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    to be in good nick

    Quellen
    They were about to pay themselves big bonuses, so that advertised the fact they were in fairly good nick,” Mr Cable observed. ...

    It's about banking in London from FT.

    Here's some more text, if it helps:

    -- a £1.5bn venture capital initiative launched by the banks last autumn – while the Tories decided without warning that the levy imposed on banks’ balance sheets should be increased by £800m this year to £2.5bn. “They were about to pay themselves big bonuses, so that advertised the fact they were in fairly good nick,” Mr Cable observed.
    Kommentar
    I found this:
    Adj. Quality. Usually heard in the expressions, good nick or bad nick. E.g. "For that much money, you'd expect it to be in good nick."
    http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/n.htm

    Would that be the meaning? Somehow it doesn't make sense to me if it means "quality".

    I'm guessing it's like, "they were in fairly good shape," in AE? Thanks
    Verfasseropine (680211) 12 Feb. 11, 00:29
    Kommentar
    I'm guessing it's like, "they were in fairly good shape," ...?

    Yes: "they were in a fairly good state"

    Somehow it doesn't make sense to me if it means "quality".


    It is a bit unusual to see it used to describe banks. You tend to use it for objects, IMO.

    Doesn't look like it's in LEO, does it?
    #1VerfasserKinkyAfro (587241) 12 Feb. 11, 00:37
    Kommentar
    Thank KinkyAfro. Is this usage then a little different from "quality", like in the "peevish" link above, since it's not really an adj.?
    But I get it: shape/state/condition? in AE. No, I checked Leo before posting and didn't see anything related. Is it "slang"?

    (OT: I remember when you taught me about the other "nick"!)
    #2Verfasseropine (680211) 12 Feb. 11, 00:46
    Kommentar
    Yes, it's slang.

    All I've found on LEO so far are two short threads, one of which was about the sentence "I was in no sort of nick for this encounter", which does sound odd / or at least unusual to me: Siehe auch: be in nick (?)

    OT: I remember when you taught me about the other "nick"!

    Oh yes! "nicking a rubber", right? :-)
    #3VerfasserKinkyAfro (587241) 12 Feb. 11, 00:53
    Kommentar
    Thanks for link. I have to confess to not having checked the archives.
    Short but interesting thread. "... in no sort of nick ..." would also
    support the "state/shape/condition" (for my ears).

    (Yes, that was the "nick".^^)
    #4Verfasseropine (680211) 12 Feb. 11, 01:03
    Kommentar
    Echt "slang", Kinky? Ich hätte es als umgangssprachlich markiert, nicht als "slang". Nichts, wofür sich die Grundschullehrerin schämen müsste...
    #5Verfasser Lady Grey (235863) 12 Feb. 11, 01:03
    Kommentar
    #5: Echt "slang", Kinky?

    Depends how we define "slang", I suppose!
    #6VerfasserKinkyAfro (587241) 12 Feb. 11, 01:06
    Kommentar
    I guess the question would be if either of you would use "nick" in your active vocabulary, either in an informal or formal situation?
    Maybe it's regional in BE. I did read in in FT, but they use 'slang' terms sometimes, AFAIK.

    ("slang" is relative and hard to define.)
    #7Verfasseropine (680211) 12 Feb. 11, 01:13
    Kommentar
    i only ever heard nick informally..to be in good nick = to be in a good condition
    #8Verfasser pittipal (317086) 12 Feb. 11, 09:40
    Kommentar
    #9VerfasserH.B. (213580) 12 Feb. 11, 10:46
     
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