicht einmal die Zeit zum Abendessen.

    Better:

    Es ist noch nicht Zeit, zu Abend zu essen. or

    Es ist noch nicht (die) Zeit fürs Abendessen.


    1.2 Wie ist wäre es, wenn wir erst spazieren gehen würden?“


    2.1 „Ich möchte aber jetzt nicht spazieren gehen. (Correct)


    2.2 Es ist noch heiß, und ich bin/ fühle mich auch müde. 


    2.3 Wie ist wäre es, wenn du mir ein Märchen [*]/ eine Geschichte sagst erzählen würdest?“


    3.1 „Es war einmal tief im Wald ein Turm, da lebte ein schönes Mädchen. (Correct)


    3.2 Der Turm hatte keine Tür, nur ein Fenster. (Correct)


    3.3 Das Fenster stand war aber sehr hoch, daher konnte es[*]/ sie (besser: das Mädchen) leider überhaupt nicht nach draußen gehen.“


    4 „Wie hatte war es sie dann hineingegangen (better: hineingekommen?“



    [*]

    Re: das Mädchen

    'das Mädchen' in German is neuter, even though a girl is female. It is grammatically correct to use the pronoun 'es' but 'sie' is more logical


    Re: das Märchen

    As your English word is 'story' and not 'fairy tale', I added the alternative 'die Geschichte'. Both would be correct in your sentence.


    #112Author karla13 (1364913)  28 Sep 22, 09:20
    Comment

    #112: Bin einverstanden, außer Deiner Anmerkung zu 4. Ich hätte "es" und "sie" hier als mindestens gleichwertig empfunden.

    #113Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 28 Sep 22, 10:34
    Comment

    #113 Jesse, der Originalsatz lautet: "How had she entered then?"

    #114Author fehlerTeufel (1317098) 28 Sep 22, 10:40
    Comment

    Wenn das Pronomen direkt oder nach kurzem Abstand folgt, ist es das Mädchen - es/das. Das ist immer bei Relativsätzen der Fall: Das Mächen, das in eine neue Schule kam ...

    Wenn dazwischen ein etwas größerer Text steht, wechselt das Pronomen vom grammatisch korrekten "es" zum natürlichen "sie".


    Beispiel aus Duden 9:

    Das Mächen fand rasch neue Freundinnen. Besonders bemühte sie sich um ihre Tischnachbarin.



    OT: Sehr empfehlenswert: Duden 9 - Richtiges und gutes Deutsch

    Antwort auf grammatische und stilistische Fragen, Formulierungshilfen und Erläuterungen zum Sprachgebrauch.


    Die Schlagworte sind alphabetisch angeordnet. Das hilft beim Suchen, weil man auch ohne das grammatische Fachvokabular fündig wird.

    So sind die obigen Anmerkungen unter "Mädchen" zu finden.

    #115Author manni3 (305129)  28 Sep 22, 11:02
    Comment

    #114: Klar, weil das Mädchen auf Englisch nicht Neutrum ist.

    #115 überzeugt mich hingegen.

    #116Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 28 Sep 22, 11:26
    Comment

    Nachtrag (das Zählen auf 18 hat so lange gedauert!) zu Duden 9 in 115:

    So sind die obigen Anmerkungen unter "Mädchen" zu finden. Das ist viel einfacher, als unter 18 Unterpunkten bei "Kongruenz" zu suchen ;-)

    #117Author manni3 (305129)  28 Sep 22, 11:32
    Comment

    Re #107


    Ich habe eine Frage von zu #106: Gibt es jeden einen Unterschied zwischen die  den zwei Sätzen? Vielen Dank.


    1▸Ich bedanke mich bei auch euch für euren Vorschlag.

    2▸Ich danke euch für euren Vorschlag.


    - sich.A bei jmdm. (für etw.) bedanken: to thank so. (for sth.)  | bedankte, bedankt |

    - jmdm. (für etw.) danken: to thank so. (for sth.)


    IMO, there is no difference re the meaning of the two sentences.

    #118Author karla13 (1364913) 28 Sep 22, 23:10
    Comment

    Re #108


    Me: Ich vermute, was du sagen möchtest, ist vielleicht

    Du musst niemanden zufriedenstellen.

    (You don't have to satisfy/content anybody.

    A: Ja, das möchte ich sagen.


    Lassen wir das Thema Lernleistung (learning efficiency) schließen und kommen zur den Idiomatischkeit Idiomatik und Grammtischkeit Grammatik zurückkommen. Ich bedanke mich bei euch für eure Hilfe.

    or:

    Schließen wir das Thema Lernleistung und kommen zurück zur Idiomatik und Grammatik.



    Re #109


    Don't be so self-confident sure on about your conjecture guess/ assumption.

    @azhong, please check that in your other forum. There might be some mistake(s) in your sentence, but I'm not sure.

    #119Author karla13 (1364913)  28 Sep 22, 23:21
    Comment

    Q: Welche Wortstellung ist nicht richtig? Und welche ist die beste oder natürlichste? Vielen Dank.

    1.1 Ich bedanke wieder mich bei euch allen für die Kommentare.

    1.2 Ich bedanke mich wieder bei euch allen für die Kommentare.

    1.3 Wieder bedanke ich mich bei euch allen für die Kommentare.

    (I thank all of you again for your comments.M.)

    #120Author azhong (1362382) 29 Sep 22, 06:26
    Comment

    Von Karla:

    #118 IMO, there is no difference re the meaning of the two sentences.

    #98: I agree with Gibson re an appropriate approach how to efficiently learn a language.

    #82: I do not consent* agree with "quality-related" re beides. IMO, it is also quantity-related.


    Me:

    1 Es gibt auf Englisch kein das Wort "re" (except for as the abbreviation of "reply".) Vielleicht möchtest du "in" sagen?


    2 Ich verstehe das englische Verb "content" auch nicht genau, selten benutze es.


    But according to the dictionary page:

    content: to agree to do something, or to allow someone to do something

    • Very reluctantly, I've consented to lend her my car.
    • My aunt never married because her father wouldn't consent to her marriage. And

    content: to give permission:

    • The director consented to change the ending of the movie.


    Ich vermute, es nicht richtig ist, in deinem Satz "content" zu verwenden. Ich habe hier die Frage gefragt.

    #121Author azhong (1362382)  29 Sep 22, 06:57
    Comment

    #119 Karla: Don't be so self-confident sure on about your conjecture guess/ assumption.

    @azhong, please check that in your other forum.


    Me: Danke. Hier ist es.

    #122Author azhong (1362382) 29 Sep 22, 07:11
    Comment

    Re #120


    1.1 ist nicht richtig.

    1.2 ist/ hat die beste/ natürlichste Wortstellung.

    1.3 betont das "wieder".

    Again, I saw the girl. (I am not sure here if you can put the word order in English like this.)

    #123Author karla13 (1364913) 29 Sep 22, 08:06
    Comment
    "Again, I saw the girl."
    Hat m. E. die Bedeutung: "(Ich sage es) Noch mal: Ich habe das Mädchen gesehen." Wenn z. B. jemand meine Aussage, ich hätte das Mädchen gesehen, anzweifelt.
    #124Author fehlerTeufel (1317098) 29 Sep 22, 08:55
    Comment

    Zu #124


    Richtig, in dem Kontext würde es Sinn machen, dann würde ich es aber auch im Englischen eher mit Doppelpunkt schreiben.

    #125Author karla13 (1364913) 29 Sep 22, 09:13
    Comment

    #123 - #125: "Again, I saw the girl."


    Me: fehlerTeufel hat recht. Auch ist Komma genug. Bitte lest #11 in this thread:

    '"Again, ..." means "To repeat what I said earlier."'


    Ich wusste darüber auch nicht Bescheid.

    #126Author azhong (1362382)  29 Sep 22, 12:26
    Comment

    Q: Welches Paar Ausdrucken ist natürlicher? Vielen Dank.


    1.1 Aber ich glaube nicht, ich weiß, was du genau meinst.

    1.2 Ich glaube aber nicht, ich weiß, was du genau meinst.

    (But I don't think I know what you mean exactly.


    2.1 Aber ich glaube, ich weiß nicht, was du genau meinst.

    2.2 Ich glaube aber, ich weiß nicht, was du genau meinst.

    (But I think I don't know what you mean exactly.


    #127Author azhong (1362382)  29 Sep 22, 12:41
    Comment

    #119 Karla: Schließen wir das Thema Lernleistung und kommen zurück zur Idiomatik und Grammatik.


    Q: Sollte es nicht "kommen ... zurück" nicht heißen? (A separate verb?)

    Schließen wir ... und kommen zur Idiomatik und Grammatik zurück.

    #128Author azhong (1362382)  29 Sep 22, 12:57
    Comment

    @azhong


    FYI: Please note #30 in my thread dealing with the correctness of some German sentences (resulting from your exercises on LEO).

    #129Author karla13 (1364913) 29 Sep 22, 13:32
    Comment

    Got it.

    #130Author azhong (1362382) 29 Sep 22, 13:49
    Comment

    #111 Jesse_Pinkman:

    1.1 „Es ist noch nicht einmal die Zeit zum Abendessen.

    Anmerkung zu 1.1: So wie es da steht bedeutet es: "It's not even time for dinner yet".


    Me: I am unsure, but I think "even" is used this way in English.

    1 It's not time for dinner. 

    2 It's not time for dinner yet

    3 It's not time to sleep yet - not even time for dinner.*

    (Please also read the dictionary Page.)


    [*] The sentence is made by me, so it might be unnatural.


    Q: How would you translate "even" into German? Are the sentences okay?

    1▸Es ist nicht Zeit fürs Abendessen.

    (It's not time for dinner. 


    2▸Es ist noch nicht Zeit fürs Abendessen.

    (It's not time for dinner yet. 


    3▸Es ist noch nicht Zeit zu schlafen - noch nicht einmal Zeit fürs Abendessen.

    (It's not time [u]for sleeping/to sleep[/u] yet - not even time for dinner.

    #131Author azhong (1362382)  29 Sep 22, 14:04
    Comment

    #127-#129:

    Ich habe jetzt den Faden, auf den karla13 in #129 hinweist, nicht gelesen, daher nachfolgend meine Antworten auf die Fragen in #127 ...


    2.1 + 2.2 sind korrekt; 1.1 + 1.2 benötigen ein "dass":

    "Aber ich glaube nicht, dass ich weiß, was du genau meinst."

    "Ich glaube aber nicht, dass ich weiß, was du genau meinst."


    ... und #128:

    Die Varianten mit "kommen zurück" und kommen ... zurück" sind beide idiomatisch. Die erstgenannte Variante ist vermutlich von der englischen Syntax "abgeguckt" (to come back to) und ins Deutsche übernommen worden. Dafür gibt es etliche Beispiele.

     


    #131Author fehlerTeufel (1317098)  29 Sep 22, 14:04
    Comment

    Re #126


    "Again, I saw the girl." → '"Again, ..." means "to repeat what I said earlier."'


    Exactly. That's what fehlerTeufel wrote in #124 and I agreed on in #125.

    But, neither in German nor in English you wanted to express that, but you wanted to express again aka one more time, once again. That's a different meaning.


    Therefore, the question you should ask in WordReference is:

    Is the sentence "Again, I saw the girl." properly put when you wish to say "One more time, I saw the girl."?


    Ha, I think I just found the proper wording (in my head) for what you want to express:

    Once again, I saw the girl. (Here the "once again" is emphasized, like "wieder" in the German sentence.


    By the way: I like the user Uncle Jack in WordReference. His answers seem to be reliable and concise.

    #132Author karla13 (1364913) 29 Sep 22, 14:11
    Comment

    Re #127 (small addendum to fehlerTeufel's #131)


    Q: Welches Paar Ausdrücken ist sind natürlicher?

    or:

    A: Welche Ausdrücke sind jeweils natürlicher/ idiomatischer?



    Re #128


    Q: Sollte es nicht "kommen ... zurück" nicht heißen? (A separate verb?)

    → The verb is "zurückkommen".


    Ich komme zurück.

    Du kommst zurück.

    Er/ sie/ es kommt zurück.

    Wir kommen zurück.

    Ihr kommt zurück.

    Sie kommen zurück.


    kam zurück, zurückgekommen

    #133Author karla13 (1364913)  29 Sep 22, 14:28
    Comment

    @ all


    Very strange, there are two #131 in this thread!


    SYNCHRONPUNKT ! 🥳

    #134Author karla13 (1364913) 29 Sep 22, 14:38
    Comment

    fehlerTeufel's #131: 2.1 + 2.2 sind korrekt; 1.1 + 1.2 benötigen ein "dass"


    Me: That is to say, "dass" cannot be omitted in

    • Ich glaube nicht, dass...

    but it can be omitted in

    • Ich glaube, (dass)... nicht 

    Q: Which expression is more natural in German, to start with "ich glaube nicht" or "Ich glaube"? I was told it's more natural to start with "I don't think ..." in English. (see here.)


    #135Author azhong (1362382)  29 Sep 22, 15:08
    Comment

    Re #135


    Me: That is to say, "dass" cannot be omitted in

    • Ich glaube nicht, dass...

    and it can also not be omitted in

    • Ich glaube, (dass)... nicht 


    In both 1.1 and 1.2, the word "dass" is compulsory.


    Q: Which expression is more natural in German, to start with "ich glaube nicht" or "Ich glaube"?


    Unlike in English, in German it's more natural/ idiomatic to say "Ich glaube, dass ich dich nicht verstehe", IMO.

    But it depends on context and there is only a slight difference in meaning.

    #136Author karla13 (1364913) 29 Sep 22, 15:35
    Comment

    re #121


    Q1 Es gibt auf Englisch kein das Wort "re" nicht. Vielleicht möchtest du "in" sagen?


    A1 You are right. Sorry, sloppy writing. I want to say: refering to/ concerning.



    2 Ich verstehe das englische Verb "content" auch nicht genau und benutze es selten.

    I also use it seldom, and that's why I confused it with "agree".


    Ich vermute, es ist nicht richtig ist, in deinem Satz "content" zu verwenden. Ich habe hier die Frage gefragt gestellt.

    → (to pose a question = eine Frage stellen)



    → Thanks again to putting all of our English language questions on WordReference and sharing the answers here. I really appreciate this and I profit a lot. I hope I won't forget next time... Please always make sure to point out my mistakes to me otherwise I would't learn anything at all. (IAnd I now know that I am your cyberpal, hehe.)

    #137Author karla13 (1364913)  29 Sep 22, 15:54
    Comment

    (Seht #30 im Faden.) Dr. Bopp:

    Alle beide haben rote Haare.

    Sie haben alle beide rote Haare.


    Ich habe die Antwort von Dr. Bopp gelesen, und habe dann eine Frage: I vermute, der Ausdrücke ohne "alle" sind auch grammatisch? (I think "alle" is just added to modify and emphasize "beide"?)


    ? (alle) Beide haben rote Haare. (alle: adj; beide: pronoun)

    ? Sie haben (alle) beide rote Haare. (alle: adv; beide: adj) 

    #138Author azhong (1362382)  30 Sep 22, 04:49
    Comment

    Re #131 @azhong


    3 It's not time to sleep yet - not even time for dinner.

    [*] The sentence is made by me, so it might be unnatural.


    → I cannot say anything about the grammar of the English sentences 1-3. I would rephrase sentence 3 like this but that's just my personal taste:

    3 It's not time for dinner yet - not to mention time to sleep/ to go to bed.



    Q: How would you translate "even" into German?

    A: 'even' has got several meanings, depending on context. The most common translation into German would be "sogar".


    1▸Es ist nicht Zeit fürs Abendessen.

    → This sentence is not idiomatic.


    My suggestions:

    Es ist noch nicht Zeit fürs Abendessen. (not yet)

    Es ist (noch) nicht die richtige Zeit fürs Abendessen. (not yet the proper time)


    2▸Es ist noch nicht Zeit fürs Abendessen.

    Correct.


    3▸Es ist noch nicht Zeit zu schlafen/ zum Schlafen/ fürs Bett und noch nicht einmal Zeit fürs Abendessen.

    → The dash in your sentence doesn't make much sense to me, so I replaced it with 'und'. 'zum Schlafen' and 'fürs Bett' are alternative ways to phrase your sentence.

    #139Author karla13 (1364913)  30 Sep 22, 11:41
    Comment

    Re #139


    Q: Wie würdest du die beide Sätze übersetzen? (Sie sind alle beide natürlich. Sieh hier.) Wie würdest du die Betonung auf „even“ auf Deutsch übersetzen? Vielen Dank.


    Google translate:

    1 Es ist noch nicht Zeit zum Schlafen – es ist noch nicht einmal Zeit fürs Abendessen.

    (It's not time to sleep yet - it's not even time for dinner.


    2 Es ist noch nicht Zeit zum Schlafen – es ist noch nicht einmal Essenszeit.

    (It's not time to sleep yet - it's not even dinnertime.

    #140Author azhong (1362382) 30 Sep 22, 12:46
    Comment

    Re #138


    Ich habe die Antwort von Dr. Bopp gelesen und habe dann eine Frage (dazu*): Ich vermute, die Ausdrücke ohne "alle" sind auch grammatisch? (I think "alle" is just added to modify and emphasize "beide"?)


    → Ja, das stimmt/ du hast Recht (recht *). 'alle' betont 'beide'. Das hast du sehr gut bemerkt.


    ? (alle) Beide haben rote Haare. (alle: adj; beide: pronoun) Correct.

    ? Sie haben (alle) beide rote Haare. (alle: adv; beide: adj) Correct


    (*) 'dazu' means refering to that (→ Frage)

    → ich habe eine Frage dazu = ich habe eine Frage zu der Antwort

    dazu = da zu


    du hast Recht = du hast recht (both spellings are correct)

    #141Author karla13 (1364913) 30 Sep 22, 12:52
    Comment

    Re #140


    Q: Wie würdest du die beiden Sätze übersetzen? (Sie sind alle beide natürlich idiomatisch.)


    1 Es ist noch nicht Zeit zum Schlafen – es ist noch nicht einmal Zeit fürs Abendessen.

    → That's the only correct translation of 'even' in this context. 'sogar' would be wrong here.


    2 Es ist noch nicht Zeit zum Schlafen – es ist noch nicht einmal Essenszeit.

    → Correct.

    #142Author karla13 (1364913)  30 Sep 22, 13:04
    Comment

    Karla: „Wie war/ist sie hineingegangen/ (better: hineingekommen) dann?“

    (How had she entered then?)


    Q: Könntest du bitte erklären, warum "hineinkommen" besser als "hineingehen" ist?

    (In Chinese "go in" is more natural than "come in"; i.e., the audiences will presume they stand outside the tower when they ask the question.)

    #143Author azhong (1362382) 30 Sep 22, 13:42
    Comment

    @ Wie war/ist sie hineingekommen dann?

    Das konjugierte Verb (war/ist) steht an der Position 2 (nach dem Fragewort) [korrekt];

    das Partizip steht am Ende:

    Wie war/ist sie dann hineingekommen?

    #144Author manni3 (305129)  30 Sep 22, 13:53
    Comment

    Re #143, 144


    Siehe meine Korrektur in #112:


    4 „Wie hatte war es sie dann hineingegangen (better: hineingekommen?“

    #145Author karla13 (1364913) 30 Sep 22, 14:00
    Comment

    Re #143


    Q: Könntest du bitte erklären, warum "hineinkommen" besser als "hineingehen" ist?


    A: I would prefer 'hineinkommen' to 'hineingehen' in this context, because the tower has no door, so you cannot (thinking logically) go inside. 'hineinkommen' expresses something passive, like:

    There is a dog in a car even though all doors have been locked for days. Nobody knows how the dog managed to get into the car.

    → Niemand weiß, wie der Hund hineingekommen ist.


    (In Chinese "go in" is more natural than "come in"; i.e., the audiences will presume they stand outside the tower when they ask the question.)

    That's the same in German, but not in this context.

    #146Author karla13 (1364913)  30 Sep 22, 14:15
    Comment

    #146 Karla: 'hineinkommen' expresses something passive, like:

    There is a dog in a car even though all doors have been locked for days. Nobody knows how the dog managed to get into the car.

    → Niemand weiß, wie der Hund hineingekommen ist.


    Me: Yes, this is exactly what I am asking, and thank you.

    But still, I don't understand what you mean by "passive". The action of a dog getting in a car is an active action, isn't it?


    Active: The dog entered the car.

    Passive: The dog was placed into the car.

    #147Author azhong (1362382)  30 Sep 22, 14:46
    Comment

    Re #147


    But still, I don't understand what you mean by "passive".

    Passive in this case means: somebody put/ placed the dog into the car. It (the dog) was put there. It didn't enter the car by itsself.

    Like the girl in the tower. Somebody put her there. She didn't go there by free will.


    The action of a dog getting in a car is an active action, isn't it?

    Usually, yes.


    Active: The dog entered the car.

    Passive: The dog was placed into the car.

    Exactly.


    HTH 😉

    #148Author karla13 (1364913)  30 Sep 22, 15:13
    Comment

    008 (Uncorrected)

    Vielen Dank. Einen schönen Tag wünsche ich euch.


    1 Im Frühjahr habe ich einige Bücher gekauft, aber ich hatte keine Zeit, sie zu lesen.

    (In the spring I bought some books, but I didn't have time to read them.


    2 Erst letzten Monat wurde ich Zeit haben, wählte ein Buch aus und fing an, es zu lesen. 

    (Not until last month did I become available, pick a book and start reading it.


    3 Drei habe ich letzten Monat gelesen. Alle waren leider nicht so interessant, mir gefielen kein von ihnen. 

    (I read three last month. Unfortunately, all of them were not that interesting, and I didn't like any of them.


    4 Daher habe ich alle die drei nicht zu Ende gelesen.

    (So I didn't finish reading all the three.

    #149Author azhong (1362382) 01 Oct 22, 13:45
    Comment

    Re #149


    1 Im Frühjahr habe ich einige Bücher gekauft, aber ich hatte (noch) keine Zeit, sie zu lesen.

    → Your sentence is correct. You could add 'noch' to express 'not yet'.


    2 Erst (im) letzten Monat wurde hatte ich Zeit haben, wählte ein Buch aus und fing an, es zu lesen. 

    (Not until last month did I become available, pick a book and start reading it.

    → You should let have checked your English sentence in WordReference; I think it is not correct like it is.


    3 Drei Bücher habe ich letzten Monat gelesen. Alle waren leider nicht so interessant, mir gefielen keines von ihnen. 

    → Your sentences are now correct, however, the word order is quite unusual. I would rephrase them as follows:

    3 Ich habe im letzten Monat/ letzten Monat drei (Bücher) gelesen.

    Leider waren alle nicht so interessant – mir hat keines von ihnen gefallen.


    4 Daher habe ich alle die drei nicht zu Ende gelesen.

    (So I didn't finish reading all the three of them.

    → Please check on WordReference.Your sentence is correct. You could add 'noch' to express 'not yet'.


    #150Author karla13 (1364913)  01 Oct 22, 16:54
    Comment

    Re #56 @Cro-Mignon


    Siehe hierzu Dr. Bopps Antwort in diesem Faden.

    #151Author karla13 (1364913)  01 Oct 22, 22:42
    Comment

    #150 Karla: (So I didn't finish reading all the three of them.

    → Please check it ...


    Me: see here.

    #152Author azhong (1362382)  02 Oct 22, 07:10
    Comment

    #150 Karla: (Not until last month did I become available, pick a book and start reading it.

    → You should check your English sentence...


    Me: See here and the comment following it. Attached below:


    "Q1: I think the sentence (I made) is grammatical?

    1. In the spring I bought some books, but I didn't have time to read them until last month, when I picked one out and start started reading it.

    Q2: How about if I want to cut it into two shorter sentences? How about 2.2.1 and 2.2.2?

    2.1 In the spring I bought some books, but I didn't have time to read them.

     2.2.1 Not until last month did I become available, pick one out and start reading it.

     2.2.2 It came only to last month when I became available, picked ... and started ..."


    Comment: Sentences 1, 2.1, and 2.2.1 are all fine for me (well, sentence 1 should have "started" instead of "start", but I don't think that's what you're asking about), but 2.2.2 doesn't work. You could say "It was only last month that I became available, picked one out, and started reading it."

    #153Author azhong (1362382)  02 Oct 22, 07:18
    Comment

    "available" kannst Du hier nicht im Sinn von "Zeit haben" verwenden; vielleicht ist es das, was Karla meinte. "Available" ist man immer für jemand anderen, nicht für etwas, das man selbst tun will.

    #154Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 02 Oct 22, 10:14
    Comment

    Re #154

    Genau das meinte ich, Jesse.


    Edit:

    Re #152, 153

    Thanks again, @azhong. These discussions are ever so interesting for me as an English learner.

    It's very funny to read that not even the NES agree on some of the topics, seems to be a little bit like on LEO sometimes.

    I'm also impressed by the friendly tone of all the users in what I read so far.

    #155Author karla13 (1364913)  02 Oct 22, 10:32
    Comment

    #154 JessiJesse_Pinkman: "Available"...


    Me: Vielen dank. In fact I didn't catch that. I thought the error occurred on "not until".

    #156Author azhong (1362382)  03 Oct 22, 06:59
    Comment

    #155 Karla: It's very funny*1 to read that not even the NES all the NES's* agree on some of the topics, seems to be a little bit like on LEO sometimes.


    P.S. : I think "all" is necessary here. I am not sure if "NES's" is correct for "native English Speakers".

    #157Author azhong (1362382) 03 Oct 22, 07:13
    Comment

    #154 Jesse_Pinkman: "Available"...


    Me: I am still unsure after looking the word up in the dictionary, so I asked a question here. Let's wait if there's any comments.

    #158Author azhong (1362382)  03 Oct 22, 07:36
    Comment

    #158: Gut, lass uns die Antwort wissen! Du hast meinen Satz auch gut übersetzt.

    Ich bin mir in dieser Sache allerdings ziemlich sicher. Aber möglicherweise haben auch die NES hier auf LEO etwas dazu zu sagen.

    #159Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 03 Oct 22, 08:54
    Comment

    #159 und @azhong


    Obwohl ebenfalls kein ENS, bin ich mir dieser Sache auch ziemlich sicher. Deshalb hatte ich den ganzen Satz ja ursprünglich angemerkt.


    Ich hatte darin 3 Fehler vermutet: not until last month, available und die Zeitformen der Verben.

    #160Author karla13 (1364913) 03 Oct 22, 09:02
    Comment

    #157


    I am not sure if "NES's" is correct for "native English Speakers".


    NES is an in-house abbreviation used on LEO, as far as I know. I don't know if it is utilized anywhere else.

    #161Author karla13 (1364913) 03 Oct 22, 09:12
    Comment

    #161: "not until last month (did I)" ist völlig korrekt für "erst letzten Monat ..."

    #162Author penguin (236245) 03 Oct 22, 09:52
    Comment

    #162


    Danke, das du das noch einmal bestätigst (war bei WordReference auch so geschehen).


    Ich hatte darin 3 Fehler vermutet: (#160)

    Ich kann halt häufig nur vermuten, da ich keine NES bin.

    #163Author karla13 (1364913) 03 Oct 22, 10:45
    Comment

    (NES)

    Your English sentences in #149:


    Sentence 2: No, "available" is not suitable here.


    Not until last month did I ... Yes, this is correct.

    You can also say "It was not / wasn't until last month that I [had time to / found the time to ...]"


    Sentences 3 and 4: Unfortunately, all of them were not that interesting

     So I didn't finish reading all the three.

    "All" doesn't go well with a negative verb. I'd say, for instance:


    All of them were rather uninteresting/dull.

    None of them were* that/very interesting. (* Or "was": some more pedantic people insist that "none" should take a singular verb.)

    I didn't find any of them that/very interesting. (But you use "I didn't" in the following sentences.)


    So I didn't finish any of them.

    So I left all of them unfinished.


    Edit: I need to correct what I said above, "All" doesn't go well with a negative verb.

    As so often, it depends. You can say:

    "I bought four books when I was in London three months ago, but I haven't read them all yet." In other words, I have read some of them but not all four.

    The difference seems to be whether you are talking about "some but not all of them" or whether you are saying something negative in relation to all of them.

    #164AuthorHecuba - UK (250280)  03 Oct 22, 12:53
    Comment

    Re #164 @Hecuba - UK


    Vielen Dank für deine interessanten Ausführungen.


    Sentence 2: No, "available" is not suitable here.

    Original: (Not until last month did I become available, pick a book and start reading it.)


    Wie würde man das 'Zeit haben' denn dann idiomatisch ausdrücken:

    (Erst (im) letzten Monat hatte ich Zeit, wählte ein Buch aus und fing an, es zu lesen.)

    Mein Vorschlag (mit Varianten): →Not until last month did I have the time/ [did I manage to make some time?/ was I free?], picked a book and started reading it.


    NB: Ich weiß nicht, ob du es bemerkt hattest, aber im Link in #152 wird der zweite Teil deiner Antwort auch ausführlicher diskutiert.

    #165Author karla13 (1364913) 03 Oct 22, 14:00
    Comment

    Mein Vorschlag (mit Varianten): →Not until last month did I have the time/ [did I manage to make some time?/ was I free?], picked a book and started reading it.


    Grammatical point: it would have to be did I have ... , pick ... and start... -- "did I" introduces all three verbs.


    But I wouldn't have three parallel main verbs. I would say, for instance,

    It wasn't until last month that I had the time / found the time to pick a book and start reading it.

    Or, in the nice sentence that azhong gave in #153,

    In the spring I bought some books, but I didn't have time to read them until last month, when I picked one out and start started reading it.


    On your last point: yes, though I think it's quite arduous to have to go through another thread as well as this one, especially as the other one is very much taken up with different questions such as whether "to read a book" implies reading it to the end.

    #166AuthorHecuba - UK (250280) 03 Oct 22, 16:56
    Comment

    #159 Jesse_Pinkman, #164 Hecuba:

    *"I became available"

    "I had time to V" or "I found the time to V"


    Me: Danke für eure Kommentare. You have helped me once again.

    #167Author azhong (1362382)  04 Oct 22, 03:44
    Comment

    To penguin, Hecuba - UK: Please come at times and provide some language comments. Thank you.



    #168Author azhong (1362382) 04 Oct 22, 04:08
    Comment

    #164 Hucuba: "I bought four books when I was in London three months ago, but I haven't read them all yet." In other words, I have read some of them but not all four.

    The difference seems to be whether you are talking about "some but not all of them" or whether you are saying something negative in relation to all of them.


    Me: 

    Exactly. I spent some time to review this sentence pattern I learned in high school yesterday. It seems that "not ...all", "both... noth" "every... noth", etc can have two meanings and thus possibly ambiguous. E.g.

    • I don't finish reading all the four books.

    can mean either 1) "I finish one, two or three of the four books but not all four", or 2) "I finish none of the four."


    Examples in 1):

    • All that glitters is not gold. (Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, 1597)

    Examples in 2):

    • All the money in the world won’t make you happy then.
    • Not all the water in rough rude sea can wash the balm off from an anointed king


    P.S.: And what I intended to say was actually "none of the three books were interesting, so I finished none of them". I'll memorize these different expressions practice them again later.

    #169Author azhong (1362382) 04 Oct 22, 04:30
    Comment

    008-1 (Uncorrected)

    Vielen Dank. Ich wünsche euch allen einen schönen Tag und viel Holz für den kommenden Winter.


    1▸Ich mag alle drei Bücher.

    (I like all three books.


    2.1▸Ich mag alle drei Bücher nicht, ich mag nur ein von ihr. 

    2.1▸Ich mag alle drei Bücher nicht, nur ein von ihr mag ich. 

    (I don't like all three books; I like only one of them.


    3.1▸Ich mag kein die drei Büchern.

    3.2▸Ich mag alles die drei Büchern nicht.

    3.3▸Alles die drei Büchern mag ich nicht.

    (I like none of the three books. 

    #170Author azhong (1362382) 04 Oct 22, 05:01
    Comment

    Ich mag alle drei Bücher --> korrekt

    ... nur ein von ihr --> nur eines davon, nur eines der Bücher

    ... kein die --> keines davon, keines der Bücher (ohne 'n')

    ... alles die drei Büchern --> die drei Bücher (ohne 'alle' und ohne 'n')

    #171Author penguin (236245) 04 Oct 22, 08:28
    Comment

    @ nur ein von ihr --> nur eines von ihr/davon


    Entsprechend in 3.3:

    I like none of the three books.

    Ich mag keines der drei Bücher.


    "ein" ist hier kein Artikel, sondern ein Pronomen.

    #172Author manni3 (305129)  04 Oct 22, 09:13
    Comment

    I agree with #171 and #172


    As there are several ways to express what you want to say, I put four alternative solutions:


    2.1▸Ich mag alle drei Bücher nicht, ich mag nur ein von ihr. 

    → 2.1 Von den drei Büchern mag ich nur eines.

    2.2▸Ich mag alle drei Bücher nicht, nur ein von ihr mag ich. 

    → 2.2 Von den drei Büchern mag ich nur eines.

    (I don't like all three books; I like only one of them.


    IMO, both your German sentences are not worded logically. I put my suggestions below yours.

    Your English sentence doesn't express the same as the German one(s).

    The position of 'nur' in both sentences is correct, there's only a slight difference in meaning.

    (ich mag nur eines von ihnen / nur eines von ihnen mag ich)


    3.2▸Ich mag alles die drei Büchern nicht.

    → 3.2▸Ich mag alle drei Bücher nicht.

    3.3▸Alles die drei Büchern mag ich nicht.

    → Alle drei Bücher mag ich nicht.

    'alle' here stresses the 'drei Bücher', I therefore wouldn't omit it.

    #173Author karla13 (1364913)  04 Oct 22, 09:50
    Comment

    #171 Penguin: eines der Bücher; keines der Bücher 


    Eine Frage: Es passiert "ich mag eines der Bücher" und "ich mag keines der Bücher". Passiert es auch "ich mag alles der Bücher"? Sind die Beispiele korrekt? Vielen Dank.

    • 1 Ich mag alles der Bücher. Ich mag es. (= Ich mag alle die Bücher. Ich mag sie.)
    • 2 Ich mag alles drei Bücher. (= Ich mag alle drei Bücher.)
    • 3 Ich mag alles der Bücher nicht. (= Ich mag die Bücher nicht.)
    • 4 Ich mag alles drei Bücher nicht. (= Ich mag die drei Bücher nicht.)
    #174Author azhong (1362382) 04 Oct 22, 09:57
    Comment

    passiert --> passt


    You are using "alles" incorrectly. "alles" means "everything" and not "all of them".

    And "alle die" in your first example is also used incorrectly, ether "alle" or "die", but not both.

    "es" is singular or uncount, not plural, you have to use "sie".


    All four sentences in bold are incorrect, but I'll let others explain the finer grammar points.

    #175Author penguin (236245)  04 Oct 22, 10:18
    Comment

    1 Ich mag alle Bücher. Ich mag sie. 

    2 Ich mag alle drei Bücher.

    3 Ich mag alle Bücher nicht. 

    4 Ich mag alle drei Bücher nicht. 


    PS: zu spät. Egal.

    #176Author eastworld (238866)  04 Oct 22, 10:20
    Comment

    Statt 3. hätte ich gesagt: Ich mag keines der Bücher.

    #177Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 04 Oct 22, 10:50
    Comment

    Ja, das kann man natürlich auch. Aber azhong übt "alle / alles".

    #178Author penguin (236245) 04 Oct 22, 11:01
    Comment

    Yes, I am. Thank you all for your comments and sentences. Now it's my turn to think about your replies carefully. Thank you all again.

    #179Author azhong (1362382) 04 Oct 22, 11:23
    Comment

    Coming back to English again: comments on #169


    You say "not ...all", [...], etc can have two meanings and [is] thus possibly ambiguous. E.g.

    • I don't finish reading all the four books.

    can mean either 1) "I finish one, two or three of the four books but not all four", or 2) "I finish none of the four."


    That sentence is not a good example, because nobody would say "I don't finish reading all (the) four books" with meaning 2). It is just not idiomatic. For meaning 2) you need to use "none" or "not ... any".

    So the sentence only has one meaning, meaning 1), and is not ambiguous.



    All that glitters is not gold. (Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, 1597) [Actually "glisters".]

    If you are trying to establish what is correct in present-day English, I don't think it's helpful to use an example that is several hundred years old! * (In fact it's believed that this proverb existed long before Shakespeare's day.) If one were saying this now, in normal everyday speech, one would say "Not everything that glitters is gold".

    Anyway, this thread has been about "all" used in the plural, and this is singular.


    *The same applies to the other quotation, Not all the water in the rough rude sea can ... . This, too, is archaic and poetic, not standard modern English.



    I think it must be very hard to try to deal with these subtle points in English and German at the same time!

    #180AuthorHecuba - UK (250280)  04 Oct 22, 18:42
    Comment

    Re #166, 180 @Hecuba


    Danke für die hilfreichen Erklärungen in beiden Beiträgen.

    Ich stimme dir zu, der verlinkte WordReference-Faden war "arduous" to read (through?)".


    I think it must be very hard to try to deal with these subtle points in English and German at the same time!

    Allerdings, das finde ich auch extrem schwer -- und dann auch noch mit Mandarin als Muttersprache!

    Ich muss bei manchen deutschen Sätzen schon nachgrübeln, welcher nun richtig oder falsch (und warum) ist. Die Nuancen sind manchmal wirklich tricky.

    #181Author karla13 (1364913) 04 Oct 22, 23:15
    Comment

    #180 Hecuba: I think it must be very hard to try to deal with these subtle points in English and German at the same time!

    #181 Karla:Allerdings, das finde ich auch extrem schwer -- und dann auch noch mit Mandarin als Muttersprache!


    Me: Das ist jetzt vielleicht schwer und schwierig, aber genau dafür bin ich hier. Und es will besser werden.

    In fact I felt happy when reading your comment that "all" is used in singular in those archaic sentences, not in plural, the usage I am practicing. I didn't notice that.

    The process of learning languages always goes with errors and corrections. Please keep your comments, all the way very concise and helpful. I look forward to learning English from you, too.

    @Karla: I am quite fine and very interested in learning languages. Let's help one another and focus on separate language learning.

    #182Author azhong (1362382)  05 Oct 22, 08:28
    Comment

    Re #182


    Und es wird besser werden. 😉


    Let's help one another and focus on separate language learning.

    Yeah, let's do that!

    #183Author karla13 (1364913) 05 Oct 22, 08:34
    Comment

    Karla: Ich stimme dir zu, der verlinkte WordReference-Faden war "arduous" to read (through?)".


    Me: I googled and found that "to read through" should be okay. E.g.,


    A small army of men and women read through hundreds of books and submitted tens of thousands of quotations.

    • read through sth: read written or printed matter from beginning to end.
    • army : a large group of people who are involved in a particular activity
    • submit: to give or offer something for a decision to be made by others
    #184Author azhong (1362382)  05 Oct 22, 08:38
    Comment

    Re #184


    Danke, @azhong. Vielleicht bestätigt Hecuba das später noch...

    #185Author karla13 (1364913) 05 Oct 22, 08:43
    Comment

    Q: Sind die Sätze korrekt? Und wie ist meine Verständigung? Vielen Dank.


    (1) I don't like all three books; I like part of them: 4.1, 4.3,

    (2) I like none of the three books.: 4.2, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6


    4.1 Ich mag nicht alle drei Bücher.

    4.2 Ich mag alle drei Bücher nicht.

    4.3 Nicht alle drei Bücher mag ich.

    4.4 Alle drei Bücher mag ich nicht.

    4.5 Die drei Bücher alle mag ich nicht.  

    4.6 Alle drei Bücher mag ich nicht.

    #186Author azhong (1362382)  05 Oct 22, 09:43
    Comment

    Q: Sind meine Sätze und Verständigung korrekt? Vielen Dank.


    5.1 Die Bücher sind nicht alle gut. 

    (Some are good and some are not.) 

    5.2 Die Bücher sind alle nicht gut.

    (None is good.)


    #187Author azhong (1362382) 05 Oct 22, 10:11
    Comment

    Re #186, 187


    Was meinst du mit "Verständigung"?


    4.4 und 4.6 sind identisch.

    Nur 4.5 ist falsch, alle anderen Sätze sind korrekt.


    I like part of them: 4.1, 4.3 --> dieser Teil fehlt im Deutschen.


    5.1 und 5.2 sind korrekt.

    #188Author karla13 (1364913)  05 Oct 22, 10:33
    Comment

    ## 181, 184: Yes, "to read through" is OK.

    But note that I didn't say (in #166) that the WordReference thread was arduous to read through. I said that it's quite arduous to have to go through another thread as well as this one, i.e. to have to deal with two threads at the same time.

    #189AuthorHecuba - UK (250280) 05 Oct 22, 10:51
    Comment

    #189


    Ja, das stimmt, Entschuldigung fürs falsche Zitieren...


    Mir war nur noch "arduous" in Erinnerung, weil ich das als neues Wort von dir gelernt hatte. 😉

    #190Author karla13 (1364913) 05 Oct 22, 10:57
    Comment

    #186 I like part of them.


    This isn't good English. What do you mean?

    #191AuthorHecuba - UK (250280) 05 Oct 22, 11:09
    Comment

    Re #191


    Me: With "I like part of them" I mean "I like not all but a few of the books". Am I using "part of" wrongly?

    #192Author azhong (1362382) 05 Oct 22, 11:26
    Comment

    #188 Karla: Was meinst du mit "Verständigung"?


    Me: understanding? "Is my understanding (about the sentences) correct"?

    #193Author azhong (1362382) 05 Oct 22, 11:28
    Comment

    #188 Karla: falsch: 4.5. Die drei Bücher alle mag ich nicht. 


    Q: Warum geht es falsch? Wie ist

    2. Die drei Bücher sind alle gut. 

    3. Die drei Bücher mag ich alle nicht. 

    #194Author azhong (1362382) 05 Oct 22, 11:36
    Comment

    Re #194


    Q: Warum ist es falsch? Wie ist

    2. Die drei Bücher sind alle gut.  korrekt

    3. Die drei Bücher mag ich alle nicht. korrekt


    The meaning of the two sentences is different, though.

    #195Author karla13 (1364913) 05 Oct 22, 11:47
    Comment

    Verständigung means "comprehension", as in "you can make yourself understood, I understood what you said"

    What you mean is Verständnis, you just chose the wrong translation.

    #196Author penguin (236245) 05 Oct 22, 11:49
    Comment

    #196


    [Lichtaufgeh]

    (explanation for @azhong: slang for "I see!")

    #197Author karla13 (1364913) 05 Oct 22, 11:52
    Comment

    #192 "part of them" -- "part" in the sense of "a few, but not all":


    I don't think we ever speak of "part" of something which is in the plural. (If there are exceptions to this, I expect someone will tell me!)


    If there are, say, ten books, you may like a few of them, some of them, about half of them, most of them, etc., but not part of them.

    Speaking of a single book, you might say "I've only read part of it so far".

    #198AuthorHecuba - UK (250280)  05 Oct 22, 13:43
    Comment

    Re #186, 187


    Sorry, @azhong and @ll others:

    I still don't completely understand what you want to express with


    Sind meine Sätze und Verständigung korrekt?


    What @penguin said #186: Verständigung = Verständnis

    What @azhong said in #193: Verständigung = understanding


    → If I understand correctly, you (azhong) are asking if you are understanding the sentences correctly. But: How should I (or anybody else?) know? I (or the others) can only tell if you constructed/ formed the sentences properly.


    So did you intend to say:

    → Are my sentences formed/ constructed correctly?


    If so, your German sentence should be:

    → Sind meine Sätze richtig/ korrekt gebildet? (Ist mein Satz richtig/ korrekt gebildet?)

    Or just: → Sind meine Sätze richtig/ korrekt? (Ist mein Satz richtig/ korrekt?)


    Sorry if I seemingly make things complicated. Maybe it's just my brain which is a little slow this evening... 🙁

    #199Author karla13 (1364913) 05 Oct 22, 18:57
    Comment

    Ich gehe davon aus, dass er meint: Habe ich das so richtig verstanden? Und dann kommen die Sätze.

    #200Author Gibson (418762) 05 Oct 22, 19:01
    Comment

    Please let me ask my questions in #186 again in another narration.


    Actually I asked two questions.

    Q1 I made these sentences 4.1-4.6. Are they correct? (And You have answered the question. Thank you.)

    Q2. The meanings of these sentences can be divided into two groups,

    (1) "I don't like all three books, but just a few of them."

    And I think sentence 4.1 and 4.3 belong to this group.

    4.1 Ich mag nicht alle drei Bücher.

    4.3 Nicht alle drei Bücher mag ich.


    (2) "I don't like any of them."

    And I think sentence 4.2, 4.4/4.6 and 4.5 belong to this group.

    4.2 Ich mag alle drei Bücher nicht.

    4.4 Alle drei Bücher mag ich nicht.

    4.5 Die drei Bücher alle mag ich nicht.  

    4.6 Alle drei Bücher mag ich nicht.

    Is my understanding correct?

    Now that it seems I haven't received any corrections on Q2, I suppose my understanding is correct?


    Thank you.

    #201Author azhong (1362382) 06 Oct 22, 05:10
    Comment

    To Gibson:

    Ich bin sehr froh, deine Antwort wieder zu sehen.


    I was actually a bit worried if you had any misunderstanding or emotions on my latest post to you.

    Please come and comment sometimes, which I thank you in advance.

    But I also need your generosity to leave me some space and not to get that harsh on grammar-unrelated issues. Every child can have his own way to enjoy a piece of delicious cake or a tough hiking.

    My A1-level sentences might be not that interesting, which I agree, but they are definitely seriously composed. Time will prove I'm a diligent learner, one who study hard.


    Wieder danke ich dir mit deine mögliche Hilfe.

    #202Author azhong (1362382) 06 Oct 22, 05:30
    Comment

    Wie ist der Satz? Ist er idiomatisch?



    Keine meiner drei Schwestern sind keine Köchinnen.

    =Meine drei Schwestern sind alle Köchinnen.

    =Alle meine drei Schwestern sind Köchinnen.

    (None of my three sisters are nor cooks.)


    #203Author azhong (1362382) 06 Oct 22, 05:46
    Comment

    009 (Uncorrected) 

    Ich wünsche euch alle für den kommenden Winter viel Holz.


    1. Vor einige Monate habe ich in einer Buchhandlung drei Bücher gewählt und vermutet, dass ich alle drei mögen würde. 

    2. Bisher habe ich sie alle zu Ende gelesen, davon zieht mich leider nur eines an. 

    3. Mein Nachbar hat auch sie geliehen und gelesen. Er sagte, dass keines davon ihm gefielt, weil alle drei Geschichten für ihn zu schwierig waren. 

    4. Außerdem hat meine Schwester die drei Bücher gelesen. Sie hielt zwei des Bücher für wunderbar. 

    5. Das Buch, das gefällt ihr nicht so, ist aber genau das einzige, was mir gefällt.

    6. Bücher, glaube daher ich, sind gerade wie Speisen. Was zieht man an, zieht nicht noch immer jemand anderes an.


    1. Several months ago I picked three books in a bookstore, supposing I'd like all three. 

    2. So far I've finished reading all; unfortunately, only one of them attracts me. 

    3. My neighbor borrowed and read them, too. He said none pleased him because all three of the stories were too complicated for him. 

    4. In addition, my sister read the three books, too. She think two of them are wonderful.

    5. However, the book that doesn't please her so is exactly the only one that pleases me. 

    6. Books, I think then, are just like dishes; what attracts one doesn't always attract someone else.

    #204Author azhong (1362382) 06 Oct 22, 06:15
    Comment

    Re #203


    You: Wie ist der Satz? Ist er idiomatisch?

    Me: Nein, der Satz ist nicht idiomatisch.


    Keine meiner drei Schwestern sind keine Köchinnen.

    → Keine meiner drei Schwestern ist (eine) Köchin.


    =Meine drei Schwestern sind alle Köchinnen.

    → That sentence is idiomatic, but expresses the opposite of your original sentence. Therefore, = is not correct.


    =Alle meine drei Schwestern sind Köchinnen.

    → That sentence is idiomatic, but expresses the opposite of your original sentence. Therefore, = is not correct.


    (None of my three sisters are nor cooks.)

    → I don't understand your sentence; I think it is not idiomatic.

    #205Author karla13 (1364913) 06 Oct 22, 08:22
    Comment

    Re #201


    You: Is my understanding correct? Now that it seems I haven't received any corrections on Q2, I suppose my understanding is correct?

    Me: Yes and yes.


    4.5 Die drei Bücher alle mag ich nicht.  

    → The word order is wrong here. Correct is: 4.5 Die drei Bücher mag ich alle nicht. 

    #206Author karla13 (1364913) 06 Oct 22, 08:33
    Comment

    @ 4.5 Die drei Bücher alle mag ich nicht. → [Die drei Bücher]₁ [mag]₂ ich alle nicht.


    Grundregel im Satzbau bei Aussagesätzen und Sätzen mit W-Fragen:

    Das konjugierte Verb steht an der Position 2 - s. #144


    #207Author manni3 (305129)  06 Oct 22, 09:45
    Comment

    Re #204


    009 (corrected) 

    Ich wünsche euch allen für den kommenden Winter viel Holz.


    1. Vor einigen Monaten habe ich in einer Buchhandlung drei Bücher (aus)gewählt und vermutete, dass ich alle drei mögen würde. 

    → The sentence (including the corrections) is now grammatically correct and understandable. To make it more idiomatic, I would rephrase it:

    1. Vor einigen Monaten habe ich in einer Buchhandlung drei Bücher gekauft/ (aus)gewählt, weil ich dachte/ vermutete, dass sie mir alle drei gefallen könnten. 


    2. Bisher habe ich sie alle zu Ende gelesen, leider davon zieht mich davon leider nur eines an. 

    → The sentence is now grammatically correct and understandable. To make it more idiomatic, I would rephrase it:

    Jetzt habe ich sie alle zu Ende gelesen, aber leider gefällt mir nur eines davon. 


    3. Mein Nachbar hat auch sie sich auch (aus)geliehen und gelesen. Er sagte, dass keines davon ihm gefielt, weil alle drei Geschichten für ihn zu schwierig waren. 

    The sentence is now grammatically correct and understandable. Again, to make it more idiomatic, I would rephrase it:

    3. Mein Nachbar hat sie sich auch ausgeliehen und gelesen. Er sagte/ hat gesagt, dass keines davon ihm gefallen hätte/ hatte, weil alle drei Geschichten für ihn zu schwierig waren/ (gewesen) wären. 


    4. Außerdem hat meine Schwester die drei Bücher gelesen. Sie hielt zwei der Bücher für wunderbar. 

    The sentences are now grammatically correct and understandable. Again, to make the last one more idiomatic, I would rephrase it:

    4. Sie hielt zwei der Bücher für gut/ lesenswert/ interessant. 


    5. Das Buch, das ihr nicht so gefällt ihr nicht so, ist aber genau das einzige, das/ welches was mir gefällt.


    6a. Bücher, glaube ich daher ich, sind gerade wie Speisen.

    The sentence is now grammatically correct and understandable. Nevertheless, it isn't very elegant. My suggestions:

    6a. Ich glaube, dass Bücher wie Speisen sind.

    6a. Ich glaube, dass Bücher vergleichbar mit Speisen sind.


    6b. Was zieht man an, zieht nicht noch immer jemand anderes an.

    → 'anziehen' in this context means 'attract', which in German (and I believe in English, too) is only applicable to people, not to objects. 'gefallen (and 'like') is more appropiate, IMO. The whole sentence is not idiomatic and has to be rephrased:

    6b. Was dem einen gefällt, gefällt dem anderen noch lange nicht.



    Concerning the English sentences, I suspect that some of them are not idiomatic either. Just in case Hecuba (or another NES/ expert) doesn't come by, I have underlined the parts which I find questionable. You could clear that up in WordReference.

    1. Several months ago I picked three books in a bookstore, supposing I'd like all three

    2. So far I've finished reading all; unfortunately, only one of them attracts me. 

    3. My neighbor borrowed and read them, too. He said none pleased him because all three of the stories were too complicated for him. 

    4. In addition, my sister read the three books, too. She thinks two of them are wonderful.

    5. However, the book that doesn't please her so is exactly the only one that pleases me. 

    6. Books, I think then, are just like dishes; what attracts one doesn't always attract someone else.


    #208Author karla13 (1364913)  06 Oct 22, 18:50
    Comment

    #201 (1) "I don't like all three books, but just a few of them."

    If there are only three books, you can't like "a few" of them. You can only like either one of them or two of them. "A few" is normally at least three.


    #205 Karla: When azhong wrote in #203 Keine meiner drei Schwestern ist keine Köchin, I think that that is what he meant, and it does mean the same as Alle meine drei Schwestern sind Köchinnen. The question is whether anyone would say it with the two negatives.


    #203: None of my three sisters are nor cooks -- you mean "are not cooks".


    azhong, I think it would be better if you slowed down a bit. If I have counted correctly (but possibly I haven't), in these first six days of October you have created 23 posts, about 12 of which contain substantial questions. And as well as the grammatical questions that are your main concern, there are also other aspects which give rise to discussion which leads away from the central questions. There is just too much to comment on.

    This is of course just my personal opinion.

    #209AuthorHecuba - UK (250280)  06 Oct 22, 22:37
    Comment

    Re #209


    #205 Karla: When azhong wrote in #203 Keine meiner drei Schwestern ist keine Köchin, I think that that is what he meant, and it does mean the same as Alle meine drei Schwestern sind Köchinnen.


    Ach, natürlich, du hast vollkommen Recht, das soll es bestimmt bedeuten.

    Aber es ist so unidiomatisch, dass ich es nicht mal begriffen habe.


    The question is whether anyone would say it with the two negatives.

    Der einzige Kontext, den ich mir "hinbiegen" könnte, wäre ein Rätsel wie "um die Ecke gedacht".


    #203: None of my three sisters are nor cooks -- you mean "are not cooks".

    Oh, klar. Ist der Satz im Englischen denn idiomatisch?

    #210Author karla13 (1364913) 06 Oct 22, 23:03
    Comment

    Re #209


    Last paragraph (your edit):

    I agree with you, Hecuba. Actually, I intended to write a comment expressing a similar opinion, especially after reading #202 and dealing with the exercise sentences in #204 today.



    @azhong

    You wrote: My A1-level sentences might be not that interesting, which I agree, but they are definitely seriously composed.


    Looking at your sentences in #204, I am afraid I have to contradict you. These sentences are interesting, but they are definitely not level A1, in fact, they are -at least- level B1. They deal with several aspects of German grammar which are not easy to grasp and understand. Even a very experienced learner in an advanced learning situation wouldn't be able to really and thoroughly understand the topics you try to deal with in such a short time.


    Please also refer again to Gibson's #97, #99 und my #106 to reflect on your style of learning.


    Please don't misunderstand me: I will gladly and willingly correct all the German sentences you post, as complicated and advanced as they might be. I don't mind at all. But I still believe you are not doing yourself a favour.


    Like Hecuba said, this is of course also just my personal opinion. No offense meant.

    Keep on learning!



    Corrections for #202:

    Ich bin wieder sehr froh, deine Antwort wieder zu sehen.

    Wieder danke ich dir mit für deine mögliche Hilfe.


    Or, easier:

    Ich freue mich wieder (sehr) auf deine Antworten.

    Ich danke dir wieder (sehr) für deine Hilfe. / Danke im Voraus für deine Hilfe.

    #211Author karla13 (1364913)  06 Oct 22, 23:54
    Comment

    Okay, I'll try to make my exercises shorter and easier, and perhaps also not to upload exercises so frequently. :)


    Again, thank you all for the comments and suggestions.

    #212Author azhong (1362382)  07 Oct 22, 06:55
    Comment

    Re #212


    ... and perhaps also not to upload exercises so frequently. :)


    No problem, azhong. For me, it is not the frequency that counts. On the contrary, IMO now is the time to repeat and practice everything you have already learnt. So please feel free to post regularly every day, even with longer exercises Looking forward to it.

    #213Author karla13 (1364913) 07 Oct 22, 08:29
    Comment

    Q: Ist es idiomatisch, statt "dachte" "habe gedacht" zu verwenden? Vielen Dank.

    1. Vor einigen Monaten habe ich ... drei Bücher gekauft, weil ich dachte/ gedacht habe, dass...

    #214Author azhong (1362382) 07 Oct 22, 12:00
    Comment

    Re #214


    Beides ist idiomatisch, und beides ist korrekt. Die Bedeutung ist meiner Meinung nach auch gleich.


    Vielleicht gibt es regionale Unterschiede, aber das weiß ich nicht genau.

    'dachte' ist eher geschriebenes Deutsch (Schriftdeutsch). 'habe gedacht' ist eher umgangssprachlich.


    Aber ich kann es grammatikalisch nicht richtig erklären. Vielleicht schaut manni3 ja mal vorbei...

    #215Author karla13 (1364913) 07 Oct 22, 12:07
    Comment

    #206

    Your English sentences:


    1. Several months ago I picked [or picked out / chose] three books in a bookstore, supposing I'd like all three. 

    More idiomatically: expecting to like all three / thinking that I'd like all three.


    2. So far I've finished reading all of them; unfortunately, only one of them attracts me. 

    Not "so far" -- that means "up to now" and suggests you have not yet finished. E.g. I bought three books, but I've only read one of them so far. You could say "I've already finished reading..."

    You can also say "finished all of them / finished them all", without "reading".

    Not "attracts". I only like one of them.


    3. My neighbor borrowed and read them, too. He said none of them pleased him because all three of the stories were too complicated for him.

    Not "pleased" -- we don't regularly use "to please" like gefallen in German.

    He said he didn't like / didn't enjoy any of them ...


    4. In addition, my sister read the three books, too. She thinks two of them are wonderful.

    To have both "in addition" and "too" is repetitive (tautological).


    5. However, the book that doesn't please her she doesn't like so much is exactly precisely the only one that pleases me I like.

    (I don't know why we say "precisely" and not "exactly" in a case like this.) 


    6. Books, I think then, So I think that books are just like dishes [or "food"]; what attracts one person doesn't always attract someone else.another.

    Not "attracts". What one person likes, another may not ("may not" meaning "will possibly not").

    There are various other ways one could say this. The shortest would be "Tastes differ"!



    ## 209, 210: re: None of my sisters are not cooks.

    Ist der Satz im Englischen denn idiomatisch?

    No, not really. I was just pointing out that If one did say this it would be with "not" rather than "nor".

    #216AuthorHecuba - UK (250280)  07 Oct 22, 16:49
    Comment

    Thank you, Hecuba. And I rewrite the passage again, to memorize it better.


    009 (English, corrected)


    Several months ago I picked up three books in a bookstore, expecting to like them all.

    I've already finished them all; I like only one of them, unfortunately.

    My neighbor also borrowed and read them. He likes none of them because he feels the three stories are all too complicated. 

    My sister also read the books. She thinks two of them are great. However, the one she doesn't like so much is precisely the one I like. 

    So I think books are just like food; what one person likes, another person may not.


    #217Author azhong (1362382) 08 Oct 22, 09:47
    Comment

    Ich habe vor, die englische Sätze ins Deutsche zu übersetzen. Sind sie in Ordnung? Vielen Dank.


    010 (Eng, Uncorrected)

    Mimì and Rodolfo were poor but lived happily. Like the other Sunday mornings, they also went for a walk in the field this Sunday.

    The wind blew through leaves and across the fields. White clouds lay in the blue sky, clear and high.

    Birds sang happily and the river flowed quietly, in which some fish were swimming. Before they went home, they did some jogging along the river.

    #218Author azhong (1362382)  10 Oct 22, 04:59
    Comment

    (Just some quick thoughts, as I have relatives staying with me for a couple of weeks and we have quite a full programme.)


    but lived happily: I don't really like this; it would sound better with something added, e.g. "lived happily together" or even something longer. (One could just say "were poor but happy", but I think that's too much of a cliché,)


    On this Sunday they went for a walk in the fields (not just one field? Or "in the countryside"?), as they did every Sunday. (Or "like they did" ....)


    lay in the blue sky -- perhaps "hung".

    What is clear and high?


    the river flowed quietly (or gently, peacefully), in which ... It's not good to have the verb separating the noun from the which-clause.


    Some other people may have further comments and alternative suggestions.

    #219AuthorHecuba - UK (250280) 11 Oct 22, 11:23
    Comment

    010-1 German

    Einen glücklichen Tag wünsche ich euch alle.


    ▸1. Mimì und Rodolfo waren arm, hatten aber ihre einzige Art, ein Wochenende glücklich zu verbringen/genießen, ohne viel Geld auszugeben. 

    ▸1.1 ... arm, konnten aber ein Wochenende glücklich zu verbringen/genießen, ohne ...

    (Mimì and Rodolfo were poor, but they had their way to spend/enjoy a weekend happily without spending much money.

    #220Author azhong (1362382) 12 Oct 22, 04:42
    Comment

    Satz 1 ist gut so, außer dass es "ihre eigene Art" heißen muss. ("einzige" bedeutet "the only one")


    Satz 2 hat einen Grammatikfehler: .. konnten... verbringen/genießen ohne "zu". Bei Hilfsverben nimmt kein "zu".

    #221Author Gibson (418762) 12 Oct 22, 18:44
    Comment

    (1. Sie waren arm, aber sie hatten ihre eigene Art, ein Wochenende zu genießen.)

    ▸2.1 An diesem Sonntagmorgen gingen sie auf dem Land spazieren, wie sie es oft getan hatte.

    ▸2.2 ...spazieren wie früher.


    (On this Sunday morning they went for a walk in the countryside, as they had often done.

    (...as before.)


    Ich danke für eure Hilfe und wünsche eure alle einen glücklichen Tag.

    #222Author azhong (1362382)  13 Oct 22, 05:22
    Comment

    Beide Sätze sind korrekt (außer dem letzten Wort in 2.1: "hatten"), ich würde sie allerdings kombinieren: "...wie sie es früher oft getan hatten".


    Aber das ist vielleicht Geschmackssache.

    #223Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550)  13 Oct 22, 10:09
    Comment

    Ich würde sagen "... wie sie es schon oft getan hatten" oder einfach "gingen sie wie gewöhnlich auf dem Land spazieren / ...wie es ihre Gewohnheit war".

    #224Author eastworld (238866) 13 Oct 22, 10:45
    Comment

    (1. Das Paar konnte seine Wochenenden glücklich verbringen.

    2. Am diesem Sonntag gingen sie wie gewöhnlich auf dem Land spazieren.)


    3. Winde wehten Blätter durch und über die Felder. Weiße Wolken hängten am blauen Himmel, der Himmel war klar und hoch.

    (Winds blew through leaves and across the fields. White clouds hung in the blue sky; the sky was clear and high.


    Habt einen glücklichen Tag!

    #225Author azhong (1362382) 14 Oct 22, 06:35
    Comment

    Habt einen glücklichen Tag!


    😊 Danke, Du auch!


    Zu 3.:

    • "Der Wind wehte" ("Winde" in der Mehrzahl ist eher sehr poetisch, oder es bezieht sich wirklich auf die verschiedenen Winde, die über einen längeren Zeitraum mal von Süd, mal von Nordost etc. blasen. Das ist übrigens, glaube ich, im Englischen auch so.)
    • "durch und über" scheint mir seltsam, es ist wohl redundant. Ich würde mich auf "über" beschränken, aber "durch" geht auch.
    • "hängten -> hingen". "Hängen" ist eins der schwierigen Wörter mit zwei Vergangenheitsformen: Wenn es um den Zustand geht (wie hier) ist es "hing(en)". Wenn es um eine Aktion geht, heißt es "hängte:" "Ich hängte meinen Mantel an den Haken".
    • "Weiße Wolken hingen" wäre zwar sprachlich korrekt, aber wenn es windig ist, wäre folgendes wahrscheinlicher: "Weiße Wolken trieben am Himmel dahin."


    Der Rest ist gut. Und Du machst große Fortschritte!

    #226Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550)  14 Oct 22, 10:53
    Comment

    #226 Jesse_Pinkman:

    "Der Wind wehte Blätter durch und über die Felder."

    "durch und über" scheint mir seltsam, es ist wohl redundant.


    Me:

    Ich habe vorgehabt, die beide Sätze zu sagen:

    (1.1 Der Wind wehte Blätter durch. (oder

    ?1.1.2 Der Wind durchwehte Blätter.

    1.2 Der Wind wehte über die Felder.


    Wie ist der neue Satz, wo ich ein zweites "wehte" hinzugefügt habe?

    2.1 Der Wind wehte Blätter durch und wehte über die Felder.

    2.2 Der Wind durchwehte Blätter und wehte über die Felder.


    Oder gibt es einen anderen idiomatischer Ausdruck?

    Vielen Dank.

    #227Author azhong (1362382) 14 Oct 22, 12:02
    Comment

    Der Wind wehte durch die Blätter und über die Felder.

    ("durchwehte Blätter" ist nicht falsch, aber sehr literarisch.)

    #228Author eastworld (238866) 14 Oct 22, 12:06
    Comment

    "Durchwehen" existiert nicht.

    Darum sind 1.1.2 und 2.2 nicht korrekt.


    1.1 und 1.2 sind gut.


    2.1 ist nicht idiomatisch. "wehte durch" braucht ein Objekt - durch was? Auch das zweimalige "wehte" klingt nicht gut.


    Edit: Eastworld und ich scheinen uns nicht einig zu sein über "durchwehen". Könntest Du (Eastworld) einen idiomatischen Beispielsatz formulieren?

    #229Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550)  14 Oct 22, 12:07
    Comment

    Der Duden kennt es sogar.

    wehend durch etwas dringen

    BEISPIEL

    • ein frischer Luftzug durchwehte das Haus


    Oder "der Wind durchwehte die Wäsche auf der Leine" ;-) (er geht durch einen "halbdurchlässigen" Gegenstand) (Naja, kein besonders tolles Beispiel)

    #230Author eastworld (238866)  14 Oct 22, 12:13
    Comment

    OK, akzeptiert.

    #231Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 14 Oct 22, 12:17
    Comment

    Also "durch etw.AKK wehen" ist für mich der Ausdruck zu erinnern.

    1. "Etw.AKK durchwehen" is not a separate verb.
    2. Also, the verb "durchwehen" is very literary.


    Vielen Dank!


    #232Author azhong (1362382) 14 Oct 22, 12:24
    Comment

    (Die beide hatten zum Land gegangen, ihre Sonntag zu verbringen. Dort hatten sie das frische Lüftchen gefühlt, der auch über die Bäume geweht hatte.)


    4. Vögel flogen am Himmel, Fisch schwammen im Fluss, und der Fluss floss sanft wie ein weiser Ältester/ Eremit.

    (Birds flew in the sky, fish swam in the river, and the river flowed gently like a wise elder/ hermit.


    Habt ein glückliches Wochenende!

    #233Author azhong (1362382)  15 Oct 22, 06:39
    Comment

    (Die Beiden waren aufs Land gegangen, um dort ihren Sonntag zu verbringen. Dort hatten sie das frische Lüftchen gefühlt, das auch über die Bäume geweht hatte.)


    4. ist in Ordnung (außer: Fische), abgesehen davon, dass das Bild mit dem Ältesten / Eremiten für einen Fluss in der deutschen Kultur sehr ungewöhnlich ist. Wirklich sehr ungewöhnlich.


    Anmerkungen zu den Korrekturen im ersten Satz (dem Satz in Klammern):

    • "die Beiden" ist ein Substantiv und muss darum groß geschrieben werden.
    • "waren: gehen, wie (fast) alle Worte der Bewegung, werden im Perfekt mit "sein" konstruiert.
    • "das": bezieht sich auf "das Lüftchen", und Worte mit den Verkleinerungssilben "-chen" und "-lein" sind immer Neutrum. Du hattest es ja im vorigen Halbsatz auch richtig geschrieben.

    Noch eine kleine Anmerkung: Ein "Lüftchen" ist ein sehr schwacher Wind. Wenn Du das gemeint hast, ist es ok.

    #234Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550)  15 Oct 22, 09:45
    Comment

    Zu #234: "die Beiden" ist ein Substantiv und muss darum groß geschrieben werden.


    Kleine Korrektur der Korrektur:


    "Das Wort beide wird auch in Verbindung mit einem Artikel immer kleingeschrieben: Es waren die beiden dort. [...] Einer von den beiden muss es gewesen sein." (Duden Band 9, 6. Aufl. 2007, s. v. beide)

    #235Author Cro-Mignon (751134)  15 Oct 22, 12:50
    Comment

    Ah, danke.

    #236Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 15 Oct 22, 12:56
    Comment

    Gern. Ich wollte noch den "Hintergrund" dazu aus dem Amtlichen Regelwerk nachtragen:


    "§ 58

    In folgenden Fällen schreibt man Adjektive, Partizipien und Pronomen klein, obwohl sie formale Merkmale der Substantivierung aufweisen.

    [...]

    (4) Pronomen, auch wenn sie als Stellvertreter von Substantiven gebraucht werden, zum Beispiel:

    In diesem Wald hat sich schon mancher verirrt. Ich habe mich mit diesen und jenen unterhalten. Wenn einer eine Reise tut, so kann er was erzählen. Das muss (ein) jeder mit sich selbst ausmachen. Wir haben alles mitgebracht. Sie hatten beides mitgebracht. Man muss mit (den) beiden reden."


    https://grammis.ids-mannheim.de/rechtschreibu...

    #237Author Cro-Mignon (751134) 15 Oct 22, 13:00
    Comment

    #234 Jesse_Pinkman : ...dass das Bild mit dem Ältesten / Eremiten für einen Fluss in der deutschen Kultur sehr ungewöhnlich ist. Wirklich sehr ungewöhnlich.


    Me: Wirklich? Welche Bilder werden dann in der deutschen Kultur für einen sanft fließenden Fluss verwendet?


    (Here I've translated one of the ancient Chinese sayings talking about the wisdom of river. The concept has become a part of the Chinese literature and philosophy. I hope my poor translation is understandable.)


    Confucius observed the river that ran eastward. One of his student asked, "Why do you always observe a river whenever you see it?"


    Confucius replied: "It runs endlessly and to everything universally but as if it has done nothing, which is like a virtue. It runs humbly downwards but always obeys its way, which is like justice. The water is great and never runs out, which is like a principle. It goes to very deep valleys without fear, which is like braveness. It always flatten a place, which is like a law. It is always naturally flat, which is like a norm. It's graceful and can arrive at any tiny place, which is like an investigation. It always set off from the east, which is like a will. It goes in and out and then all things get clean, which is like being capable of educating the others. These are the reasons why."


    Here is the original text in Chinese, without a full-text translation but with word-by-word notes in English.

    #238Author azhong (1362382)  16 Oct 22, 09:26
    Comment

    Sehr interessant, danke.

    Ich habe drei Jahre in China und drei Jahre in Singapore gelebt und empfinde darum diese Gedanken als natürlich für die chinesische Kultur, und sie gefallen mir auch sehr. Aber für die heutige westeuropäische Gesellschaft sind sie eher fremd.


    Zunächst gibt es hier keine "Ältesten" mehr in dem Sinn, dass sie die respektierten Weisen der Gesellschaft wären. Der Eremit zeichnet sich eher dadurch aus, dass er von der Gesellschaft zurückgezogen lebt, nicht unbedingt dadurch dass er sehr weise wäre.


    Und Flüssen werden nur noch selten Persönlichkeiten zugeschrieben.


    Ich schrieb oben: in der heutigen Gesellschaft. Früher, vor 2000 Jahren oder noch davor, war das auch hier alles anders. Die Flüsse wurden, wie alle Naturgewalten, noch mit Göttern assoziiert und hatten Persönlichkeiten. Das hat sich vor allem durch das Christentum geändert.


    Die "Ältesten eines Dorfes" gab es auch später noch; ich kann nicht sagen, wann es war, dass sie durch die "Lautesten eines Dorfes" abgelöst wurden.


    (Please let me know if you understand what I wrote. I wrote it in German as an exercise for you, but would be happy to translate it to English if you wish.)


    Wie würde man das Fließen des Flusses in Deutschland beschreiben? Am nächsten käme der chinesischen Idee vielleicht eine poetische Beschreibung wie: "Der Fluss floss in seiner gewohnten Ruhe dem Meer entgegen, unberührt von den kurzlebigen (short-lived) Wirrungen (turmoil) der Welt".

    #239Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550)  16 Oct 22, 10:35
    Comment

    @ die "Lautesten eines Dorfes" - da ist ein Ironie-Smiley angebracht, sonst wirds missverständlich. Dorfschulzen und Bürgermeister sind nicht notwendigerweise die Lautesten in einer Dorf- oder Stadtgemeinschaft.

    #240Author manni3 (305129)  16 Oct 22, 11:42
    Comment

    Ja, das ist wahr.

    #241Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 16 Oct 22, 12:49
    Comment
    Zum Fluss und den hier genannten Bildern: Mich irritiert gar nicht der Vergleich eines Flusses mit einem Ältesten - immerhin lebe ich am Vater Rhein, und wer "Die Flüsse von London" kennt, weiß auch, dass personifizierte Flüsse immer noch im Trend liegen -, sondern die Aussage, dass der Fluss "wie ein Ältester fließt". Darunter kann ich mir gar nichts vorstellen.
    #242Author fehlerTeufel (1317098) 16 Oct 22, 15:13
    Comment

    #239 Jesse: (Please let me know if you understand what I wrote. I wrote it in German as an exercise for you, but would be happy to translate it to English if you wish.)


    Me: Please need not worry about my understanding, nor spend extra time making notes in English for me. You all have helped me quite a lot. The Google Translate is powerful enough. Actually it has been helping my sentence-making, too. I'm very glad to study your German sentences and learn some expressions from them. I can understand all your explanations well so far, if not regarding the cultural part like Rhenus Pater ("Vater Rhein") or "Die Flüsse von London" that fehlerTeufel mentioned. But it's okay for me. I'm focusing on grammatical and idiomatical expressions.


    I'll ask actively if there is anything I can't understand. Once again, thank you all.

    #243Author azhong (1362382)  17 Oct 22, 07:20
    Comment

    (Eine der Arten von Mimì und Rodolfo, ein glückliches Wochenende zu verbringen, ist auf dem Land spazieren zu gehen. An diesem Sonntag sind sie auch gegangen. Dort haben sie die frische Luft genossen, und die Bäume, die Wolke und den Fluss angesehen.)

    ▸5. Bevor sie nach Hause gegangen waren, waren sie mal den Fluss entlang gejoggt.

    (Before they went home, they did some jogging along the river.)


    (~Das Ende dieses Artikel~)

    #244Author azhong (1362382) 17 Oct 22, 11:55
    Comment

    011 (Unkorrigiert)

    Einen glücklichen Tag wünsche ich euch alle.


    1. A: Ich weiß nicht, wer der Mann dort/da drüben ist.

    2. B: Er wird unser neue Bürgermeister sein.

    3. A: Ich weiß nicht, worüber er spricht/redet.

    4. B: Er spricht darüber, dass er ein guter Bürgermeister sein wird.

    5. A: Hat er sonst noch gesprochen?

    6. B: Er hat auch über seine Vergangenheit gesprochen, was aber nicht stimmt. Ich weiß über seine Vergangenheit Bescheid.

    7. A: Das weiß ich doch, dass alle Politiker mehr oder weniger lügen. Warum weißt du übrigens über ihre Vergangenheit Bescheid?

    8. B: Ich bin seiner Bruder.

    #245Author azhong (1362382)  18 Oct 22, 04:16
    Comment

    2. unser neuer Bürgermeister

    5. I presume you meant "What else did he say" --> Was hat er sonst noch gesagt?

    8. ich bin sein Bruder

    #246Author penguin (236245) 18 Oct 22, 10:42
    Comment

    Aus dem Kontext wird klar:

    7 A Warum weißt du übrigens über ihre seine Vergangenheit Bescheid?

    8 B Ich bin sein Bruder.

    #247Author manni3 (305129) 18 Oct 22, 10:55
    Comment

    Vielen Dank für eure Korrekturen. Eine Frage bitte: Gibt es eine weitere sprachliche Ausdrucksvariante zum Satz? (I mean, is there an expression where I can grammatically separate "wo" and "über", maybe less natural though?)


    Ich weiß nicht, worüber er spricht.

    Vielleicht etwas wie

    ? Ich weiß nicht, über was er spricht.


    Ich danke euch im Voraus für eure Antworten.

    #248Author azhong (1362382) 19 Oct 22, 10:16
    Comment

    Er hat auch über seine Vergangenheit gesprochen, was aber nicht stimmt. 


    That would meant that it's not true that he spoke about his past (which would make no sense) - "was" refers to the whole first part of the sentence. You mean


    Er hat auch über seine Vergangenheit gesprochen, aber er hat gelogen/ aber er was er sagte, stimmt nicht.

    #249Author Gibson (418762) 19 Oct 22, 11:20
    Comment

    #249 Gibson: 1. Er hat auch über seine Vergangenheit gesprochen, aber er was er sagte, stimmt nicht.


    Me: Thank you. The underlined sentence construction, however, is strange to me. Could you please explain for me, if it's possible to explain? Or could you please show me some more sentences with the same construction?


    Aber er was er sagte, stimmt nicht.

    (But what he said is not correct.)


    AFAIK:

    1. Aber sie (=seine Worte) stimmt nicht.

    (But his words are not correct.)

    2. Aber was er gesagt hat, ist nicht richtig.

    (But what he said is not correct.)

    3 Aber er stimmt nicht.

    (But he is not correct.)

    #250Author azhong (1362382) 19 Oct 22, 12:40
    Comment

    Sorry, that was just a typo. It should only be one "er" (the second).


    AFAIK:

    1. Aber sie (=seine Worte) stimmt nicht.

    (But his words are not correct.)

    2. Aber was er gesagt hat, ist nicht richtig.

    (But what he said is not correct.)

    3 Aber er stimmt nicht.

    (But he is not correct.)

     

    1) Aber sie stimmten nicht (Plural) - not really. Not sure it's actually wrong, but it's not idiomatic IMO.

    2) - fine

    3) - not possible. Only things can "stimmen", not people.


    I think "stimmen" usually refers to a concrete fact, which is why the first sentence sounds odd. Typical is something like:


    Er hat gesagt, er wäre in Armut aufgewachsen, aber das stimmt nicht.

    #251Author Gibson (418762)  19 Oct 22, 12:53
    Comment

    @ 251 - Im letzten Beispielsatz würde ich den Konjunktiv I für die indirekte Rede vorschlagen:

    Er hat gesagt, er sei in Armut aufgewachsen, aber das stimmt nicht.

    #252Author manni3 (305129)  19 Oct 22, 15:29
    Comment

    Das nehme ich gerne an; ich gehöre leider zu den Leuten, die K I und K II regelmäßig durcheinanderwerfen.

    #253Author Gibson (418762) 19 Oct 22, 18:26
    Comment

    edit: Wieder gelöscht

    #254Author manni3 (305129)  20 Oct 22, 09:33
    Comment

    012-1

    Vielen Dank für eure Hilfe. Einen zufriedenen Tag wünsche ich euch.


    1. Ich wohne jetzt in einem Haus, wo es keines Fließendwasser gibt.

    2. Das ist nicht, weil ich in Armut aufgewachsen und mich schon daran gewöhnt habe.

    3. Ich bin nicht so arm, obwohl ich auf der anderen Seite auch nicht sehr reich bin.

    4. Das ist eher wie eine Lebensentscheidung, eine kleine. 


    (1. I am now living in a house where there is no running water. 

    2. It's not because I grew up in poverty and have been used to it. 

    3. I'm also not that poor, although I am not very rich on the other hand.

    4. It's more like a life decision, a small one.)

    #255Author azhong (1362382) 21 Oct 22, 04:56
    Comment

    1. Ich wohne jetzt in einem Haus, wo es keines kein Fließendwasser gibt.

    2. Das ist nicht, weil ich in Armut aufgewachsen und mich schon daran gewöhnt habe.

    3. Ich bin nicht so arm, obwohl ich auf der anderen Seite /andererseits auch nicht sehr reich bin.

    4. Das ist eher wie eine Lebensentscheidung, eine kleine.


    Anmerkungen:

    2, 3, 4 sind korrekt.

    @ 1 - "kein" folgt der Deklination von "ein": das Wasser, ein Wasser (im Nominativ und Akkusativ)

    @ 3 - "auf der anderen Seite" ist korrekt. Die Alternative "andererseits" finde ich etwas eleganter.

    #256Author manni3 (305129)  21 Oct 22, 16:08
    Comment

    Hm, ich finde weder "das ist nicht" noch "Lebensentscheidung" so arg idiomatisch.

    #257Author Gibson (418762) 21 Oct 22, 16:27
    Comment

    Nachtrag

    Korrektur zu 2: Das ist nicht, weil ich in Armut aufgewachsen bin und mich schon daran gewöhnt habe.

    #258Author manni3 (305129)  21 Oct 22, 16:38
    Comment

    #257 Gibson: ich finde weder "das ist nicht" noch "Lebensentscheidung" so arg idiomatisch.


    Me: Let's ignore the latter and just discuss the former, which I think should be more basic and thus fits my level.

    Q: How would you modify "das ist nicht"?

    1. Ich wohne jetzt in einem Haus, wo es kein Fließendwasser gibt.

    2. Das ist nicht, weil ich in Armut aufgewachsen bin und mich schon daran gewöhnt habe.


    Vielen Dank.

    #259Author azhong (1362382) 22 Oct 22, 08:35
    Comment
    • Der Grund dafür ist nicht, dass...
    • Das liegt nicht daran, dass... (sehr idiomatisch!)
    #260Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550)  22 Oct 22, 08:37
    Comment

    012-2

    Einen zufriedenen Tag wünsche ich euch alle.


    1. Fast an jedem Morgen/ jeden Morgen trage ich Wasser bei Eimer aus einem Bach, der nicht weit weg liegt.

    2. Das Wasser, das ich nach Hause mitnehme, lagere ich in der Badewanne und zwei großen Wannen, eine in der Küche und die andere im Vorgarten.


    (1. Almost every morning I draw water with buckets from a brook, which is not far away.

    2. I store the water I carry home in the bathtub and two big tubs, one in the kitchen and the other in the front yard.

    #261Author azhong (1362382) 22 Oct 22, 10:26
    Comment
    Korrektur des 1. Satzes: statt "bei Eimer" muss es "mit/in Eimern" heißen.
    #262Author fehlerTeufel (1317098)  22 Oct 22, 19:23
    Comment

    Weitere Korrektur des 1. Satzes: ... hole ich Wasser ...

    #263Author manni3 (305129) 22 Oct 22, 21:06
    Comment

    Almost every morning I fetch water with buckets from a brook which/that is not far away (or: nearby) - no comma after 'brook' in English.

    #264Author Gibson (418762) 22 Oct 22, 21:19
    Comment

    Ich hatte es so im Gedächtnis, dass vor "which" ein Komma steht, vor "that" aber nicht.

    #265Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 22 Oct 22, 22:02
    Comment

    Jein - das Komma hängt davon ab, ob es ein defining oder non-defining Nebensatz ist. In BE kann man "which" für beides verwenden, also je nach Fall mit oder ohne Komma. In AE wird meines Wissens beim defining nur "that" verwendet, deshalb steht "which" immer mit Komma, weil es immer eine non-defining Erweiterung ist.

    #266Author Gibson (418762)  23 Oct 22, 00:17
    Comment

    Ich (kann kein Englisch, aber ich) erinnere mich an lebhafte Diskussionen.

    Deshalb hab ich nachgeschaut und fand bei https://www.grammarly.com/blog/comma-before-which/ :


    Commas can be tricky, but they don’t have to trip you up.

    • Use a comma before which when it introduces a nonrestrictive phrase.
    • Don’t use a comma before which when it’s part of a prepositional phrase, such as “in which.”
    • Don’t use a comma before which when it introduces an indirect question.

     

    #267Author manni3 (305129)  23 Oct 22, 09:58
    Comment

    Gibson: (1). das Komma hängt davon ab, ob es ein defining oder non-defining Nebensatz ist.

    (2). In BE kann man "which" für beides verwenden, also je nach Fall mit oder ohne Komma.

    (3). In AE wird meines Wissens beim defining nur "that" verwendet, deshalb steht "which" immer mit Komma, weil es immer eine non-defining Erweiterung ist.


    Me:

    (1) is correct. It's exactly the rule to decide whether or not a comma should be used before a relative pronoun.

    However, (3) is a bit different from what I've known, so I asked and received a comment here. In short, both the sentences are grammatical and have the same meaning:

    1. He gave me a gift that I appreciated.
    2. He gave me a gift which I appreciated.

    The only difference is that it sounds more formal to use "which" in restrictive relative clauses (like in 2.) So the rule Gibson said actually also works and is followed by some native speakers.

    #268Author azhong (1362382) 23 Oct 22, 12:02
    Comment

    #267 Manni3:

    • 2) Don’t use a comma before which when it’s part of a prepositional phrase, such as “in which.”
    • 3) Don’t use a comma before which when it introduces an indirect question.

    Me:

    2) z.B. (from that webpage):

    (x)1.1 We heard three speeches, the longest of, which went for an hour.

    (O)1.2 We heard three speeches, the longest of which went for an hour.


    (x)2.1 The envelope in, which the letter arrived had no return address.

    (O)2.2 The envelope in which the letter arrived had no return address.


    (x)3.1 The platform on, which we built our program is very stable.

    (O)3.2 The platform on which we built our program is very stable.


    I think this is obvious because the underlined words together is a phrase. If you want to add a comma to show it's a non-restrictive clause, the comma should be added before the phrase, like in 1.2.


    3) Don’t use a comma before which when it introduces an indirect question. z.B.

    (X)4.1 I asked Sam, which bus I should take.

    (O)4.2 I asked Sam which bus I should take.


    This "which" is not a relative pronoun; it's a determiner, just like "this", "that", "these" or "those". The usage is unrelated to the previous discussion between Gibson and Jesse.

    #269Author azhong (1362382)  23 Oct 22, 12:14
    Comment

    In short, both the sentences are grammatical and have the same meaning:


    I never said anything different - in fact, that's what I said in #266. What I said is that, as far as I've gleaned from the AE speakers here on LEO, is that in AE you normally don't use "which" with defining relative clauses.


    So the rule Gibson said actually also works and is followed by some native speakers.

    Of course it works, that's why I gave it. I will stop answering in your threads. As I said before, I often find them confusing and hard work, and if you don't even believe me (or don't understand what I explain?) I might as well save myself the trouble.

    #270Author Gibson (418762) 23 Oct 22, 12:21
    Comment

    It's possible that me or Google Translate has misunderstood your sentences, Gibson. What I've understood is that you said the relative subclaus

    "... which..." (without a comma)

    is ungrammatical in AE. I was just to make sure if that is true. (But it's not. Some AE speakers DO use "which" with defining/restrictive relative clauses. And BTW I'm not AE; I am a Taiwanese. :)


    Gibson, it's okay if you decide not to provide any help. But please try to revise your negative thinking. It's a mistake out of your wrong imagination. There is NO distrust on you or on any person in this thread; it's all the way just discussions in languages.


    If you can spend some time reading my question post (which is just before the previous linked post), you'll find my motivation is not that bad.

    #271Author azhong (1362382)  23 Oct 22, 13:11
    Comment

    #272 - Ich finde den Tonfall von Azhongs Wortbeiträgen überhaupt nicht als unfreundlich, kann im Gegenteil seine Haltung absolut nachvollziehen, die er ganz sachlich darlegt. Manchmal will man eben verstärkt am Original lernen und zeitaufwändiges Chatten irgendwann einfach mal abbrechen, auch wenn man gar nichts gegen die Person hat, mit der man bis dahin schon viel gechattet hat.

    #273Author RightSaidFred (1322814) 24 Oct 22, 21:16
    Comment

    Re #273 RightSaidFred:


    In Engish: Nice to meet you for the first time, RightSaidFred. I guess your response is unrelated to my language-learning, so please allow my impoliteness to skip reading it. 


    (Actually I neither read nor respond any post unrelated to my language-learning. My impoliteness is not especially on you; this thread is built for language-learning, if you do not know it yet. I appreciate if you can come and provide your help sometimes.)


    In German (translated by Google): Schön, Sie zum ersten Mal zu treffen, RightSaidFred. Ich denke, Ihre Antwort hat nichts mit meinem Sprachenlernen zu tun, also erlauben Sie bitte meiner Unhöflichkeit, das Lesen zu überspringen.


    (Eigentlich lese oder beantworte ich keine Posts, die nichts mit meinem Sprachenlernen zu tun haben. Meine Unhöflichkeit betrifft nicht Sie; dieser Thread ist für das Sprachenlernen gedacht, falls Sie ihn noch nicht kennen. Ich freue mich, wenn Sie kommen und Ihren Beitrag leisten können manchmal helfen.) 

    #274Author azhong (1362382) 25 Oct 22, 03:47
    Comment

    To share a knowledge in English:

    Almost every morning I draw/fetch water with buckets from a brook...


    "draw" refers solely to the process of lifting water with buckets whereas

    "fetch" is the entire process of drawing the water and bringing it to the destination where it will be used.


    It's summarized from the comment of a USAmerican. (Again, I'm just sharing linguistic knowledges in English in return to your help in German.)


    And then I have a corresponding question in German:

    Q: to fetch water = Wasser holen?

    to draw water = Wasser ziehen?


    Vielen Dank für eure Antworten.

    #275Author azhong (1362382)  25 Oct 22, 03:56
    Comment

    to fetch water = Wasser holen

    to draw water = Wasser (mit dem Eimer/der Kelle/dem Krug) schöpfen

    #276Author fehlerTeufel (1317098) 25 Oct 22, 11:48
    Comment

    013

    謝謝("danken/ Dank")。Einen zufriedenen Tag wünsche ich euch alle.


    ●(Sätze bilden) ÄÖÜ „ “ äöüß★▼▸

    1. Kellen können benutzt werden, Suppe zu schöpfen, können Messer aber nicht.

    (Ladles can be used to scoop soup, but knives cannot. 


    2.1 Am Teich schöpfte ich mit den hohlen Händen etwas Wasser aus und wusch mir das Gesicht. 

    2.2 Am Teich schöpfte ich mir mit den hohlen Händen etwas Wasser aus und wusch das Gesicht. 


    Q: Welche Stellung "mir" ist besser?

    (At the pond I scooped up some water in my cupped hands and washed my face.)


    #277Author azhong (1362382)  26 Oct 22, 05:34
    Comment
    Das "mir" im zweiten Beispiel passt an beiden Stellen gut. Aber du brauchst kein "aus":
    Am Teich schöpfte ich etwas Wasser und wusch mir das Gesicht.

    Das erste Beispiel ist etwas schief, weil für den zweiten Teilsatz die Zuordnung zum Objekt nicht ganz passt. Du brauchst noch ein "das":

    Kellen können benutzt werden um Suppe zu schöpfen, Messer können das nicht.
    #278Author grinsessa (1265817)  26 Oct 22, 09:58
    Comment

    #277

    1. Kellen können benutzt werden, um Suppe zu schöpfen, können Messer aber nicht.

    (Ladles can be used to scoop soup, but knives cannot. 


    2.1 Am Teich schöpfte ich mit den hohlen Händen etwas Wasser aus und wusch mir das Gesicht. 

    2.2 Am Teich schöpfte ich mir mit den hohlen Händen etwas Wasser aus und wusch das mein Gesicht. 

    (Ansonsten könnte es auch das Gesicht einer anderen Person sein. Ich halte Satz 2.1 für idiomatischer.)


    Alternativvorschlag: Ich schöpfte mit den hohlen Händen etwas Wasser aus dem Teich und wusch mir das Gesicht.


    Q: Welche Stellung von "mir" ist besser?

    #279Author fehlerTeufel (1317098) 26 Oct 22, 10:32
    Comment

    014

    謝謝("danken/Dank")。

    Einen frohen Tag wünsche ich euch allen.


    ▸1. Tief im Wald beim Fluss hat es ein altes Haus gestanden.

    ▸2. Dort habe ein Paar gelebt mit ihren drei Kindern, die zwei Junge und das jüngste Mädchen waren.

    ▸3. Alle drei Kinder mussten jeden Tag helfen, Wasser und trockenes Feuerholz zu sammeln.


    (1. Deep in the forest by a river stood an old house.

    2. There lived a couple and their three children, two boys and the youngest girl.

    3. Every day all the kids had to help collect/gather water and dry firewood.

    #280Author azhong (1362382)  27 Oct 22, 09:24
    Comment

    Hilfe zur Selbsthilfe zum 2. Satz:


    Auf welches Subjekt bezieht sich haben? In welcher Person muss es stehen?


    In welcher Zeit soll das Verb stehen? Aktuell "habe" - Konditional?


    Plural von Junge?


    Allgemein: Im Deutschen würde man wie im Englischen keinen Relativsatz bilden, sondern einen Einschub:

    ...drei Kindern, zwei [Plural von Junge] und ein Mädchen.


    Wenn man unbedingt betonen möchte, dass das Mädchen das Jüngste der Kinder war, kann man einen weiteren Einschub bilden

    ...drei Kindern, zwei [Plural von Junge] und ein Mädchen, die Jüngste.

    oder man verlängert den Satz bzw baut noch einen an:

    ...drei Kindern, die beiden älteren waren [Plural von Junge], das jüngste ein Mädchen.

    Das ist aber nicht sehr elegant. Vielleicht fällt mir später noch etwas besseres ein. "Das jüngste Mädchen" wie in deinem Versuch funktioniert nicht, weil man dann erwartet, dass es noch irgendwo ältere Mädchen gibt.


    #281Author grinsessa (1265817) 27 Oct 22, 09:38
    Comment

    *2. Dort habe ein Paar gelebt mit ihren drei Kindern, die zwei Junge und das jüngste Mädchen waren.


    Okay. What I have got:

    1. The relative pronoun plural "die" is improper. Here the subject should be "das Paar", a single noun.

    2. "Habe gelebt" ≠ colloquial "lebte" (the past tense) here. “Haben gelebt” sounds like the family are still living there?

    3. Der Junge; pl: die Jungen.


    Thus, so far it should be revised as

    ? 2.1 Dort lebte ein Paar mit ihren drei Kindern, das arm war.

    (...lived a couple ..., who(=the couple) were poor.)

    2.2 Dort lebte ein Paar mit ihren drei Kindern, zwei Jungen und ein Mädchen, die* jüngste.

    (...three children, two boys.NOM and one girl.NOM, the.F youngest.

    [*] "Die" here refers to "das Mädchen". (We've discussed this usage in #115, where manni3 quoted Duden 9:


    "Wenn das Pronomen direkt oder nach kurzem Abstand folgt, ist es das Mädchen - es/das. Das ist immer bei Relativsätzen der Fall: 

    Das Mächen, das in eine neue Schule kam ...


    Wenn dazwischen ein etwas größerer Text steht, wechselt das Pronomen vom grammatisch korrekten "es" zum natürlichen "sie".

    Beispiel aus Duden 9:

    Das Mächen fand rasch neue Freundinnen. Besonders bemühte sie sich um ihre Tischnachbarin."


    (To be continued...)

    #282Author azhong (1362382)  27 Oct 22, 10:43
    Comment

    (Continuing)

    Or by starting another clause

    2.3 Dort lebte ein Paar mit drei kindern, die beiden älteren [Kinder] waren Jungen and das jüngste [Kind] [war] ein Mädchen.

    (There lived a couple with three children; the elder two were boys and the youngest [was] a girl.)


    Is there anything wrong in my three sentences (2.1-2.3) and my understandings? Thank you.

    #283Author azhong (1362382)  27 Oct 22, 10:55
    Comment

    Da gab es eine Überschneidung, bezieht sich auf #283:

    Für mich hört sich für den Einschub "die Jüngste" idiomatischer an, ich kann dir aber nicht erklären, warum.


    Für den ersten Teil des Satzes ist Perfekt ok, allerdings ist, wie du erkannt hast, "das Paar" Singular, also richtig:

    Das Paar hat gelebt. Perfekt


    Das Paar habe gelebt. Konditional. Das würde man in der indirekten Rede verwenden, zum Beispiel in einem Zeitungsartikel verwenden, wenn eine längere Zeugenaussage wiedergegeben wird:

    Zeugen berichten, dass ihnen das Haus schon länger verdächtig vorkam. Dort habe ein Paar gelebt, das....


    Wenn du einfach nur eine Geschichte in der Vergangenheitsform erzähen willst, musst du Perfekt (hat gelebt) oder schriftsprachlich Präteritum verwenden (lebte).


    #284: Jetzt klingt der Satz gut.


    #284Author grinsessa (1265817)  27 Oct 22, 10:58
    Comment

    Thank you. Now it's my effort to memorize your correction.


    Also, just FYI, I've received some comments here on the second English sentence. In short, my original expression is inaccurate, and these expressions are correct:


    ...a couple with three children, two boys and a girl, the youngest. (you have mentioned this one in German. "A girl" is better than "one girl")

    ...three children: two boys and a girl, the youngest. (":")

    ...three children, two boys and the youngest - a girl.

    ▸(less better but still grammatical): ...three children, two boys and the youngest a girl.

    #285Author azhong (1362382)  27 Oct 22, 11:29
    Comment

    015

    Einen frohen Tag wünsche ich euch allen.


    ▸1. Wann ich am Fluss Wasser hole, sehe ich manchmal Schlange. 

    ▸2. Für mich sehen schlangen schrecklich aus, mich immer sie erschrecken.

    ▸3. Allerdings glaube ich, dass ich sie auch erschrecke, vielleicht sogar noch mehr.

    ▸ 4. Ich habe versucht, mich mit ihnen anzufreuden, was ist aber fast ummöglich.

    ▸5. Ich glaube, sie nie wissen werden, dass ich sie überhaupt nicht verletzen will. 

    ▸6. Ich gehe gerade nur hin, Wasser zu sammeln.


    #286Author azhong (1362382) 28 Oct 22, 06:31
    Comment

    ▸1. Wenn ich am Fluss Wasser hole, sehe ich manchmal eine Schlange / sehe ich manchmal Schlangen

    ▸2. Für mich sehen Schlangen schrecklich aus, mich immer sie erschrecken sie erschrecken mich immer.

    ▸3. Allerdings glaube ich, dass ich sie auch erschrecke, vielleicht sogar noch mehr.

    ▸ 4. Ich habe versucht, mich mit ihnen anzufreunden, was ist aber fast unmöglich ist.

    ▸5. Ich glaube, sie werden nie wissen werden, dass ich sie überhaupt nicht verletzen will. 

    (Nicht wirklich idiomatisch. Besser wäre: Ich glaube, sie wissen (gar) nicht, dass ich sie überhaupt nicht verletzen will.

    ▸6. Ich gehe gerade nur hin, Wasser zu sammeln. - Der Satz ist unklar. Bitte das englische Original einstellen.

    #287Author fehlerTeufel (1317098) 28 Oct 22, 13:21
    Comment

    #287: ▸6. Ich gehe gerade nur hin, Wasser zu sammeln.

    - Der Satz ist unklar. Bitte das englische Original einstellen.


    Me: (Ich danke dir für deine weitere Korrektur.)

    Das englische Original:

    I just go there(=go to the river) to collect water.

    • hingehen: go there
    • gerade nur: just only, just

    Vielleicht soll es,

    ?Ich gehe gerade nur hin, um Wasser zu sammeln.

    #288Author azhong (1362382) 29 Oct 22, 03:10
    Comment

    #287: ▸2. Für mich sehen Schlangen schrecklich aus, mich immer sie erschrecken sie erschrecken mich immer.


    Q: Wie ist die Wortstellung?

    Für mich sehen Schlangen schrecklich aus, mich erschrecken sie immer.


    Betont die Stellung "mich" richtig oder ist sie einfach weniger idiomatisch als "sie erschrecken mich immer"?

    (Does the order give an proper emphasize on "mich", or is it just less idiomatic than "sie erschrecken mich immer"?)


    Vielen Dank für deine Antwort.

    #289Author azhong (1362382)  29 Oct 22, 03:54
    Comment

    #288 Ich gehe gerade nur hin, Wasser zu sammeln. / Ich gehe gerade nur hin, um Wasser zu sammeln.

    = Ich gehe nur hin, um Wasser zu holen.

    Alternativ: Ich gehe nur dann hin, wenn ich Wasser holen muss.


    "Gerade" für sich genommen passt in den Satz nicht hinein. Das klingt so, als würde man "jetzt gerade mal kurz" hingehen. Aber das ist ja nicht die Aussage.

    Mein Alternativvorschlag verstärkt durch "dann - wenn" die Aussage, dass a) es widerwillig geschieht und b) tatsächlich nur in dieser besonderen Situation.

    Wasser "sammeln" ist in diesem Satz nicht idiomatisch. Ich "hole" Wasser am/aus dem Fluss und "sammle" es zu Hause in einem großen Behälter. Der Vorgang, der hier gemeint ist, wir mit "holen" oder "schöpfen" ausgedrückt.


    #289 "Sie erschrecken mich immer" ist eine allgemeingültige Aussage.

    Die Wortstellung "Mich erschrecken sie immer" lässt vermuten, dass ein Vergleich angestellt wird, etwa so: "Mich erschrecken sie immer, meinen Bruder aber nicht." Oder: "Du hast vielleicht keine Angst vor Schlagen, aber mich erschrecken sie immer." Die Betonung liegt also auf "mich", wie du schon richtig vermutet hast.




    #290Author fehlerTeufel (1317098) 29 Oct 22, 12:38
    Comment

    #288:

    I just go there(=go to the river) to collect water.

    • hingehen: go there
    • gerade nur: just only, just

    Two things:

    (a) it's not normal to say "just only".

    (b) You don't "collect" water. (A scientist might collect samples of water in order to analyse them.)

    I would say "to get water".


    When you say "I just go there to [get] water", I understand this to mean that you go there for this purpose, not for any other reason ("just" meaning "only").

    #291AuthorHecuba - UK (250280) 29 Oct 22, 13:02
    Comment

    #289 -

    1. Für mich sehen Schlangen schrecklich aus, sie erschrecken mich immer.

    2. Für mich sehen Schlangen schrecklich aus, mich erschrecken sie immer.


    1 halte ich für deutlich üblicher, 2 betont im gegebenen Kontext das "mich" auf eindrucksvolle, elegante Weise.

    #292Author RightSaidFred (1322814) 29 Oct 22, 14:02
    Comment

    #290 fehlerTeufel: Mein Alternativvorschlag verstärkt durch "dann - wenn" die Aussage, dass a) es widerwillig geschieht und b) tatsächlich nur in dieser besonderen Situation.


    Q: Sind die Ausdrücke in Ordnung? Vielen Dank.

    1.1. Ich rufe nur dich an, um zu sagen, dass ich dich liebe.

    1.2. Ich telefoniere nur, um zu sagen, dass ich dich liebe.

    2.1. Ich rufe nur dann dich an, wenn ich sage möchte, dass ich dich liebe.

    2.2. Ich telefoniere nur dann, wenn ich sage möchte, dass ich dich liebe.

    (I'm just calling to say I love you.


    (Or does the "wenn-dann" structure doesn't fit the sentence well because it implies "widerwillig geschieht" (reluctantly occurred)?)

    #293Author azhong (1362382)  29 Oct 22, 14:06
    Comment

    1.1. Ich rufe nur dich an, um zu sagen, dass ich dich liebe.

    1.2. Ich telefoniere nur, eher: Ich rufe dich nur an, um dir zu sagen, dass ich dich liebe.

    mögliche Kurzfassung: Ich rufe nur an, um zu sagen, dass ich dich liebe.

    direkt Rede ginge auch: Ich rufe nur an um dir zu sagen: "Ich liebe dich."

    2.1. Ich rufe nur dann dich an, wenn ich sage möchte, dass ich dich liebe.

    2.2. Ich telefoniere nur dann, wenn ich sagen möchte, dass ich dich liebe.


    Nur Satz 2 scheint mir im gegebenen Kontext idiomatisch. 1 klingt so, als wenn man es eigentlich einer ganzen Reihe anderer auch mitteilen könnte, was mir in der Form extrem unnatürlich vorkommt. die anderen beiden Sätze klingen abwegig bzw. zu kompliziert.

    #294Author RightSaidFred (1322814)  29 Oct 22, 14:35
    Comment

    #293 The continuous/progressive I'm just calling fits 1.1 and 1.2 but not 2.1 and 2.2.

    #295AuthorHecuba - UK (250280) 29 Oct 22, 15:02
    Comment

    #293

    1.1. Ich rufe nur dich an, um zu sagen, dass ich dich liebe.


    Das bedeutet, dass der Anrufer nur diese eine Person anruft, sonst niemanden. Du meinst eher:

    Ich rufe (dich) nur an, um (dir) zu sagen, dass ich dich liebe.


    1.2. Ich telefoniere nur, um zu sagen, dass ich dich liebe.

    Das geht, klingt aber ein bisschen holprig. "Telefonieren" kann bedeuten, dass die andere Person angerufen hat. In diesem Fall geht es aber ausdrücklich um "anrufen".


    2.1. Ich rufe nur dann dich an, wenn ich sage möchte, dass ich dich liebe.

    Ich rufe dich nur dann an, wenn ich (dir) sagen möchte, dass ich dich liebe. (Das würde bedeuten, dass er/sie nur dann anruft, zu keinem anderen Zeitpunkt.)


    2.2. Ich telefoniere nur dann, wenn ich sagen möchte, dass ich dich liebe.

    (Siehe meinen Kommentar zu 1.2)


    Der Satz in 1.1. ist am idiomatischsten.

    Die Verstärkung mit "wenn - dann", die ich in #290 vorgeschlagen hat, gilt für alle Handlungen, die nur "dann" passieren, "wenn" eine bestimmte Voraussetzung gegeben ist.

    1. Ich gehe nur dann Wasser holen, wenn ich muss. (Ich muss Wasser holen, weil ich keins mehr habe.)

    2. Ich rufe dich nur dann an, wenn ich dir sagen will, dass ich dich liebe. (Ich rufe dich zu keinem anderen Zeitpunkt an. Der Grund für meinen Anruf ist, dass ich dir sagen will, dass ich dich liebe.)

    Die Handlung muss nicht unbedingt widerstrebend ausgeführt werden. Das kommt ganz auf den Satzinhalt an.


    #296Author fehlerTeufel (1317098) 29 Oct 22, 18:16
    Comment

    016

    Vielen Dank. Einen zufriedenen Tag wünsche ich euch allen.


    ▸1. Ich habe gesagt, dass ich nach den Fluss nur dann hingehe, wenn ich brauche, Wasser zu holen.

    ▸2. Das stimmt aber nicht vollständig.

    ▸3. Manchmal gehe ich dort hin, um zu schwimmen, zu joggen, oder nur zu spazieren gehen und die abendliche Kühle des Sommers zu genießen.


    (I've said that I go to the river only when I need to fetch water.

    However, it's not completely correct.

    Sometimes I go there for swimming, for jogging, or for a walk enjoying the evening/vespertine cool of summer.)

    #297Author azhong (1362382)  30 Oct 22, 10:52
    Comment

    Na, guten Morgen, azhong!

    Da haben wir ja fast die ersten 300 Beiträge voll! :-)


    notwendige Korrekturen:

    Ich habe gesagt, dass ich nach dem zum Fluss nur dann (hin)gehe, wenn ich Wasser holen muss.

    "brauchen" im Sinne von "müssen" in Verbindung mit Verben gibt es nur in negativen Wendungen:

    Also zum Beispiel: Das brauchst du nicht zu tun. (Das brauchst du tun. ist falsch. Es muss heißen: Das musst du tun.)


    Das stimmt aber nicht vollständig. Der Satz ist korrekt, ich würde sagen, ich denke fast alle würden aber eher sagen: ganz.

    Manchmal gehe ich dort hin, um zu schwimmen, zu joggen, oder um zu spazieren zu gehen und die abendliche Kühle des Sommers zu genießen.

    #298Author RightSaidFred (1322814) 30 Oct 22, 13:55
    Comment

    #298 RightSiadFred: Ich habe gesagt, dass ich zum Fluss nur dann gehe, wenn ich brauche, Wasser zu holen wenn ich Wasser holen muss.

    "brauchen" im Sinne von "müssen" in Verbindung mit Verben gibt es nur in negativen Wendungen.


    Q: Liegt es an der "wenn-dann" Struktur oder am Ausdruck "Wasser holen", dass ich hier "müssen" verwenden muss, "brauchen" nicht verwenden kann? Wie ist die Sätze?

    (Is it because the "wenn-dann" structure or the expression "Wasser holen" that I have to use "must" here and cannot use "need"? How about the sentences?)

    1.1 Ich brauche jetzt, Wasser zu holen.

    1.2 Ich rufe dich nur dann an, wenn ich jemand brauche, zu unterhalten.


    Vielen Dank für eure Antwort.

    #299Author azhong (1362382)  31 Oct 22, 02:56
    Comment

    Es sind zwei Verwendungen von brauchen zu unterscheiden:

    1. brauchen im Sinne von "need" mit Objekt (Substantiv).

    Ich brauche Hilfe. Ich brauche Wasser.

    Ich brauche jemanden, um mich zu unterhalten / oder: Ich brauche jemanden, mit dem ich mich unterhalten kann.

    Hier kann man "normal" verneinen:

    Ich brauche keine Hilfe. Ich brauche deine Hilfe nicht. Ich brauche das nicht. etc.

    2. brauchen im Sine von "have to do sth / need to do sth" kann nur in negativen Sätzen verwendet werden.

    Du musst sagen: Ich muss jetzt Wasser holen. "brauchen" ist falsch.

    In der Verneinung geht: Ich muss kein Wasser holen. oder eben: ich brauche kein Wasser zu holen.


    Dieser seltsamen Sachverhalt bei der Benutzung von "brauchen" im Sinne von "müssen" ist mir selbst erst klargeworden, als mich ein chinesischer Freund einmal fragte: Brauche ich den Müll raustragen? - was ja falsch ist und mir sehr komisch vorkam. Er sprach nämlich ansonsten schon sehr gut deutsch.

    Er hätte fragen sollen: Soll ich den Müll raustragen?

    Aber meine Antwort hätte sein können: Nein, das brauchst du nicht zu tun.


    Der Faden ist jetzt geschlossen. Hier kannst du antworten.

    #300Author RightSaidFred (1322814)  31 Oct 22, 10:05
    This thread has been closed.
     
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  
 
 
 
 
  automatisch zu   umgewandelt