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    Englisch gesucht

    I hope you've had a ??? Christmas, and this mail finds you well.

    Betreff

    I hope you've had a ??? Christmas, and this mail finds you well.

    Kommentar
    Einleitungssatz einer geschäftlichen e-mail; ich bin ratlos, welches Adjektiv hier richtig wäre. Lovely hätte mir gefallen, ist aber "vergeben", denn die letzte Elektropost der Adressatin an mich, knapp vor Weihnachten, schloss mit den Worten Have a lovely Christmas. Das wäre denn doch zu imitativ. Nice ist irgendwie schwach, beautiful wohl zu denglish, merry womöglich zu postkartenhaft...
    Aber was tät' denn passen?
    Verfasserlate bird (666148) 27 Dez. 16, 10:50
    Kommentar
    "wonderful"?
    #1VerfasserB.L.Z. Bubb (601295) 27 Dez. 16, 10:57
    Kommentar
    peaceful
    restful

    #2Verfasserpenguin (236245) 27 Dez. 16, 10:58
    Kommentar
    zB wonderful, great, fabulous
    #3VerfasserViking_ (925763) 27 Dez. 16, 10:58
    Kommentar
    nice
    or good
    #4VerfasserHappyWarrior (964133) 27 Dez. 16, 11:05
    Kommentar
    MANY THANKS!
    Of all the suggestions, peaceful and the simple good are the ones I like most (maybe it's for the quality of "quietness") - I guess, I'll have to flip a coin now...
    #5Verfasserlate bird (666148) 27 Dez. 16, 11:27
    Kommentar
    While Christmas is indeed connected to peace, I wouldn't say that much of the English-speaking world would wish someone a "peaceful Christmas." Consider the standard greetings: "merry" and "happy." There are other suggestions here that are not quite as "German-influenced," IMO.
    #6Verfasserhbberlin (420040) 27 Dez. 16, 12:53
    Kommentar
    I have several English-speaking friends who wished me a peaceful Christmas - and why on earth not? And while you wish others a merry or a happy Christmas, I don't think either of those would fit in the e-mail the OP wanted to write, namely I hope you've had a ??? Christmas.
    #7Verfasserpenguin (236245) 27 Dez. 16, 13:25
    Kommentar
    Sure, "a peaceful Christmas" may be said by some people in some situations, but I would argue that it isn't as common/likely as some others would be.
    #8Verfasserhbberlin (420040) 27 Dez. 16, 13:44
    Kommentar
    Agree with hbberlin.

    "I hope you had a peaceful Christmas" is what I would say if I knew that the previous Christmas they were involved in a brawl.

    Before Christmas, I wish people a merry Christmas or a nice or good Christmas. After Christmas, I say "I hope you had a good (or nice) Christmas."
    #9VerfasserHappyWarrior (964133) 27 Dez. 16, 14:38
    Kommentar
    "nice" is such a meaningless word - like "nett" in German
    #10Verfasserpenguin (236245) 27 Dez. 16, 14:49
    Kommentar
    It's not meaningless at all. Maybe you're just not nice often enough to have experience with it? (A joke, btw. No offense intended.)
    #11VerfasserHappyWarrior (964133) 27 Dez. 16, 14:53
    Kommentar
    That may work for "nett" in German, but it's not always the case in English and it's not helpful to make a universal generalization about it. A "nice Christmas" would indicate something like "a pleasant Christmas" and would be appropriate (at least in AE).
    If, however, someone told you about some event or similar and your response was "Oh, isn't that nice," it could be a basically meaningless phrase (or not, depending on the situation, how it was said, etc.).
    #12Verfasserhbberlin (420040) 27 Dez. 16, 15:09
    Kommentar
    I would simply use "good Christmas" in the given context.
    #13VerfasserSpike BE (535528) 27 Dez. 16, 17:30
    Kommentar
    Agree with penguin; "nice Christmas" is pretty meaningless. Which term or phrase is very dependent on the relationship IMO. How much is known about the circumstances -  "stress-free, peaceful Christmas" could be just right e.g.
    #14Verfassermikefm (760309) 27 Dez. 16, 23:28
    Kommentar
    Well, I eventually went with good Christmas (and I didn't even flip a coin).
    I thought this would be a somewhat "neutral" way to put it (and, after all, I don't know the addressee too well, so I can't imagine what kind of Christmas she would wish to have...)
    Still, many, many thanks everybody!
    #15Verfasserlate bird (666148) 27 Dez. 16, 23:38
    Kommentar
    .and this mail finds you well.

    OT: In English, we typically speak of "e-mail" (although our e-mail programs may have mail boxes, and AOL made the phrase "You've got mail!" "famous" in its early days.

    Re #14: Just how is "nice" any more meaningless than "good" or "pleasant"?

    #16Verfasserhbberlin (420040) 31 Dez. 16, 15:15
    Kommentar
    Re #14: Just how is "nice" any more meaningless than "good" or "pleasant"?

    - not sure what you mean, nice, good or pleasant can all be pretty meaningless I'd say. They all need qualifying with "very", "really" etc.  
    #17Verfassermikefm (760309) 31 Dez. 16, 15:43
    Kommentar
    People say "merry Christmas" all the time. It's idiomatic. I find it funny that a native German speaker finds it too "postkartenhaft." :-) I mean... just learning how and when to say "guten Rutsch" requires 10 lines of computer code. And God forbid you say "guten Morgen" at 10:01... :-)
    #18Verfasserfloomie (978898) 31 Dez. 16, 16:15
    Kommentar
    forbid you say "guten Morgen" at 10:01... - Du meinst wohl 12:01 ...
    :-))
    #19Verfasserno me bré (700807) 31 Dez. 16, 17:32
    Kommentar
    How about pleasant? I hope you had a pleasant Christmas?
    #20VerfasserLara@ (269134) 31 Dez. 16, 20:58
    Kommentar
    'Pleasant,' also good.

    Too late now, but just for the record:

    'I hope you've had a good Christmas' -- As I am writing this, it is still Dec. 25.
    'I hope you had a good Christmas' -- It's now after Christmas; whatever you did on Christmas Day is over.
    #21Verfasserhm -- us (236141) 01 Jan. 17, 09:06
    Kommentar
    #21 hm--us, the present perfect is fine in this sentence in BE. We are generally more open to the use of present perfect for things that have recently happened, and not just events that are still happening. Also, I think there's an argument to be made that 'Christmas' can apply to both the day and the season, in which case it extends beyond 25 December. I'd probably choose present perfect.
    #22Verfasserpapousek (343122) 01 Jan. 17, 10:05
    Kommentar
    I also would not think it wrong to say (or hear) "I hope you've had a good / nice Christmas"--even if it's said on January 2, for example.
    #23VerfasserHappyWarrior (964133) 01 Jan. 17, 10:29
    Kommentar
    I'd agree that "merry" doesn't really work here, but not because it is "zu postkartenhaft" (it isn't, and as has been pointed out, it is used regularly), but rather because I don't think it works very well in the past tense. It's not technically wrong, but it doesn't quite feel right.

    I would simply go with something like "I hope you had a great Christmas" or similar.
    #24VerfasserRichard (236495) 01 Jan. 17, 12:46
    Kommentar
    Danke, Richard - ich wollte 'great Christmas' vorschlagen - da es aber 23 Post lang von niemandem erwähnt wurde, habe ich mich gefragt, ob es vielleicht zu übertrieben klingen würde. Offenbar dann doch nicht ;-)
    #25VerfasserGibson (418762) 01 Jan. 17, 19:08
    Kommentar
    (sorry, doppelpost)
    #26VerfasserGibson (418762) 01 Jan. 17, 19:08
    Kommentar
    Bei der Anfrage musste ich irgendwie an 'fragwürdige Weihnachten' denken. :-/
    #27Verfasserwor (335727) 02 Jan. 17, 10:58
     
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