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    am ehesten noch

    Sources
    "am ehesten noch die englische"

    From a passage saying that no western society is immune to right-wing extremism - not the French, the Germans, the Dutch...am ehesten noch die englische
    Comment
    Just not sure what that final sentence means - any help much appreciated!
    AuthorLooloobelle (413002) 30 Aug 09, 21:46
    Suggestion.. if any, then the English one.
    #1Author Werner (236488) 30 Aug 09, 21:50
    Comment
    Werner's is fine - but take out "one."
    #2Author Bill (US) (236753) 30 Aug 09, 21:52
    Comment
    Why? It refers to "society".
    #3Author Werner (236488) 30 Aug 09, 21:54
    Comment
    Because it is inconsistent with "the French, the Germans, the Dutch" which precedes it.
    #4Author Bill (US) (236753) 30 Aug 09, 21:56
    Comment
    I don't think you would have to add "one" to each of the countries; if added to the last one it becomes clear that it is good for the other ones, too. I am not a native speaker, though, and leave the final word to dude to make him happy.
    #5Author Werner (236488) 30 Aug 09, 22:24
    Comment
    Thank you, Werner. :-)

    I happen to agree with Bill.
    #6Authordude30 Aug 09, 22:27
    Comment
    It's strange that "englische" rather than "britische" is used. I don't think the Welsh and the Scots are any less immune than the British. Or is "englische" some sort of shorthand for "British and American" here?
    #7AuthorA Scot30 Aug 09, 23:54
    Comment
    We didn't write the article, but there's no shorthand here. It seems that a lot of people seem to refer to the English when they really mean the British.
    #8Author Bill (US) (236753) 30 Aug 09, 23:59
    Comment
    Hi, Bill. seems that a lot of people seem to refer to the English when they really mean the British.
    Yes, that's my point really. I think any translation should take account of that tendency. It doesn't make sense (to a British person) to talk about "English society" here.
    #9AuthorA Scot31 Aug 09, 00:12
    Comment
    It may not make sense, but that's what the writer wrote. I don't think it's up to us to change errors or misconceptions in someone else's writing. That is not the scope of this forum.
    #10Author Bill (US) (236753) 31 Aug 09, 00:17
    Comment
    Well, sorry, Bill, but I disagree with you there. I think it's important for a translation to convey the intent of the author. This is such a common mistake/misconception among German-speakers that it's obvious that the author doesn't intend to single out the English, but is just using "englische" in the rather imprecise way that many Germans do when they actually mean "britische". I really don't think a translator would be doing the author any great service by sticking to "English" in this instance. But we could talk about translation theory into the wee small hours, which are closer from where I'm sitting than they are for you;-). So, I'll bid you goodnight.
    #11AuthorA Scot31 Aug 09, 00:50
    Comment
    Though I agree that it may sometimes be appropriate to use "British" for "englisch" or "United Kingdom" for "Großbritannien", I don't think we can assume that the author meant British society or that the English language community would normally identify "society" with Britain (ncluding Scotland) rather than England.

    I would tend to associate things like society, culture, and sport with a country (or a sub-division of a country) rather than a sovereign state.
    #12AuthorMikeE (236602) 31 Aug 09, 07:55
    Comment
    Thanks everyone, and really good point @A Scot - though I was born in England, I did live in Scotland for 15 years of my life so I also tend to get a bit riled when people (whether foreign or British themselves) (ok they're usually English) talk about 'the English' only, when they are actually clearly referring to the whole of British society. However, I am in two minds here as this is an interview - the answer the interviewee gives does refer to 'die englische' society. It's very tricky because he probably is referring to the whole of the UK, considering he says 'any western European society' and is then probably meaning the society in the UK when he refers to the "English" at the end, as I'm pretty sure he didn't intend to separate the English from the Welsh, Scots and Irish. Ok I've talked myself into it - I'm going to put British.
    Thanks to everyone for your input! :)
    #13AuthorLooloobelle (413002) 31 Aug 09, 11:34
     
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