Advertising
LEO

It looks like you’re using an ad blocker.

Would you like to support LEO?

Disable your ad blocker for LEO or make a donation.

 
  •  
  • Forum home

    Translation correct?

    Kohäsion verlieren - loose cohesion

    Source Language Term

    Kohäsion verlieren chem.

    Correct?

    loose cohesion

    Examples/ definitions with source references
    Klebstoffe verlieren folglich ihre Kohäsion.

    Adhesives consequently loose their cohesion.
    Comment
    Es geht um technische Spezifikationen für Klebstoffe.

    Problem ist hier: ist "loose their cohesion" korrekt oder müsste es eher heißen: "lose their cohesion".Im Zusammenhang mit cohesion findet man nämlich im Internet viele Treffer mit "loose". Bin total irritiert und würde gerne einmal die Meinung eines Muttersprachlers hierzu hören. Danke!
    Authorconnyro (297661) 23 Sep 08, 10:15
    Comment
    "loose cohesion" würde ich als lockeren Zusammenhalt übersetzen. Ich finde es nicht erstaunlich, dass es da einige Google-Treffer gibt.
    #1AuthorRosentod (DE)23 Sep 08, 10:20
    Comment
    Aber im genauen Zusammenhang, wo beschrieben wird, dass Klebstoffe bei hohen Temperaturen ihre Kohäsion verlieren, sollte man doch eher "they lose their cohesion" verwenden oder kann man auch "loose" rechtfertigen, denn es bedeutet ja, dass sich die Haftung/Bindung mit dem Werkstoff lockert.
    #2Authorconnyro (297661) 23 Sep 08, 10:24
    Comment
    "to loose cohesion" - die Kohäsion (auf)lösen
    "to lose cohesion" - die Kohäsion einbüßen
    #3AuthorRosentod (DE)23 Sep 08, 10:54
    Comment
    Thanks Rosentod
    #4Authorconnyro (297661) 29 Sep 08, 18:49
    Comment
    No, it is =lose= their cohesion. Loose is not a verb. It is an adjective. Many people seem to confuse the two. There is, however, a verb loosen, which might be what you are looking for. I'm not a scientist, so cannot say whether it is possible to say the cohesion can be loosened, but it sounds possible .... Adhesives lose their cohesion [Is that the right word? - I would expect 'adhesion', but, then, I'm not a scientist :-) ]
    #5Authoreilthireach (BE)29 Sep 08, 22:17
    Context/ examples
    ... Adhesives lose their cohesion [Is that the right word? - I would expect 'adhesion', but, then, I'm not a scientist :-) ]
    Comment
    There is a difference but you'd have to ask a scientist, which I'm not either.

    A friend of mine works for a large company producing adhesives and has explained the difference to me several times. It is clear ... but sadly only for a short while.

    Try googling the two terms together. There's sure to be an answer there on the Net.
    #6AuthorEvelyn33 (482007) 30 Sep 08, 22:37
    Comment
    They definitely *lose* their cohesion, which is proper in this context.

    @eilthireach: *Loose* can, however, be used as a verb meaning "to release." For instance, Pandora loosed the plagues upon the world when she opened the box.
    #7AuthorPHLbrian (262852) 01 Oct 08, 01:03
     
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  
 
 
 
 
  automatisch zu   umgewandelt