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    Translation correct?

    Babylonisches Sprachgewirr - Babylonian confusion, or a flurry of events?

    Source Language Term

    Babylonisches Sprachgewirr

    Correct?

    Babylonian confusion, or a flurry of events?

    Examples/ definitions with source references
    Babylonisches Sprachgewirr im eigentlich eher beschaulichen Nordwesten ...
    A headline for a paragraph which has no connection to languages whatsoever: it describes a new university campus with lots of nice modern buildings for the science department.
    Comment
    Could this simply mean that a lot is going on all at once? The description doesn't even sound like there's any confusion, and it is obviously meant to be a positive description of all the new buildings on the lovely new campus.
    Author CM2DD (236324) 25 Sep 08, 12:50
    Comment
    no, it needs to refer to people. Maybe a reference to all the future students and scientists from all over the world, where there used to be two monosyllabic farmers before?
    #1Authorspinatwachtel25 Sep 08, 12:52
    Suggestions

    Babylonian babble

    -

    ??



    Comment
    Perhaps?
    #2AuthorBacon [de] (264333) 25 Sep 08, 12:53
    Comment
    Not a single mention of students, other countries or anything. Huh, maybe the area is just known to be international; I'll ask the client to make sure.
    #3AuthorCM2DD (236324) 25 Sep 08, 12:55
    Comment
    does it refer to the architecture of the place? a sort of style potpourri?
    #4Authornoli25 Sep 08, 12:55
    Comment
    Aber "Sprachgewirr" kann (bzw. darf) sich, wie spinatwachtel schon geschrieben hat, nur auf Sprache beziehen, also auf Menschen. Oder Schilder?
    #5AuthorMattes (236368) 25 Sep 08, 12:57
    Comment
    CMDD: Germans probably do not remember their image of Babel derives from the bible - or maybe they do, there is a large exhibition in Berlin at the moment which shows "the real" Babel as compared to the myth - but I think Englisch native speakers would be more inclined to think of the biblical judgement.

    Agree with spinach, they are probably refering to the bable and exitement of the stutents and teachers from all over the world that they hope we come work there.

    Is there a positive multicultural saying in English which might apply better?
    #6AuthorCJ unplugged25 Sep 08, 12:58
    Comment
    CM2DD, OT: I don't even know why I respond...you deserve to have this thread sink into obscurity whilst all of Leo is multi-slacking in your other thread, condensing their many frustrations as translators into moderately witty dictionary entries.
    Must dash, have just thought of another one.
    #7Authorspinatwachtel25 Sep 08, 12:58
    Comment
    Wait, have just found a mention of international scientists! Still, confusion doesn't sound like the kind of image I'd want to project in this context. Is the German used in a positive way, with no connection to people failing to understand each other as God's punishment for them getting too cheeky?
    #8AuthorCM2DD (236324) 25 Sep 08, 13:02
    Comment
    Ja, CM2DD, CJ schon angedeutet hat, wird das im Deutschen auch positiv verwendet, im Sinne von "Wow, kuck mal, wie viele Sprachen hier gesprochen werden", nicht im Sinne der biblischen Strafe.
    #9AuthorMattes (236368) 25 Sep 08, 13:06
    Comment
    *slinkingintoputadinstudent*

    melting pot perhaps?
    #10AuthorCJ unplugged25 Sep 08, 13:06
    Comment
    ...wie CJ schon angedeutet hat...
    #11AuthorMattes (236368) 25 Sep 08, 13:07
    Comment
    pursuit of science in a latter-day Babylon...

    or so
    #12Authornoli25 Sep 08, 13:10
    Comment
    OK, thanks! That's really helpful.
    #13AuthorCM2DD (236324) 25 Sep 08, 13:13
    Comment
    Not to be a wet blanket or anything, but does Babylon really have any figurative connection to language at all in English?

    Yes, there's the Tower of Babel, the figurative place with many languages from the biblical story. (And yes, the connotation in English is usually negative: confusion, babbling.)

    Babylon, in contrast, is the name of the ancient geographical region. But for me at least, that word doesn't call up any association with language(s) at all.

    Not that that helps solve the translation question, I realize, sorry ...
    #14Authorhm -- us (236141) 25 Sep 08, 22:05
    Comment
    I made it into a symphony of languages in the end :-)
    #15AuthorCM2DD (236324) 25 Sep 08, 22:59
     
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