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  • Betreff

    get sb. sick

    Quellen
    " You got me sick, but I don´t know what I did! Need to take a break to figure it out...Still got your voice in my head 'Let´s just be friends...'(...)"

    Kommentar
    How would you translate that? Would something like " Du hast mich über" fit?
    Thanks...
    VerfasserGreetings from Fethard (896939) 11 Dez. 12, 20:33
    Kommentar
    Nein, ich würde es anders verstehen, nämlich: "Du hast mich krank gemacht/ Deinetwegen geht es mir nicht gut".
    #1VerfasserLady Grey (235863) 11 Dez. 12, 20:34
    Kommentar
    Really? Das ist aber ziemlich dramatisch..."Du hast mich krank gemacht, aber ich weiß nicht, was ich getan hab." Also, ich weiß nicht, dass klingt irgendwie nicht passend...
    Trotzdem danke und ich suche weiter...

    xoxo
    #2VerfasserGreetings from Fethard (896939) 11 Dez. 12, 21:02
    Kommentar
    Warum nicht? "Ich weiß nicht, womit ich das verdient habe (dass Du mich mit "lass uns lieber nur gute Freunde sein" abspeist) ... Deinetwegen geht es mir nicht gut" klingt für mich eigentlich sehr plausibel. Aber ich kenne natürlich den Kontext - im Gegensatz zu Dir - nicht.
    #3VerfasserLady Grey (235863) 11 Dez. 12, 21:05
    Kommentar
    Stimmt,wenn man die Übersetzung so konstruiert, passt es doch. Danke für die schnelle Hilfe, es war echt wichtig....

    xoxo
    #4VerfasserGreetings from Fethard (896939) 11 Dez. 12, 21:24
    Kommentar
    You got me sick is substandard English.
    #5VerfasserJurist (US) (804041) 12 Dez. 12, 00:12
    Quellen
    11 [+ obj] : to cause (someone or something) to be in a specified position or condition
    ▪ He got his feet wet when he stepped in a puddle. ▪ He got his nose broken in a fight. [=his nose was broken in a fight] ▪ I told you not to get yourself dirty. ▪ You nearly got us both killed!
    http://www.learnersdictionary.com/search/get

    18make somebody/something become something [transitive] to make someone or something change to a new feeling, situation, or state: Sometimes she gets me so angry!
    Don't get the children too excited.
    He was terrified of getting her pregnant.
    It took them fifteen minutes to get the boat ready.
    http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/get
    Kommentar
    In BE I would say 'You got me ill' would be informal; I'm not sure it would count as substandard. More formally you'd say 'You made me ill.'
    #6VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 12 Dez. 12, 08:19
    Kommentar
    @ Jurist and CM2DD : It certainly is informal- I quoted from a SMS convo....So that´s obviously not high standard english ;)
    Thanks for your help,

    xoxo
    #7VerfasserGreetings from Fethard (896939) 12 Dez. 12, 08:49
    Kommentar
    Vielleicht, um dem substandard näher zu kommen:
    Du kotzt mich an. Keine Ahnung, warum./Weiß nicht, woran's liegt/Weiß nicht, ob's an mir liegt. Is' halt so. Ich brauch 'ne Auszeit, um damit klar zu kommen.
    #8Verfasserhereami (863914) 12 Dez. 12, 09:55
    Kommentar
    @hereami : Im Prinzip kann man das auch so verstehen, allerdings würde ich es eher andersherum übersetzen... " Ich kotze dich an,keine Ahnung,warum (und so weiter...)"
    Sonst macht es auch vom Kontext her keinen Sinn...
    xoxo
    #9VerfasserGreetings from Fethard (896939) 12 Dez. 12, 13:34
    Kommentar
    I would understand it just the same as Lady Grey and the dictionaries.
    #10VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 12 Dez. 12, 14:15
    Kommentar
    Hm. Would you say what @hereami wrote isn´t an appropriate translation ?
    #11VerfasserGreetings from Fethard (896939) 12 Dez. 12, 14:29
    Kommentar
    It doesn't sound like the same thing to me, no. Is the writer a native speaker of English?
    #12VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 12 Dez. 12, 15:02
    Kommentar
    Yes,he is. He's from Ireland,if that helps...
    xoxo
    #13VerfasserGreetings from Fethard (896939) 12 Dez. 12, 16:08
    Kommentar
    #13 might as well read: no, he is from Ireland... ;--/
    #14Verfassernoli (489500) 12 Dez. 12, 16:12
    Kommentar
    Maybe Irish English is different in this case, but it doesn't sound idiomatic to me either.

    'Make someone sick/ill' is the usual idiom when you mean to sicken someone, either a literal physical illness or a feeling of nausea, or in the sense of sick at heart. The oysters made me sick. Overwork made him ill. It makes me sick to think that I didn't even say hello to her!

    'To get someone [adj.]' is also a familiar idiom, but only with other adjectives, not with 'sick' or 'ill.' The examples from the dictionary in #6 sound okay, but 'Don't get the children sick' would not sound very idiomatic to me, and 'You got me sick' in the sentence given doesn't sound right at all.

    So I wonder if in colloquial Irish English 'get someone sick' might have some other meaning. 'I don't know what I did' suggests that the speaker did something wrong, so the other person got angry and wanted to break up, break off the romantic relationship (said 'Let's just be friends'). But even in that context, for the speaker to say 'You got/made me [adj.]' when he is the one at fault doesn't seem to fit.

    Is this by any chance a song lyric? They don't always make a lot of sense ...

    #15Verfasserhm -- us (236141) 12 Dez. 12, 18:12
    Kommentar
    WOW, hm! I would never ever have wondered "Is this by any chance a song lyric?" - but, it is :-))
    http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/onedirection/h...

    #16VerfasserCarly-AE (237428) 12 Dez. 12, 18:34
    Kommentar
    So much for "I quoted from a SMS convo" then (#7). People are plagiarizing their text messages now? O world, what have you come to ;)
    #17VerfasserGibson (418762) 12 Dez. 12, 18:39
    Quellen
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Direction
    One Direction ist eine britisch-irische Boygroup, bestehend aus den Mitgliedern Niall Horan, Zayn Malik, Liam Payne, Harry Styles und Louis Tomlinson. Sie wurden Dritter bei der siebten britischen Ausgabe der Casting-Show The X Factor und unterschrieben im Nachhinein einen Plattenvertrag bei Sony Music.
    Kommentar
    Gibson, S/he at least got the "Irish" part right :-))
    #18VerfasserCarly-AE (237428) 12 Dez. 12, 18:51
    Kommentar
    Wow,I wouldn't have thought that! People can be nasty..:( It's actually not my fault if my friend can't make up a own text for his SMS.But thanks that you showed this plagiarism to me so I can- and definitely will!- ask him where and why the words left him;)
    xoxo
    #19VerfasserGreetings from Fethard (896939) 13 Dez. 12, 00:43
    Kommentar
    My experience with Irish English mainly comes from reading Marian Keyes books, but I do believe that 'get' is more commonly used in that way over there.

    It's not plagiarism when you quote from a song that expresses what you want to say.
    #20VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 13 Dez. 12, 08:18
    Kommentar
    I wasn't being serious, but it shouldn't matter what you quote. If you don't admit that you're quoting, it's plagiarism. Otherwise nothing would ever be plagiarism, would it?
    #21VerfasserGibson (418762) 13 Dez. 12, 10:18
    Kommentar
    Do I have to tell you that I'm quoting if I say 'A rose, by any other name, would smell as sweet'? Surely it's only plagiarism if you are trying to make people think that those are your own words (or if you are writing them without quotes in your doctoral dissertation, of course). In his defence this bloke could say it was obvious that those weren't his own words; that surely anyone GfF's age would know those lyrics.
    #22VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 13 Dez. 12, 10:28
    Kommentar
    @CM2DD: GfF = ? Girlfriend?
    He'll be happy to hear that you are now defending him because he actually said the same as you did ( he thought it was obvious that he quoted from that Song - but honestly, do you have to know that band??) :)
    xoxo
    #23VerfasserGreetings from Fethard (896939) 13 Dez. 12, 11:53
    Kommentar
    My first though was that the writer had contracted an STD or other illness from the recipient of the text... that's the only way I can interpret "you got me sick". ;-)
    #24Verfasserthe kat (387522) 13 Dez. 12, 12:11
    Kommentar
    the down-to-earth kat...
    #25Verfassernoli (489500) 13 Dez. 12, 12:16
    Kommentar
    #23 GfF = an abbreviation of your nick*, which looks weird as part of a sentence :-)

    I've heard of the band, and I'm really not in their target group, but would not recognise one of their lyrics if it jumped up and bit me. Feel free to borrow that response.

    *What is the proper word for that in English? :-o
    #26VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 13 Dez. 12, 12:17
    Kommentar
    If it hit/slapped me in the face??
    #27VerfasserCarly-AE (237428) 13 Dez. 12, 12:25
    Kommentar
    Nick? You mean "nickname"?
    #28Verfasserthe kat (387522) 13 Dez. 12, 12:46
    Kommentar
    No; 'handle' or whatever the cool word is :-)
    #29VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 13 Dez. 12, 14:39
    Kommentar
    "Handle" is (or used to be) used in trucking circles, as far as I know... on the internet I think it's just nickname, or even more prosiac, "user name"... Not cool.
    #30Verfasserthe kat (387522) 13 Dez. 12, 14:51
    Kommentar
    Surely it's only plagiarism if you are trying to make people think that those are your own words

    Well, as GfF clearly understood it like that, I didn't think the idea was too bizarre. Again: you could defend any plagiarism with "I thought you knew that! How could you not?" Very convenient.

    (But, as I said, I was trying to make a joke. I had no idea it would turn into a discussion about the definition of 'plagiarism'.)
    #31VerfasserGibson (418762) 13 Dez. 12, 20:24
     
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