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    Houston, we have lift off

    [phrase][Amer.]
    Sources
    Ich kenne nur das berühmte Houston, we have a problem.

    Gibt es hierfür auch eine Art offizielle Übersetzung? Nach dem Motto, Houston, wir sind gestartet? oder Houston, wir haben abgehoben? Oder wie?
    AuthorDon47 (770415) 09 Dec 13, 17:00
    SuggestionHouston, die Saturn ist problemlos gestartet.
    #1AuthorWerner (236488) 09 Dec 13, 17:01
    Comment
    Moon landings nerd here. Meiner Meinung nach ist das ein falsches Zitat. "Houston, we have lift off" gibt es als Zitat so gar nicht. "Houston" ist eine Anrede, die impliziert, dass die Raumschiffbesatzung den erfolgreichen Start an die Bodenkontrolle in Houston meldet. Das ist so aber nicht passiert. Stattdessen vermeldete die Bodenkontrolle in Houston den erfolgreichen Start an die Raumschiffbesatzung und and die Zuschauer der TV-Übertragung. Auf diesem Weg ist auch das Zitat "Lift-off! We have a lift-off!" vom Apollo-11-Start berühmt geworden. Hier das Video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_d...


    Apropos, das definitive Werk zur Geschichte des Apollo-Programms ist das folgende:

    http://www.andrewchaikin.com/books/a-man-on-t...
    #2AuthorHimalia (970475) 09 Dec 13, 17:16
    Comment
    While it's long ago in the past, as a kid, I watched lift-offs religiously. I agree with Himalia. The phrase was "Lift-off! We have a lift-off" or very similar, and that would have been said by ground control, not from the capsule to control. The only thing I could imagine with "Houston..." would be that the facilities in Cape Canaveral (or Cape Kennedy, as I've always preferred...) were announcing the lift-off to Houston.

    No idea where "Saturn" came in in #1. This language came from Mercury and Gemini, too. "Houston, we have a problem"--yes, that was made famous by the Saturn program.
    #3Authorhbberlin (420040) 09 Dec 13, 17:56
    Comment
    Spitze, total interessant.

    Und wie soll ich das jetzt übersetzen?
    #4AuthorDon47 (770415) 10 Dec 13, 11:21
    SuggestionRakete erfolgreich abgehoben!
    Comment
    @ 4: Übersetzung im Prinzip so wie # 1, oder vielleicht so wie oben.
    #5Authormad (239053) 10 Dec 13, 11:33
    Comment
    Einfach mit "Huston, wir sind gestartet", wie sonst?

    Es ist doch glaubhaft, dass jemand irgendwann "Houston, we have lift off" oä. gesagt hat, und zwar jemand, der auf dem Mond sass im Moment wo die Kapsel von dem Mond abheben musste und die erste konkrete Bestätigung an die Bodenkontrolle, dass das gelungen war und jemand noch lebte, durch diese oder eine ähnliche Meldung der Besatzung kommen musste.
    Jedenfalls keine Saturn oder sonstige Rakete weit und breit.
    #6AuthorMarco P (307881) 10 Dec 13, 11:41
    Comment
    Es ist doch glaubhaft, dass jemand irgendwann "Houston, we have lift off" oä. gesagt hat, und zwar jemand, der auf dem Mond sass im Moment wo die Kapsel von dem Mond abheben musste

    Die NASA hat eine offizielle Webseite zur Geschichte des Apollo-Porogrammes namens Apollo Lunar Surface Journal. Auf der Webseite sind die kompletten Transkripte der Funkkommunikation zwischen Bodenkontrolle und den Apollo-Raumschiffen von den Starts bis zu den Erdlandungen zugänglich. Ich habe die Transkripte per erweiterter Google-suche gecheckt und das vorgegebene Zitat ist so niemals in der Kommunikation zwischen Houston und den Apollo-Raumschiffen geäußert worden. Es dürfte sich also tatsächlich um ein falsches Zitat handeln. Demnach kann es auch keine offizielle Übersetzung dafür geben und man kann es nach Lust und Laune übersetzen.

    Hier ist der Link zum Apollo Lunar Surface Journal:

    http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/frame.html
    #7AuthorHimalia (970475) 10 Dec 13, 21:26
    Comment
    In this video, an astronaut says, "Houston, we have ignition . . . and liftoff." He says it as the lunar module takes off from the moon.

    Starting at about 0:45
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEFxZNqFlN0

    I listened to a couple other lunar module launch videos - and in another they say, "We're on our way Houston" and another they just said "What a ride, what a ride!"

    Even though it is not a phrase that was used regularly, the phrase "Houston, we have . . ." is burned into our consciousness. Two movies apparently have used the phrase, "Houston, we have lift-off"
    http://www.subzin.com/search.php?q=houston%2C...

    and if you google the phrase, you find numerous examples of people using "Houston, we have lift-off" for many different reasons.
    #8Authorsvaihingen (705121) 10 Dec 13, 22:29
    Comment
    In this video, an astronaut says, "Houston, we have ignition . . . and liftoff." He says it as the lunar module takes off from the moon.


    I've looked up the exact point in NASA's official transcript when the lift-off of Apollo 14's ascent module from the lunar surface occurs, which is what is documented in the video you posted. Here is the official transcription:

    CLM = Lunar Module Commander
    LMP = Lunar Module Pilot
    CC = CAPCOM (Capsule Communicator, i.e. ground control)

    CLM: "Okay. The abort stage is set. ASCENT ENGINE is ARMED. 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 -"

    LMP: "IGNITION."

    CLM: "We have ignition - -"

    LMP: "What a lift-off!"

    CLM: "- - And LIFT-OFF."

    CC: "Roger. Ignition."

    LMP: "... Pitchover."

    CLM: "There's pitchover. 10 seconds."

    If you want to look it up yourself, it's in the following pdf file on page 796.

    http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a14/AS14_TEC.PDF
    #9AuthorHimalia (970475) 10 Dec 13, 22:56
    Comment
    Even though it is not a phrase that was used regularly, the phrase "Houston, we have . . ." is burned into our consciousness. Two movies apparently have used the phrase, "Houston, we have lift-off"

    Which seem to be similar cases of using a false quotation that has no basis in recorded history.

    and if you google the phrase, you find numerous examples of people using "Houston, we have lift-off" for many different reasons.

    Can you please post a couple of links. I can't seem to find any such examples.

    Edit: Oh, you mean random people using the phrase. Okay, I concede that random people might have used the phrase for various reasons.
    #10AuthorHimalia (970475) 10 Dec 13, 23:01
    Comment
    Someone mutters something after "one" and just before "we have ignition" that sounded like Houston to me. You can listen for yourself. It may be something else.

    Here are samples of various people using the phrase:
    http://www.younghouselove.com/2011/10/houston...
    http://oppositelock.jalopnik.com/houston-we-h...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PpmLfdz1tE
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/pmeidinger/1931254/
    http://www.hellolovedesigns.com/houston-we-ha...
    http://knordicmedia.com/
    http://thewindsorinstitute.com/blog/?p=138
    http://www.cbssports.com/nba/eye-on-basketbal...


    Several of them relate to new business ventures, some of them relate to cute(?) jumping cat photos, some of them to basketball players named Houston or basketball teams from Houston.
    #11Authorsvaihingen (705121) 10 Dec 13, 23:12
    Comment
    Well, it's only NASA's official transcript. Anyway, see my edit in #10:

    Oh, you mean random people using the phrase. Okay, I concede that random people might have used the phrase for various reasons.
    #12AuthorHimalia (970475) 10 Dec 13, 23:14
    Comment
    Even found three results for "Houston, we have cheese."

    If you search for "Houston we have" -problem -ignition -launch you get many random uses of the "Houston, we have . . . " phrase.
    #13Authorsvaihingen (705121) 10 Dec 13, 23:17
    Comment
    Conceded.
    #14AuthorHimalia (970475) 10 Dec 13, 23:19
     
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