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    Blustery Day

    Kommentar
    As I look outside today and see the wind blowing the trees and the cloudy overcast day outside, I am tempted to say it is a blustery day. However, when you go outside it is very humid and warm, somehow, I think of blustery as a description of a windy crisp/cool/cold day in particular the late fall or maybe in the late winter/early spring. (Flashback to Winnie the Pooh tv shows with piglet blowing down the road with a neck scarf flapping in the wind.)

    For others, do you feel if you hear about a blustery day, you would not think of a warm day. Does the cool/cold component have to be there for a blustery day?
    Verfassersnickerdoodle (262368) 27 Okt. 09, 20:06
    Kommentar
    Vielleicht liegt es daran, dass bei uns "blustery days" im Herbst stattfinden. Herbststürme sind jedem ein Begriff, aber Sommerstürme? Und in Gegenden, wo es auch im Sommer steife Brisen gibt, sind selbige ebenfalls kühl und nicht warm.
    #1Verfasser Birgila/DE (172576) 27 Okt. 09, 20:20
    Kommentar
    The winds today are coming from the south, so it is a warm breeze and has a lot of moisture. If the winds were from the north it would be more likely to have at least a hint of cool/cold or would be cold (for my area).

    Still I am wondering for other native speakers, if they heard blustery day would it always conjure the cool weather day. I sort of feel like I need to a warm blustery day to convey what is happening.
    #2Verfassersnickerdoodle (262368) 27 Okt. 09, 20:36
    Kommentar
    I partly agree and partly disagree with Birgila.

    Here's the relevant dictionary meaning of blustery: "blowing in loud and abrupt bursts " (see http://onelook.com/?w=blustery&ls=a)

    In the summer (at least in this part of the US), thunderstorms are quite common, and they often have a lot of wind.

    But I agree that the term blustery is generally used for cool or wet or cold days. It would not ordinarily be used to describe a warm windy day.

    #3Verfasser eric (new york) (63613) 27 Okt. 09, 20:36
    Kommentar
    I am much more southerly than you eric (head south on I-95, way south). My summer storms are totally different than this. The clouds would be thunderheads with clouds so dark and heavy you would think it is night time. The winds would gust very violently and the rain would most times be torrential downpours. This happens on a daily or near daily basis. This is definitely our fall weather and today there is no rain and the cloud cover is not so heavy, so light is getting through today.

    Thanks for your feeling eric, because it somehow feels odd to use it for today, but it describes it perfectly except for that very warm thick feeling to the air. Would a warm blustery day work? The dictionary entry only mentions the wind and no mention of the cool/cold or even wet if I recall it accurately.
    #4Verfassersnickerdoodle (262368) 27 Okt. 09, 20:45
    Kommentar
    I also disagree with Birgila; here in SoCal, for instance, some of the most blustery days can occur with Santa Ana winds blowing, when it gets abnormally hot because those winds come from the desert. :-)
    #5Verfasser dude (253248) 27 Okt. 09, 20:54
    Kommentar
    dude, when the Santa Ana winds are blowing do you refer to them as a blustery day? Would you tell someone on the east coast that it was a blustery day when the Santa Ana winds are blowing?

    Although aren't the Santa Ana winds much stronger than piglet blowing winds? Aren't they more like small boar blowing speeds?:-))
    #6Verfassersnickerdoodle (262368) 27 Okt. 09, 20:57
    Kommentar
    My first association with a "blustery day" are clouds of autumn leaves swirling through gusts of wind. For me such days are characterized by particularly strong winds and actually being able to see them in the form of violently swaying trees or blowing leaves. However, growing up in southern California, the very windy days tended to be from the warm and dry Santa Anas - the ones crackling with electricity and the spark of fire.

    edit: @dude - exactly!
    #7VerfasserJoyaBerlin (600831) 27 Okt. 09, 20:59
    Kommentar
    @snickerdoodle: I think JoyaBerlin has just answered your question for me. :-)

    Thank you, Joya.
    #8Verfasser dude (253248) 27 Okt. 09, 21:02
    Kommentar
    My first association with a "blustery day" are clouds of autumn leaves swirling through gusts of wind. For me such days are characterized by particularly strong winds and actually being able to see them in the form of violently swaying trees or blowing leaves. However, growing up in southern California, the very windy days tended to be from the warm and dry Santa Anas - the ones crackling with electricity and the spark of fire.

    edit: @dude - exactly!
    @ snickerdoodle - I would still call it a blustery day. When they're really strong it's rather creepy, though, with all of the mysterious sounds against the windows and such
    #9VerfasserJoyaBerlin (600831) 27 Okt. 09, 21:03
    Kommentar
    What phrase would you use to describe a day of Santa Anas to someone from the east coast or Germany for that matter?
    #10Verfassersnickerdoodle (262368) 27 Okt. 09, 21:04
    Kommentar
    ein heisser, extrem trockener, stark böender Wind, bei dem dir die Haare zu Berge stehen können (wortwörtlich). :-)
    #11Verfasser dude (253248) 27 Okt. 09, 21:17
    Kommentar
    Kein Tag für Strumpfhosen und Röcke ;)
    #12VerfasserJoyaBerlin (600831) 27 Okt. 09, 21:31
    Kommentar
    Wüsst ich nicht, trag' ich nie. ;-)
    #13Verfasser dude (253248) 27 Okt. 09, 21:35
     
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