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    heath heathen Heide Heiden

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    heath heathen Heide Heiden

    Comment
    Is there an etymological root or indeed reason as to why the words in questions seem to have a calque - (heath heathen) and (Heide Heiden)? In other words has ancient history a story to tell about PAGANS & HEATHER?
    AuthorHiberno11 May 08, 23:17
    Comment
    Kann sein. Der Etymologie-Duden (Duden Herkunftswörterbuch) deutet eine mögliche Verbindung der beiden Begriffe an, bleibt aber bei vagen Vermutungen.
    #1Author tigger (236106) 11 May 08, 23:41
    Comment
    see www.etymonline.com

    O.E. hæðen "not Christian or Jewish," merged with O.N. heiðinn. Historically assumed to be from Goth. haiþno "gentile, heathen woman," used by Ulfilas in the first translation of the Bible into a Gmc. language (cf. Mark 7:26, for "Greek"); if so it could be a derivative of Goth. haiþi "dwelling on the heath," but this sense is not recorded. It may have been chosen on model of L. paganus (see pagan), or for resemblance to Gk. ethne (see gentile), or may in fact be a borrowing of that word, perhaps via Armenian hethanos. Like other words for exclusively Christian ideas (e.g. church) it would have come first into Gothic, then spread to other Gmc. languages
    #2AuthoriMac (306052) 12 May 08, 08:53
    Comment
    iMac! 1000 Dank dafür. "...die Heiden auf der Heide..." mmm! oder sogar "...did the Heathens wear heather...". Why this should occupy me I shall never know? Ich schwärm für Etymologie.
    #3AuthorHiberno12 May 08, 14:01
     
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