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  • Subject

    Gracious

    Sources
    Hi Leute,
    mal eine Frage. Wie würdet ihr "gracious" in diesem Fall übersetzen?

    "She blushed. Gracious, she was no prude, but she hated to hear a woman swear."


    Die Bedeutungen "anmutig", "gnädig" passen irgendwie finde ich nicht.


    Danke im Voraus.
    AuthorInviTatIon (790673) 04 Sep 11, 23:48
    Ergebnisse aus dem Wörterbuch
    gracious  adj.gnädig
    gracious  adj.gütig
    gracious  adj.freundlich
    gracious livingkultivierter Luxus
    Good gracious!Oh du liebe Zeit!
    Goodness gracious!Du meine Güte!
    Goodness gracious me!Du meine Güte!
    Comment
    Sie war beileibe nicht prüde ...
    Sie war ja nun wirklich nicht prüde ...
    Es sollte keiner behaupten, sie sei prüde ...
    #1Author Lady Grey (235863) 04 Sep 11, 23:55
    Comment
    wohlerzogen / von guter Manier

    evtl.
    #2Author dude (253248) 04 Sep 11, 23:56
    Comment
    Hier ist es aber doch ein Ausruf im Sinn von "Gott im Himmel!"
    #3Author Lady Grey (235863) 04 Sep 11, 23:58
    Comment
    Aber nicht doch, Ihre Greyness. She was gracious, but no prude ...
    heisst das doch.
    #4Author dude (253248) 04 Sep 11, 23:59
    Comment
    Sehe ich nicht so. Warten wir mal, was die anderen sagen.
    #5Author Lady Grey (235863) 05 Sep 11, 00:01
    Comment
    Ich verstehe es auch wie Lady Grey.
    #6Author Gibson (418762) 05 Sep 11, 00:01
    Comment
    Man hat hier einfach das (al)though unterschlagen: (al)though gracious, she was no prude...

    So wie: Short and skinny, he was no weakling ...
    #7Author dude (253248) 05 Sep 11, 00:02
    Comment
    Dagegen spricht schon die Vermischung der Wortarten. Wenn Du Recht hättest, müsste da meiner Meinung nach "she was not prudish" stehen. (Rein gefühlsmäßig, ich kann das nicht mit einer Grammatikregel untermauern)
    #8Author Lady Grey (235863) 05 Sep 11, 00:04
    Comment
    Dagegen spricht auch, dass 'gracious' und 'prude(ish)' keine Gegensätze sind.
    #9Author Gibson (418762) 05 Sep 11, 00:09
    Comment
    "she was no prude" is perfectly good English, and for "gracious" to be the same as "good heavens!" the sentence would need an exclamation mark.
    #10Author dude (253248) 05 Sep 11, 00:09
    Comment
    und noch nicht einmal auf einem Kontinuum liegen... Genau, Gibson.
    "she was no prude" is perfectly good English Ich hab' nie das Gegenteil behauptet.
    and for "gracious" to be the same as "good heavens!" the sentence would need an exclamation mark.
    Das kommt ganz darauf an, wie groß die Emphase ist. Hier offenbar nicht wahnsinnig intensiv.
    #11Author Lady Grey (235863) 05 Sep 11, 00:09
    Comment
    I don't see where the problem is: she was gracious, but no prude. They may not be exact opposites, but they do oppose each other to a degree. She was well-mannered, well-educated, perhaps even a bit restrained, but certainly no prude.

    Anyway, that's how I see it.

    Edit: And in AE at least, it would most likely be "goodness gracious!"
    #12Author dude (253248) 05 Sep 11, 00:13
    Comment
    OK, dann versuch' ich's mal von der anderen Richtung: Ich bin mir so sicher, weil sich keine Frau, die ich kenne, auch nur in Gedanken selbst als "gracious, but no prude" beschreiben würde. Weil aber im folgenden Halbsatz ihre eigenen Gedanken wiedergegeben werden ("she hated..." - das kann außer ihr niemand wissen), erkenne ich den Satz als inneren Dialog, bei dem auch die Zeichensetzung nicht so klar definiert sein muss.
    #13Author Lady Grey (235863) 05 Sep 11, 00:17
    Comment
    Der/die AutorIn kennt ihre Gedanken.

    Hier habe ich so ein Beispiel gefunden:
    http://veteransbreakfastclub.wordpress.com/20...
    Short and skinny, he was not a uniformly scrawny child, but carried a pot belly beneath a constricted rib cage and a normal-size head that appeared large atop narrow shoulders.
    #14Author dude (253248) 05 Sep 11, 00:19
    Comment
    Sowas gibt es natürlich. Hier überzeugt es mich aber so gar nicht.
    #15Author Lady Grey (235863) 05 Sep 11, 00:20
    Comment
    In this example, the author made three sentences out of what easily could have been one:

    http://inkslingerblog.wordpress.com/2011/06/0...
    Beautiful she was. Gracious she was. Intelligent she was not. “But I believed that under my guidance she would smarten up. At any rate, it was worth a try. It is, after all, easier to make a beautiful dumb girl smart than to make an ugly smart girl beautiful.”


    Or rewritten: Beautiful and gracious, she was no intellectual beacon.

    Anyway, I'm not trying to convince you or anyone else. :-)
    #16Author dude (253248) 05 Sep 11, 00:23
    Comment
    Nur Dich selbst, also. :-)
    #17Author Lady Grey (235863) 05 Sep 11, 00:27
    Sources
    I don't need to convince myself.
    Comment
    http://celebritybabies.people.com/2010/11/07/...
    I saw Angie at the Charlotte airport last night (Sunday), she was in the security line next to me. Beautiful and gracious, she was nice to everyone that spoke to her. She seemed to be in a hurry and I have heard that she commutes to NYC to tape her show. It’s an easy 1 1/2 hr flight to NY, so I can see why Charlotte is a good fit.
    #18Author dude (253248) 05 Sep 11, 00:28
    Comment
    I'll add my voice to those of Lady Grey and Gibson.

    I feel sure that 'gracious' is an exclamation (or maybe the term 'interjection' sound less exclamatory).

    It doesn't need an exclamation mark, any more than 'Oh dear, it's started raining' or 'She was no prude, for heaven's sake, but ...'

    To me 'gracious' as an interjection on its own, as opposed to 'goodness gracious' or 'gracious me', sounds quite normal (if perhaps slightly old-fashioned?)

    I also agree with what Lady Grey and Gibson say about the appropriateness or otherwise of 'gracious' as a description applied to the woman, in opposition (more or less) to being a prude.

    (Edit: I have deleted a minor further point I made at the end.)
    #19AuthorHecuba - UK (250280) 05 Sep 11, 00:38
    Comment
    Danke, Hecuba. Vielleicht lässt sich Dude ja von mittlerweile drei Grazien überzeugen ;-)
    #20Author Lady Grey (235863) 05 Sep 11, 00:58
    Comment
    One more vote for its being an interjection, as if she were thinking out loud. There's no grammatical reason why it couldn't be an adjective in apposition, but in this case I think the context is decisive. The point is evidently that she is old-fashioned, and probably also prudish compared to whoever it was that was swearing; it's a rather grandmotherly exclamation.
    #21Author hm -- us (236141) 05 Sep 11, 02:11
    Comment
    goodness gracious! I give up! You ladies win.
    #22Author dude (253248) 05 Sep 11, 02:33
     
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