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    Englisch gesucht

    Only this one is straining away = the moon , the Halley's Comet ? (meaning)

    Betreff

    Only this one is straining away = the moon , the Halley's Comet ? (meaning)

    Quellen

    STAGE MANAGER: Most everybody's asleep in Grover's Corners. There are a few lights on: Shorty Hawkins, down at the depot, has just watched the Albany train go by. And at the livery stable somebody's setting up late and talking, - Yes, it's clearing up. There are the stars doing their old, old criss-cross journeys in the sky. Scholars haven't settled the matter yet, but they seem to think there are no living beings up there. They're just chalk .. or fire. Only this one is straining away, straining away all time to make something of itself. The strain's so bad that every sixteen hours everybody lies down and gets a rest.

    (He winds his watch.)

    Hm ... Eleven o'clock in Grover's Corners. - You get a good rest, too. Good night.


    .........................................................................................The End..................................................................................................

    (Thornton Wilder, Our Town, Act III)


    Kommentar

    Hello everyone,

    What is the author talking about when he says The strain's so bad that every sixteen hours everybody lies down and gets a rest. He is talking about a star, so I don't think it's the moon. Maybe it's Halley's Comet the author is talking about, or it's meant figuratively. It's the year 1913. It puzzles me. Please help. Thank you very much in advance.


    (Please post in English, if you like)

    Verfasserkeeblerelf (908281)  01 Dez. 22, 22:56
    Kommentar

    I think he's talking about Earth. Only Earth is working very hard at 'making something of itself', working so hard that it (or rather the people on it) have to sleep regularly.

    #1Verfasser Gibson (418762) 01 Dez. 22, 23:49
    Kommentar

    Der Spielleiter redet vorher von der Sternen. Und dann meiner Meinung nach von der Sonne. Dem Stern, der sich richtig Mühe gibt, um etwas aus sich zu machen (und unser Leben zu beeinflussen). Das "alle 16 Stunden" ist eigentlich falsch, es müssten "alle 24 Std" sein. Oder "jeweils nach 16 Std wacher Zeit schickt sie uns in den Nachtschlaf von 8 Std" . Das ist offenbar gemeint.

    #2Verfasser Harald (dede) [de] (370386)  02 Dez. 22, 09:01
    Kommentar

     Oder "jeweils nach 16 Std wacher Zeit schickt sie uns in den Nachtschlaf von 8 Std" . Das ist offenbar gemeint.


    So verstehe ich es auch.

    Und ich verstehe nicht, warum manche Leoniden sich über die Anfragen von keeberelf so aufregen. Nicht alles kann man googlen, und selbst wenn: Bei anderen Anfragen macht man weit weniger kritische Bemerkungen.

    #3Verfasser wienergriessler (925617) 02 Dez. 22, 09:09
    Kommentar

    OT @ ich verstehe nicht, warum - Na ja, Aufregenachfolger für azhong vielleicht. Der ist ja jetzt weg ;-)

    #4Verfasser manni3 (305129) 02 Dez. 22, 09:30
    Kommentar

    @3: Wenn keeblerelf nur Fragen wie diese stellte, würde sich wohl niemand aufregen, aber er/sie hat in den letzten Tagen das Forum mit Fragen geflutet, die sich teils durch simples Nachschlagen im Wörterbuch oder einfachste Internetrecherchen beantworten ließen. Diese scheint er/sie aber zu verweigern (ich glaube, er/sie hat irgendwo geschrieben, dass er/sie aus Prinzip nicht googelt). Und dann sollte man anfangs nur auf Englisch, zumindest aber nicht auf Deutsch antworten, obwohl er/sie anscheinend beider Sprachen mächtig ist. Dass da die Hilfsbereitschaft eher nachlässt, finde ich nachvollziehbar, Du nicht?.

    #5Verfasser Dragon (238202)  02 Dez. 22, 09:32
    Kommentar

    Hilfsbereitschaft eher nachlässt ≠ aufregen

    #6Verfasser manni3 (305129) 02 Dez. 22, 10:10
    Kommentar
    • There are the stars doing their old, old criss-cross journeys in the sky.
    • Scholars haven't settled the matter yet, but they seem to think there are no living beings up there. They're just chalk .. or fire. 
    • Only this one is straining away, straining away all time to make something of itself. The strain's so bad that every sixteen hours everybody lies down and gets a rest.


    I agree with Gibson, he's talking about the Earth. Neither underlined sentence makes any sense if he's talking about the sun.


    The progression of thought doesn't go directly from 'stars' to 'this one', but via 'up there', that is, space in general: stars - space - Earth.

    #7Verfasser papousek (343122) 02 Dez. 22, 12:07
    Kommentar

    [I hadn't yet seen #7.]

    To return to the question (which is indeed a justified enquiry):

    I'm sure Gibson's view in #1 is correct.

    And yes, by 16 hours the speaker obviously means 16 hours of wakefulness.


    It took me a while to realise what "straining away" means: I thought at first, after just seeing the subject line, that it meant that a planet was trying to pull itself away from [other planets or whatever]. But obviously it means working hard and continuously, referring to what Earth's inhabitants do.


    (away

    9. adverb [...]You can use away to emphasize a continuous or repeated action.

    He would often be working away on his computer late into the night.

    https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/...)



    Not relating to the actual question: in the second line of the passage quoted, I assume that "setting up" is the pronunciation of "sitting up" in the relevant American dialect.

    sit up

    3. phrasal verb

    If you sit up, you do not go to bed although it is very late.

    We sat up drinking and talking.

    https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/...

    #8VerfasserHecuba - UK (250280)  02 Dez. 22, 12:10
    Kommentar

    Re "setting up": It definitely means "sitting up." I'm not sure if Wilder's usage reflects a regional pronunciation or regional usage of "set" instead of "sit." As I see it, it could be either, but, as I cited in another post, it's a characteristic of Wilder's writing here.


    I basically agree with Gibson and others who support that direction (although contrary to #7, both of the underlined sentences make sense to me in context).


    Like Hecuba - UK it took me a bit to figure out hat "straining away" meant "working hard" instead of "struggling to get away from" (and I suspect that the latter is how keeblerelf was interpreting it, leading to confusion).


    I would also add that "only this one..." was a bit confusing to me at first. I was understanding "only" to be a conjunction meaning "but" or "however" instead of a modifier meaning "solely."


    I suspect that Wilder is using "stars" figuratively, in part, to mean "worlds" or "solar systems," which would include associated planets. (Of course there is no life on stars!) Thus, the leap from "up there" to the Earth isn't so extreme.


    Even if, as he says, scholars aren't in agreement about it, the stage manager seems to have accepted the fact that there is no life outside of the Earth, so he says that it is only on the Earth that people work so hard ("strain away") that they need to rest every sixteen hours. (Re #2: In English, "every 16 hours" can be taken to mean "after 16 hours awake, we need to sleep for 8 hours.")


    Also, I fully support Dragon's #5 in response to #3. I've indicated the same thing in other threads.


    However, this question is something totally different than the multitude of questions that could have been answered simply by looking in a dictionary (or could have been phrased, showing a bit of self-initiative, "I found these definitions/translations in a dictionary [citation from dictionary]. Which is meant here?" ). I could imagine that this passage could be the subject of a discussion in a ninth- or tenth-grade high school English class in the US.


    It may well be that somewhere on the Internet there are teaching resources for Our Town in which this passage is indeed addressed, but they could likely be difficult to find, even if keeblerelf were willing to do a bit of googling on their own. Thus, I'm more than happy to contribute to working out an answer to this question.


    #9Verfasser hbberlin (420040) 02 Dez. 22, 14:26
    Kommentar

    Danke hbberlin für diesen Part:

    In English, "every 16 hours" can be taken to mean "after 16 hours awake, we need to sleep for 8 hours."


    Wollte ich nämlich selbst schon nachfragen wie das every dort zu sehen ist. Perfekt.

    #10Verfasser buttermaker (826321) 02 Dez. 22, 14:46
    Kommentar

    Funktioniert fast genauso auf Deutsch: Alle 16 Stunden brauchen wir Schlaf.

    #11Verfasser Gibson (418762)  02 Dez. 22, 14:56
    Kommentar

    Danke, Gibson. So geht es ganz zwanglos unf flüssig. Ich denke zu mathematisch. ;-)

    #12Verfasser Harald (dede) [de] (370386) 02 Dez. 22, 15:16
    Quellen
    Kommentar

    alle 16 Stunden klingelt mein Wecker

    0 hrs

    16 hrs

    32 = 1d 8 hrs

    und so weiter,

    oder habe ich da in Mathe nicht aufgepasst.


    Edit

    @12 so geht's mir auch.


    #13Verfasser buttermaker (826321)  02 Dez. 22, 15:21
    Kommentar

    hbberlin, both the underlined sentences make perfect sense to me if we assume he's talking about Earth - which I think we're all agreed that he is. But there was a suggestion in #2 that the 'only this one' might be the sun, at which point I don't think the underlined sentences make sense in the way they do if the Earth is meant.

    #14Verfasser papousek (343122) 02 Dez. 22, 15:37
     
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