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    Tradition at Thanksgiving?

    Kommentar
    There's one Gary Larson cartoon for which the joke has always eluded me - can't find it on google but it's the pilgrims at the original thanksgiving dinner and one guy "invents" the tradition (?) of sticking olives on his fingers.
    ??
    VerfasserNick A. Lias29 Okt. 08, 12:59
    Kommentar
    Well, I'm not quite sure, but maybe the "message" is this:

    Anytime you wonder how a particular "tradition" originated, someone's likely to tell you (for instance): "Oh, it has been done that way for centuries - ever since the times of the Pilgrims ..." - whether this may be true or not ...
    #1Verfasserwoody29 Okt. 08, 14:29
    Kommentar
    ok, good start.

    maybe it's just that kids like to goof off (particularly at long dinners, not specifically Thanksgiving) by sticking olives on their fingers... ?
    #2VerfasserNick A. Lias29 Okt. 08, 14:33
    Kommentar
    I've never seen kids sticking olives on their fingers during dinner myself. Sometimes Gary Larson is simply absurd, and that is the funny part.
    #3VerfasserSelkie29 Okt. 08, 14:37
    Kommentar
    I've been trying to make out the meaning of it but couldn't come up with anything. It would be great to actually see the cartoon in question but I haven't got the means to google it from here!
    #4Verfasser Electric Barbarella (244879) 29 Okt. 08, 14:41
    Kommentar
    Just bugs me that I don't get it. I usually get them. I don't think there's one that doesn't reference anything and is just "absurd"...
    #5VerfasserNick A. Lias29 Okt. 08, 14:42
    Kommentar
    This really bugs you, doesn't it? Ha, ha!!
    #6Verfassergary l.29 Okt. 08, 14:46
    Kommentar
    I'd tried googling, too - came up with "everything," BUT this Gary Larson Thanksgiving sketch/cartoon - and would also like to know what it could possibly mean.
    #7Verfasser Carly-AE (237428) 29 Okt. 08, 14:50
    Kommentar
    I mean, okay - they are pilgrims and they sit down to the first ever Thanksgiving dinner. So they haven't really got traditions as such.

    But how do the olives come in???
    #8Verfasser Electric Barbarella (244879) 29 Okt. 08, 14:55
    Kommentar
    Auch wenn Selkie sich nicht an so etwas erinnern kann, in anderen amerikanischen Haushalten scheint es das zu geben:

    RE: Far Side
    “Phil - Loved the Thanksgiving one! My kids would spend the whole day standing in the kitchen waiting for the olives to put on their fingers (Went through a LOT of olives!).
    ” (http://www.thebackpacker.com/trailtalk/thread... )

    Mein sehr spekulativer Interpretationsversuch:
    Oliven gibt es in vielen amerikanische Haushalten nur einmal im Jahr, als Bestandteil der Truthahnfüllung. Die Kinder sind fasziniert und spielen damit rum.
    Zum Truthahnessen selbst findet man einiges im Netz. Dass die ersten Pilgerväter von der Mayflower zu Thanksgiving Truthahn gegessen haben, ist danach ein Mythos. Vielleicht wollte Gary Larson darauf anspielen, s. a. woodys #1?
    #9Verfasser Mattes (236368) 29 Okt. 08, 14:56
    Kommentar
    Super. #1 plus #9 makes sense.
    #10VerfasserNick A. Lias29 Okt. 08, 15:05
    Kommentar
    Kennt jemand die Glosse von Dave Barry in der International Herald Tribune, die früher als eine Art Running Gag jedes Jahr zu Thanksgiving erschien? Weiß nicht, ob das jetzt noch so ist. Jedenfalls haben wir uns früher darüber totgelacht.
    #11VerfasserIngrid29 Okt. 08, 15:09
    Kommentar
    We always had really fancy olives in a serving bowl/dish - they were stuffed with almonds, onions, and two other things I cannot recall - so, no way was I "gonna" stick them on my fingers - they were popped into my mouth :-)
    #12Verfasser Carly-AE (237428) 29 Okt. 08, 15:21
    Kommentar

    In honor of the US holiday today...

    Oliven gibt es in vielen amerikanische Haushalten nur einmal im Jahr, als Bestandteil der Truthahnfüllung. Die Kinder sind fasziniert und spielen damit rum.

    I have neither ever eaten nor heard of olives being put in the stuffing for the turkey. I suppose some people somewhere might do so, but it is by no means common.

    As Carly-AE wrote, we, too, had olives at holiday meals when I was growing up. My mom or my aunts, whoever was hosting the meal, would create a carefully planned relish tray that consisted of green and black pitted olives (perhaps stuffed with pimiento if green), glaring green and/or red pickled crab-apples, and a few other such treats.

    My cousin, who was my age, and I definitely put the olives on our fingers during the meal -- it worked better with the unstuffed blacked ones. Our folks weren't especially thrilled by it, but they knew that we'd eat the olives afterwards so that they didn't go to waste.


    Oddly enough, an anti-war protest song sung by Arlo Guthrie in 1967 established itself as a sort of Thanksgiving tradition over the years as radio stations around the country played it on Thanksgiving, often by listener request. (It apparently began as part of a fundraising campaign at a publicly funded station in New York City and spread from there.)

    If you have 18.5 minutes to listen, here is Mr. Guthrie singing it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaKIX6oaSLs&t=6s

    #13Verfasser hbberlin (420040)  24 Nov. 22, 15:56
    Kommentar

    Ohne auf den Link zu klicken.


    You can get anything you want at Alice's Restaurant

    Walk right in it′s around the back

    Just a half a mile from the railroad track

    You can get anything you want at Alice's Restaurant

    

    #14Verfasser traveller in time (589684) 24 Nov. 22, 16:18
    Kommentar

    'xcepting Alice.

    #15Verfasser Martin--cal (272273)  24 Nov. 22, 17:34
    Kommentar

    Oliven gibt es in vielen amerikanische Haushalten nur einmal im Jahr (#9)

    Amazing – they're really missing out on something. I eat them just about every day. They're healthy, too (but perhaps that's why the Americans don't eat them much – SCNR).


    Even if kids' fingers are relatively small, how can they "stick" olives on them?


    you can get anything you want at Alice's Restaurant – 'xepting Alice. (#14/15)

    Who the --- is Alice?

    #16Verfasser Stravinsky (637051)  25 Nov. 22, 06:57
    Kommentar

    @Stravinsky, here's where you can learn all about Alice, her restaurant, and the notorious Thanksgiving "Massa-cree". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m57gzA2JCcM

    #17Verfasser Martin--cal (272273)  25 Nov. 22, 07:31
    Kommentar

    Martin, möglicherweise weiß Stravinsky das alles und wollte nur noch auf zum Beispiel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=saoH-4SvzXE hinweisen, denn es gab mal eine Zeit, wo das "Who the --- is Alice?" fast schon reflexartig ertönte, wenn mal jemand von Alice erzählte.


    PS: Ich glaube, dass in Deutschland auf Volksfesten, bei Sportveranstaltungen etc. auch heute nur die Version mit "Who the --- is Alice?" gegrölt wird, nicht aber die ohne.

    #18Verfasser harambee (91833)  25 Nov. 22, 09:34
    Kommentar


    Oliven gibt es in vielen amerikanische Haushalten nur einmal im Jahr (#9)

    Amazing – they're really missing out on something. I eat them just about every day. They're healthy, too (but perhaps that's why the Americans don't eat them much – SCNR).

    #9’s speculation about olive consumption in the US is outright wrong and likely based on ignorance.

    BTW: Thanks for the gratuitous, likewise ignorant, America bashing. “SCNR”

    #19Verfasser hbberlin (420040) 25 Nov. 22, 15:37
     
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