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    German missing

    gamesmanship: Konnotation pos./neg. ?

    Subject

    gamesmanship: Konnotation pos./neg. ?

    Sources

    Hier in den Übersetzungsalternativen sind drei positiv konnotiert und das vierte negativ (unsportlich); wenn man das Wort nun isoliert einsetzt, wäre es also eher positiv, im Sinne von "gerissen" oder negativ im Sinne von unfair ?

    Und wie könnte man etwaigen Zweifel beseitigen ?

    Comment

    Dankeschön & Thank you very much !

    Authorsacgo (341181) 08 Dec 19, 10:36
    Sources
    LEO:
    gamesmanship - die Ablenkungsmanöver Pl.
    gamesmanship [SPORT] - Gerissenheit beim Spiel [ugs.]
    gamesmanship [SPORT] - Gewieftheit beim Spiel [ugs.]
    gamesmanship [SPORT] - unsportliches Verhalten
    diplomatic gamesmanship - diplomatische Schläue
    political gamesmanship - politische Schläue
    Dictionary: gamesmanship
    Comment

    I must say, I don't see how any of the entries could have a very positive connotation, unless you're on the same team and underhanded / sneaky methods meet with your approval.

    In my experience, gamesmanship always has a negative tinge, even though it's sometimes expected or necessary. It means knowing the rules so well that you can use them to your advantage, even if that isn't in keeping with gentlemanly behavior, chivalry, ethics, etc.

    Examples of gamesmanship in soccer would be ...

    • diving, exaggerating a hit
    • writhing in apparent agony and clutching a body part in order to prompt a video replay
    • committing a professional foul (taking a yellow card for the team)
    • surreptitiously moving the ball forward from where it went out or where the foul occurred
    • playing on until the whistle, even when an opponent may seem to be down injured
    • protesting every call loudly, arguing with the referee, gesturing for VAR
    • wasting time, running out the clock, especially near the end of the game

    #1Authorhm -- us (236141)  08 Dec 19, 12:01
    Comment

    thx hm !

    I share your view that pure, emntire sportsmanship is king -- and a mandatory, especially for professionals.

    In German language, "Gewieftheit" has a rather positive connotation; with "Gerissenheit" rather in the middle between pos. and neg.

    But this is always a complicated discussion.

    I think there is a positive field when it comes to game tactics or the exploitation of the rules in a still fair manner.

    Or is "gamesmanship" the opposite of "sportsmanship" ?

    #2Authorsacgo (341181) 08 Dec 19, 12:33
    Comment
    >>Or is "gamesmanship" the opposite of "sportsmanship"?

    Yes, now that you mention it.

    Examples of sportsmanship in soccer ...

    • kicking the ball out when an opponent seems to be injured
    • giving the ball back to the other team when they have kicked the ball out for your player

    'Sporting' is synonymous with gentlemanly, chivalrous, ethical.
    #3Authorhm -- us (236141)  08 Dec 19, 12:53
    Comment

    Interessante Ausführung ... Danke !

    #4Authorno me bré (700807) 08 Dec 19, 12:56
    Comment
    *Edith would like to add*

    Examples of sportsmanship in soccer ...

    • holding up a hand when you have committed a foul, missed a pass, or made a mistake
    #5Authorhm -- us (236141)  08 Dec 19, 12:58
    Comment

    cool, thank you !

    wie würden das auf deutsch benennen ?

    ...sportsmännisch (korrekter "sportsmenschlich" ?) g'g'über "unsportlich" ?

    Weil, "sportlich" bedeutet ja nicht zwingenderweise "fair".

    #6Authorsacgo (341181) 08 Dec 19, 14:47
    Comment

    eine faire / sportliche Geste

    ein Zeichen von gutem Sportsgeist

    #7Authormbshu (874725) 08 Dec 19, 16:12
    Comment

    and a mandatory, especially for professionals. (#2)


    a mandatory what?

    #8AuthorGibson (418762) 09 Dec 19, 00:17
    Comment

    @Gibson: sportsmanship is a mandatory for professionals in sports

    #9Authorsacgo (341181) 09 Dec 19, 07:22
    Comment

    My point was that 'mandatory' is normally an adjective, so 'a mandatory' sounds a bit strange IMO.

    #10AuthorGibson (418762)  09 Dec 19, 10:22
    Comment

    OK, thx. I have read it also as a "substantiviertes Adjektiv"

    ...google says "noun: variant spelling of mandatary"

    #11Authorsacgo (341181) 09 Dec 19, 10:57
    Comment

    Aber "mandatary" bedeutet etwas völlig anderes, das kommt von Siehe Wörterbuch: mandated


    Tipp: Bedeutungen im einsprachigen Wörterbuch prüfen, z.B. durch Suchen von "(Begriff) meaning"

    mandatary meaning

    #12Authorpenguin (236245)  09 Dec 19, 11:00
    Comment

    Danke, Penguin. Ich prüfe meistens hin und her, da ich Eure Zeit und Nerven nicht unnötig strapazieren möchte. Zu "a mandatory" machte ich jedoch nur einen Quic-Check, mea culpa.

    Könnt Ihr bestätigen, dass es auch als Noun eingesetzt wird ?

    #13Authorsacgo (341181) 09 Dec 19, 15:46
    Comment

    Nicht in der von dir beabsichtigten Bedeutung, wie du auch den Links aus #12 sowie der Aussage aus #10 entnehmen kannst.

    #14Authorpenguin (236245) 09 Dec 19, 16:05
     
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