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    off ramp / step off(career)

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    off ramp / step off(career)

    Comment
    I'm checking a text about women stopping their careers for family reasons. It uses the phrase "off ramp" for this, e.g. "the connection between off ramps and the lack of part-time jobs". This appears to be a normal word in AE, but I'd never heard it and I think the Germans reading the text will also have problems. Can anyone suggestion anything better?

    It also says "women step off their careers", which again may be standard AE but sounds odd to me. "Abandon their careers" sounds a rather final, and "take a career break" implies that there is a clear intention to return to work later. Is there an alternative word that leaves things a bit more open?

    Thanks for any suggestions.
    AuthorPhilip (BE)25 Sep 06, 10:41
    Comment
    @Philip (BE): Although 'step off one's career' and 'off ramp' (in this sense) may be set phrases in the HR world, I don't believe they are common, everyday language in AE, either. (The only off-ramp I know is the one you use to leave the freeway, and step off usually means to begin something, not to interrupt it.)

    The human resources field is known for coming up with some unusual terms (in my company, we have all sorts of 'pyramids' and 'triangles' and 'ladders'....) So, these could be specific to a particular company or maybe to a particular author and his 'human resources concept'.
    #1AuthorTRS (ae in de)25 Sep 06, 12:18
    Comment
    Agree with TRS (ae in de).

    Just my 2 paise.
    'Ramp' can also mean the ramp that fashion models strutt on.
    As a career. And then to 'step off it, to leave/ to step off the ramp/ to take a break' from the career.
    Im afraid Im yet to encounter the "women step off their careers" phrase!
    #2Authorminu25 Sep 06, 22:06
    Comment
    These uses of "off ramp" and "step off" are new to me.

    Google shows that "off ramp" is used in this sense--and often as a verb ("Once women off-ramp, even for a brief period..."). Still, it isn't very common.

    Google reports of "step off" in this sense are very infrequent, except for phrases like "step off the career track" or "step off the corporate treadmill" (and these longer phrases might work for your context).

    The usual phrases I encounter are "take time off from a career" or "leave a job to devote more time/energy to family/hobby/other interest".
    #3AuthorGeorgeA (US)26 Sep 06, 00:14
    Comment
    "Take time off from a career" or "leave a job to devote more time/energy to family/hobby/other interest" sounds like newspaper English.
    #4Authorminu26 Sep 06, 00:52
    Comment
    Phillip BE, as to alternatives, what about "take some time out"? It doesn't say how much or for which reasons. (Although "time out" is also what children get when they've hit someone over the head with a shovel on the playground)
    #5Authortanja126 Sep 06, 08:01
    Comment
    Thanks for your comments. I'm reassured to hear that I'm not the only one who finds these HR phrases rather obscure ;-) I'll change it to "take time off/out".
    #6AuthorPhilip (BE)26 Sep 06, 08:42
     
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